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(Empire Magazine)   Listen to the complete The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey soundtrack   (empireonline.com) divider line 59
    More: Spiffy, The Hobbit, Annie Lennox, soundtracks, echos  
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2474 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 14 Nov 2012 at 2:31 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-14 02:46:20 AM
psychotic-pyro-in-me.tripod.com

"We likes it!"
 
2012-11-14 02:48:42 AM

Apos: [psychotic-pyro-in-me.tripod.com image 125x71]

"We likes it!"


why would tripods like it?
 
2012-11-14 02:51:08 AM
pressed play... heard LOTR theme...

...calibrating disappoint-o-meter
 
2012-11-14 02:59:36 AM
The only song I care about is the song the Dwarves were singing in the first trailer. And only that exact same composition. I don't care for the way they did the song when they released the single the other day.
 
2012-11-14 03:05:37 AM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: pressed play... heard LOTR theme...

...calibrating disappoint-o-meter


So The Hobbit is coming up short?
 
2012-11-14 03:24:39 AM

farkingismybusiness: The All-Powerful Atheismo: pressed play... heard LOTR theme...

...calibrating disappoint-o-meter

So The Hobbit is coming up short?


Only in the porn version.
 
2012-11-14 03:36:10 AM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: farkingismybusiness: The All-Powerful Atheismo: pressed play... heard LOTR theme...

...calibrating disappoint-o-meter

So The Hobbit is coming up short?

Only in the porn version.


upload.wikimedia.org
Benedict Cumberbatch might change that.
 
2012-11-14 03:40:46 AM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: pressed play... heard LOTR theme...

...calibrating disappoint-o-meter


Well, given that the movie does start with Frodo reading the book and Bilbo narrating it is to be understood that it starts with LOTR.

It changes quickly though.

/god how I love Howard Shore
 
2012-11-14 04:06:27 AM
Have they decided not to include Legolas or that horrible new character the writers added to get more demographics?

Because if not, I'm still having nothing to do with this movie.

/JRR would be super pissed
 
2012-11-14 04:14:49 AM
As someone who listens to all 12 hours of the Lord of the Rings scores uninterrupted at least once a week, this is kind of a big deal for me.

The opening few minutes does recapitulate some themes from Fellowship of the Ring and from Return of the King, mostly in cues from scenes in Bag End and Moria. This probably should not surprise anyone, since those are the bits with Hobbits and (Dead) Dwarfs. I imagine that it's pretty hard to make ~20 total hours of musical score without using leitmotif.

Also, antipiracy be damned, I'm recording this so I can listen later. I already paid Amazon for a preorder of the CDs. I'm disappointed that they're not including mutlichannel DVD-Audio discs this time.
 
2012-11-14 04:40:01 AM
Around the 39:00 mark, there's a big, dramatic statement of the Lonely Mountain Theme. Lots of drums and French Horns. Folks who got the shivers from the Hobbit Trailer, that is something to look forward to. :)
 
2012-11-14 04:42:52 AM

Spaced Lion: Have they decided not to include Legolas or that horrible new character the writers added to get more demographics?

Because if not, I'm still having nothing to do with this movie.

/JRR would be super pissed


Not to mention the shiatty movie version of Gollum
 
2012-11-14 04:46:38 AM
s3.vidimg.popscreen.com

/oblig
 
2012-11-14 04:52:18 AM

RatMaster999: [s3.vidimg.popscreen.com image 480x360]

/oblig



That's actually on the soundtrack, seriously. It's a bonus track at the end. But since you can't skip in the recording, you have to listen all the way to the end.
 
2012-11-14 06:55:30 AM
Not a damn thing on there sounded like Journey. It was much nicer than the Fillipino version though.
 
2012-11-14 07:11:33 AM

dejavoodoo64: Not a damn thing on there sounded like Journey. It was much nicer than the Fillipino version though.


THIS. I'd much rather have them use contemporary music to highlight this epic series of films. Do you really think these classical compositions and true-to-the-book songs are going to hold up in twenty years? Yeah, OK.

Now, you want an epic fantasy movie whose soundtrack has withstood the test of time? Hands down, Ladyhawke.
 
2012-11-14 07:23:12 AM

likefunbutnot: As someone who listens to all 12 hours of the Lord of the Rings scores uninterrupted at least once a week, this is kind of a big deal for me.



Glad I'm not the only one. I stream the LOTR soundtracks at work all the time (ROTK is my favorite of the three).

I achieved goosebumpery several times while listening to this one. Shore is a genius.
 
2012-11-14 07:23:57 AM

born_yesterday: dejavoodoo64: Not a damn thing on there sounded like Journey. It was much nicer than the Fillipino version though.

THIS. I'd much rather have them use contemporary music to highlight this epic series of films. Do you really think these classical compositions and true-to-the-book songs are going to hold up in twenty years? Yeah, OK.

Now, you want an epic fantasy movie whose soundtrack has withstood the test of time? Hands down, Ladyhawke.


+1 lold
 
2012-11-14 07:29:00 AM
What an unexpected Journey soundtrack might look like: 

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-11-14 08:13:53 AM
And then have jackson destroy what you read and how you saw it in your own head....

for those that don't know the trilogy and hobbit were books.. its things we used to read.. and jackson destroyed them and gets awards and millions for doing it.. READ THE farkING BOOKS.....
 
2012-11-14 08:23:42 AM

Icetech3: And then have jackson destroy what you read and how you saw it in your own head....

for those that don't know the trilogy and hobbit were books.. its things we used to read.. and jackson destroyed them and gets awards and millions for doing it.. READ THE farkING BOOKS.....


www.bit-101.com
 
2012-11-14 08:54:45 AM

Icetech3: And then have jackson destroy what you read and how you saw it in your own head....

for those that don't know the trilogy and hobbit were books.. its things we used to read.. and jackson destroyed them and gets awards and millions for doing it.. READ THE farkING BOOKS.....


While it's true that Jackson was a complete hack with LotR, they are still good movies with inappropriate titles. I liken them to the Brodderick Godzilla - as "The Giant Radioactive Lizard that Attacked New York" it was a fun flick; as a Godzilla movie it was a bucket of fail.
 
2012-11-14 08:54:48 AM

Icetech3: And then have jackson destroy what you read and how you saw it in your own head....

for those that don't know the trilogy and hobbit were books.. its things we used to read.. and jackson destroyed them and gets awards and millions for doing it.. READ THE farkING BOOKS.....


Hey, cockmongler, there are those of us who enjoy the movies and the books.
 
2012-11-14 08:56:22 AM
Starting to listen.. good so far.
 
2012-11-14 09:07:26 AM

Meethos: Icetech3: And then have jackson destroy what you read and how you saw it in your own head....

for those that don't know the trilogy and hobbit were books.. its things we used to read.. and jackson destroyed them and gets awards and millions for doing it.. READ THE farkING BOOKS.....

Hey, cockmongler, there are those of us who enjoy the movies and the books.


I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.
 
2012-11-14 09:07:26 AM
I'll give it another listen today; had too much fun trying to match themes with scenes last night to really appreciate it. Shore is great. I even listened to a couple of old Lighthouse songs last night to salute his career. (For you kids out there, Lighthouse was kinda like Chicago - if they were from Toronto.) Anyone that has watched the appendices that accompany the LOTR films will have a pretty good idea of the pressure and time constraints involved with writing for a Jackson film - while he's still editing! - and that makes Shore's work with him all the more remarkable.
 
2012-11-14 09:58:36 AM

Optimus Primate: likefunbutnot: As someone who listens to all 12 hours of the Lord of the Rings scores uninterrupted at least once a week, this is kind of a big deal for me.

Glad I'm not the only one. I stream the LOTR soundtracks at work all the time (ROTK is my favorite of the three).

I achieved goosebumpery several times while listening to this one. Shore is a genius.


Good to see soundtrack music lovers here. The LOTR music is really some of the best; Howard Shore & Hans Zimmer music have permanent slots on my daily playlist (esp. at work.)

/Bear McCreary too
 
2012-11-14 10:06:11 AM

Optimus Primate: Glad I'm not the only one. I stream the LOTR soundtracks at work all the time (ROTK is my favorite of the three).


I really think the Two Towers has the strongest score of the three. It has the most unique themes are really the highest level of drama.

But my copy of the Fellowship special edition soundtrack has been signed by three Lord of the Rings main cast members, which is a nice benefit of being a guy who hangs out at comic conventions.

I do think Jackson's vision made for wonderful movies. They're not quite what Tolkein wrote, but of course the power of myth is that great stories can be reshaped in each new telling.

Anyway yeah this was a big enough deal for me that I got up at 3AM to listen to the whole score. I'm on my third listen now. :)
 
2012-11-14 10:21:12 AM

StandsWithAFist:
Good to see soundtrack music lovers here.


yes, yay! Empire had a similar widget for the Dark Knight Rises soundtrack, letting people listen to it online for free. I listened to that more than a few times.

I'm currently listening to the mass effect 3 soundtrack - I grabbed it because of clint mansell's work for the 'The Fountain'. I'll throw in this new one later today.
 
2012-11-14 10:26:31 AM
Hey, since we're mentioning awesome soundtracks, does anyone else have a deep and abiding love for Cliff Martinez's work on "Solaris?" Or Jeff Beal's on HBO's "Carnivale?"

Pandora's Clint Mansell channel is really interesting. It crosses in to full-stop classical musi, and plenty of movie soundtracks, but then it passes through various forms of acoustic performances and any number of different sorts of ambient and electronica. Extremely eclectic for a single composer's work.
 
2012-11-14 10:35:11 AM
Favorite soundtracks?
Glad you asked.
SKY CAPTAIN and the World of Tomorrow.
Dark Knight
And for some reason, I can't get enough of the Avengers soundtrack.
 
2012-11-14 10:38:51 AM

Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.


Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.

Audiences were never going to get a translation of the books to film, only an adaptation. The very fact Jackson managed to coherently adapt the book to film was remarkable in and of itself. You sorely underestimate the amount of content in the book, the amount of it that had no way whatsoever to even translate to film let alone coherently, and let alone how much of it just wouldn't have played well on film.

Would you rather have gotten nothing, or something that attempted to stay as true to the book as possible at the cost of coherence and the ability to draw in a crowd?
 
2012-11-14 10:42:10 AM
Link

/oblig
 
2012-11-14 10:48:13 AM

likefunbutnot:
Pandora's Clint Mansell channel is really interesting. It crosses in to full-stop classical musi, and plenty of movie soundtracks, but then it passes through various forms of acoustic performances and any number of different sorts of ambient and electronica. Extremely eclectic for a single composer's work.


I saw StandsWithAFist mention Bear McCreary, and he seems very similar to me. Especially listening over all the seasons of battlestar galactica, he brought in so many different areas of music - and unusual instruments as well. I watch 'Walking Dead', and I love the music there. Here's a video of Bear McCreary describing how they use the hurdy gurdy for the show:

Link
 
2012-11-14 10:53:17 AM

StandsWithAFist: Good to see soundtrack music lovers here. The LOTR music is really some of the best; Howard Shore & Hans Zimmer music have permanent slots on my daily playlist (esp. at work.)

/Bear McCreary too


I weep for music lovers everywhere.
 
2012-11-14 10:59:34 AM

peterthx: I weep for music lovers everywhere.


I know, right? Those guys are horrible. Why couldn't they have gotten real artists to compose The Hobbit's soundtrack, like Avril Lavigne and Creed?
 
2012-11-14 11:19:25 AM

that bosnian sniper: peterthx: I weep for music lovers everywhere.

I know, right? Those guys are horrible. Why couldn't they have gotten real artists to compose The Hobbit's soundtrack, like Avril Lavigne and Creed?


"I know we just met, and this is crazy, but whats in my pocket?"
"... a ring, maybe?"
 
2012-11-14 11:27:38 AM

that bosnian sniper: Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.

Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.



The Scouring of the Shire, a major theme, is the heart and soul of the work. It was left out completely.
 
2012-11-14 11:50:15 AM

that bosnian sniper: peterthx: I weep for music lovers everywhere.

I know, right? Those guys are horrible. Why couldn't they have gotten real artists to compose The Hobbit's soundtrack, like Avril Lavigne and Creed?


Nice try smartass.
The factory output of Zimmer makes the great classical and film composers of the past roll in their graves.

/BSG music also sucks ass
 
2012-11-14 11:56:41 AM

Clash City Farker: that bosnian sniper: Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.

Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.



The Scouring of the Shire, a major theme, is the heart and soul of the work. It was left out completely.


This^

I'm not thick enough to think that Jackson could adapt a film using the whole book, sorry Tom Bombadil lovers, I was sorely disappointed that he left out the Scouring. Maybe if he cut down on all the false endings in RoTK he could have fit it in.
 
2012-11-14 12:01:49 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-14 12:02:46 PM

Clash City Farker: that bosnian sniper: Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.

Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.



The Scouring of the Shire, a major theme, is the heart and soul of the work. It was left out completely.


It wasn't left out completely, it was shown in the Mirror of Galadriel scene.
 
2012-11-14 12:13:13 PM

Wookie Milson: It wasn't left out completely, it was shown in the Mirror of Galadriel scene.


That's what I was about to say. Considering that, and the fact Jackson played up the anti-industrialist and environmentalist themes also present in the Scouring of the Shire that nobody seems to remember through Isengard itself, it's an acceptable concession for the sake of modern film-making and modern audiences.

The conclusion of a B-plot arc with its own rising action and climax, in the middle of a larger denouement after the eucatastrophe, would not have played well with audiences or translated well to film.
 
2012-11-14 12:14:09 PM
i1177.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-14 12:36:47 PM
that bosnian sniper: eucatastrophe

I love this word, but have never been able to use it since first hearing it. Well played, sir.
 
2012-11-14 12:41:50 PM

that bosnian sniper: Wookie Milson: It wasn't left out completely, it was shown in the Mirror of Galadriel scene.

That's what I was about to say. Considering that, and the fact Jackson played up the anti-industrialist and environmentalist themes also present in the Scouring of the Shire that nobody seems to remember through Isengard itself, it's an acceptable concession for the sake of modern film-making and modern audiences.

The conclusion of a B-plot arc with its own rising action and climax, in the middle of a larger denouement after the eucatastrophe, would not have played well with audiences or translated well to film.


This is exactly it. The scouring of the shire was one of my favorite parts of the books, but it just wouldn't work in the movie. In a perfect world, it would have been filmed and only included in the extended version, but I can't actually expect that. Particularly with Saruman having died earlier in the series. I'm enough of a fan/nerd that I sat through the movies listening to the commentaries, and the writers do a remarkable job of explaining most of the decisions that I didn't agree with. I still might wish they did it differently, but they have very reasonable justifications for what they did.
 
2012-11-14 01:07:55 PM

gbv23: [i1177.photobucket.com image 400x400]


Is it possible to draw a picture that has less to do with the Lord of the Rings?
 
2012-11-14 01:18:46 PM
An Unexpected Journey is a really lame subtitle
 
2012-11-14 01:24:15 PM

Erix: This is exactly it. The scouring of the shire was one of my favorite parts of the books, but it just wouldn't work in the movie. In a perfect world, it would have been filmed and only included in the extended version, but I can't actually expect that. Particularly with Saruman having died earlier in the series. I'm enough of a fan/nerd that I sat through the movies listening to the commentaries, and the writers do a remarkable job of explaining most of the decisions that I didn't agree with. I still might wish they did it differently, but they have very reasonable justifications for what they did.


Yup. It would have been nice to see a lot of these things in an "extended edition only for the hardcore nerd fans", but in a major film those dogs just wouldn't hunt. I think a lot of those same hardcore fans don't properly estimate how gigantic of an unwatchable clusterfark a film version that remained completely true to the books would have been. It'd have made David Lynch's Dune look like Casablanca.
 
2012-11-14 01:49:18 PM

likefunbutnot: Hey, since we're mentioning awesome soundtracks, does anyone else have a deep and abiding love for Cliff Martinez's work on "Solaris?" Or Jeff Beal's on HBO's "Carnivale?"


I enjoyed Beal's work on "Rome", so I'm looking forward to checking out "Carnivale" too. I haven't listened to "Solaris" yet, but that's why I love these (rare) soundtrack threads - more music to search out & enjoy.

If you're looking for a great eclectic/world music soundtrack, check out "Baraka" (one of my favorites!)
 
2012-11-14 01:53:50 PM

leakybucket: likefunbutnot:
Pandora's Clint Mansell channel is really interesting. It crosses in to full-stop classical musi, and plenty of movie soundtracks, but then it passes through various forms of acoustic performances and any number of different sorts of ambient and electronica. Extremely eclectic for a single composer's work.

I saw StandsWithAFist mention Bear McCreary, and he seems very similar to me. Especially listening over all the seasons of battlestar galactica, he brought in so many different areas of music - and unusual instruments as well. I watch 'Walking Dead', and I love the music there. Here's a video of Bear McCreary describing how they use the hurdy gurdy for the show:

Link


Cool link - will definitely be bookmarking that for later, thanks! I always wondered what instrument made that particular sound, since it's so distinctive.
 
2012-11-14 02:11:56 PM
You cant say Scouring was covered in the Mirror of Galadriel, because thats what Sam saw anyway. Scouring is not even so much about Sam, he is already great by that point. Frodo is spent. Its really about Merry and Pippin handling things themselves.

Leaving that out, puts more focus on the human characters (who are stiff as cardboard), and not the Hobbits. Its the Hobbit deeds that carried the day, not the acts of men. Men would have lost on their own. Seeing the movies, you think its men that handled things.
 
2012-11-14 02:26:46 PM

gbv23: [i1177.photobucket.com image 400x400]


Lord of the Rings - Hobbitry of the Penis
 
2012-11-14 07:01:01 PM

Zombie DJ: Favorite soundtracks?
Glad you asked.


ecx.images-amazon.com

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2012-11-14 09:51:28 PM

Clash City Farker: You cant say Scouring was covered in the Mirror of Galadriel, because thats what Sam saw anyway. Scouring is not even so much about Sam, he is already great by that point. Frodo is spent. Its really about Merry and Pippin handling things themselves.

Leaving that out, puts more focus on the human characters (who are stiff as cardboard), and not the Hobbits. Its the Hobbit deeds that carried the day, not the acts of men. Men would have lost on their own. Seeing the movies, you think its men that handled things.



You watched those movies and came away thinking that Men defeated Sauron? They cut tons of scenes to focus on Frodo, Sam, Gollum, and the Ring. It's painfully evident that by the end of the movie Frodo and Sam were heroes that had carried the day (and the age).

Yes, the book is better. Books are always better. However, you cannot shoot the book as a movie. Some things had to be sacrificed, and of all the endings in the book, they really needed to show the crowning of King Elessar Telcontar, and the final farewell at the Grey Havens. They threw in some extras of Frodo growing weary of Middle Earth and that is fine. What they could not do was follow-up the destruction of the One Ring and the power of Sauron with a minor proxy war in the Shire. That's bad film making.

It would have been awesome if they had shot the Scouring of the Shire as a side, maybe 50-75 minutes, and released it with the extended editions. Getting financial backing for that probably wouldn't have happened.
 
2012-11-15 12:35:37 PM

that bosnian sniper: Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.

Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.

Audiences were never going to get a translation of the books to film, only an adaptation. The very fact Jackson managed to coherently adapt the book to film was remarkable in and of itself. You sorely underestimate the amount of content in the book, the amount of it that had no way whatsoever to even translate to film let alone coherently, and let alone how much of it just wouldn't have played well on film.

Would you rather have gotten nothing, or something that attempted to stay as true to the book as possible at the cost of coherence and the ability to draw in a crowd?


If you want a good adaptation at all, the 1970s-era dramatic radio play for LOTR (narrated by Tammy Grimes) was excellent. I remember listening to it on my local college radio station on Sunday nights, and it gave me a lot of late Monday mornings at school. Then Tom Baker's Doctor Who showed up on PBS a year later and it was all over but the cryin'.
 
2012-11-16 06:28:03 AM

th0th: If you want a good adaptation at all, the 1970s-era dramatic radio play for LOTR (narrated by Tammy Grimes) was excellent. I remember listening to it on my local college radio station on Sunday nights, and it gave me a lot of late Monday mornings at school. Then Tom Baker's Doctor Who showed up on PBS a year later and it was all over but the cryin'.


There was a great audio version of The Hobbit that my family had on cassette, 5 of them I think. We took it with us on long car trips a lot. Excellent voice characterizations, and nothing left out.

We got a LOTR set later on, probably made by the same people, on CD, but it was certainly abridged, and it never caught on with us.
 
2012-11-16 02:10:31 PM

that bosnian sniper: Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.

Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.

Audiences were never going to get a translation of the books to film, only an adaptation. The very fact Jackson managed to coherently adapt the book to film was remarkable in and of itself. You sorely underestimate the amount of content in the book, the amount of it that had no way whatsoever to even translate to film let alone coherently, and let alone how much of it just wouldn't have played well on film.

Would you rather have gotten nothing, or something that attempted to stay as true to the book as possible at the cost of coherence and the ability to draw in a crowd?


No, they were visually awesome. They were very poor adaptations and missed nearly every single plot and character point of the books. They kept names and the idea of a ring, and that was about it.
 
2012-11-16 02:14:29 PM

Clash City Farker: that bosnian sniper: Carousel Beast: I'm one of those. It doesn't change the fact that the movies were poor adaptations of the books.

Get off your high horse. The Jackson films were the about the best adaptations you were going to be able to expect. The basic plot and the major themes were preserved, necessary concessions for the sake of a modern audience had to be made (and were without compromising plot or theme), and content had to be necessarily cut.



The Scouring of the Shire, a major theme, is the heart and soul of the work. It was left out completely.


The larger point was the Dominion of Men. Elves were bit-players in the books for a very specific reason, and it's no mistake that everyone who could say no to the ring either already had one of their own, or was of the race of Men. The faux character development that Jackson put in - and I understand why he did it - killed the adaptation. The only development to be had was from the Hobbits. Everyone else coming into the story had a specific background and many years of experience and were fully developed "off camera", as it were. Jackson completely devalued everyone that wasn't an elf.
 
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