If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Consumerist)   I didn't read the terms and conditions of the Delta SkyMiles program and they kicked me out. Can you help me get their CEO sent to Guantanamo Bay?   (consumerist.com) divider line 120
    More: Dumbass, Guantanamo Bay, SkyMiles, frequent flyer programs, plain meaning  
•       •       •

14543 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Nov 2012 at 8:54 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



120 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-11-14 12:33:11 AM
My brother in law is COO for a compny that has plants from Alberta to Oaxaca and Pennsylvania to Vegas and puts $15,000 to $20,000 on his credit card every month which is then reimbursed to him by his company. Needless to say you'd think any credit card company would think he's a wet dream of a client but he switched to a miles without blackout times fly any airline credit card for a free year. When the year was up they wanted to charge him a fee just as he had redeemed all his rewards sending his kids to Europe. He talked to everybody he could get on the phone but they were all adamant about him paying the card fee even though he'd spent over $200,000 with them in a year. He ended up canceling the card and they lost tens of thousands of dollars after he went some place else. Corporate mentality is idiotic.
 
2012-11-14 12:51:30 AM
Hey drew...stop selling out..daily mill, now this shiat..fark it, back to reddit
 
2012-11-14 12:52:28 AM
whatshisname: Or, heaven forbid, they could embrace a high profile customer and his odd companion and use it for some form of self-promotion.

Like, hire him to play some music for a commercial or something.
 
2012-11-14 12:52:37 AM

pyrotek85: They lost his million dollar cello? I hope that was insured.


I'd guess "damaged."

OscarTamerz: Needless to say you'd think any credit card company would think he's a wet dream of a client but he switched to a miles without blackout times fly any airline credit card for a free year. When the year was up they wanted to charge him a fee just as he had redeemed all his rewards sending his kids to Europe.


Just out of curiosity, do you know what the fee was? I'm curious whether the CC company was just stupid or puts-underwear-on-head derpy.
 
2012-11-14 01:24:28 AM
Cellos are very light and don't have baggage. I really don't see the problem here. The point is to make money, right? Well, they made money from the cello. My mom is fat, and she purchases two seats when she flies. Why shouldn't she get miles for both tickets? She's doing them a favor! She doesn't belong to any FF programs, but she should get credit if she did.
 
2012-11-14 01:41:56 AM

Endive Wombat: Wait...based off the way I am reading this, Delta is the asshat here, not the OP.

I presume he is paying full price for the second seat that is occupied by the instrument. So, if that is the case, who the fark cares if it is a living, breathing human, dog, pet rock, imaginary friend or musical instrument.

Money is being spent for a second seat and that is that.

What am I missing here?


You're missing the fact that it matters not one jot who paid for the seat, the program says the miles go to the occupant of said seat. If I book three seats for myself, my wife, and my child, I don't get to keep all those miles for myself. If this muppet buys seats for himself and his cello, he only gets to accrue miles for himself.

He was aware of the terms, he agreed to them, he's at fault. That simple.

I hate the airlines too nowadays because they're the airlines, but in this case they're not at fault.
 
2012-11-14 01:47:30 AM

gweilo8888: Endive Wombat: Wait...based off the way I am reading this, Delta is the asshat here, not the OP.

I presume he is paying full price for the second seat that is occupied by the instrument. So, if that is the case, who the fark cares if it is a living, breathing human, dog, pet rock, imaginary friend or musical instrument.

Money is being spent for a second seat and that is that.

What am I missing here?

You're missing the fact that it matters not one jot who paid for the seat, the program says the miles go to the occupant of said seat. If I book three seats for myself, my wife, and my child, I don't get to keep all those miles for myself. If this muppet buys seats for himself and his cello, he only gets to accrue miles for himself.

He was aware of the terms, he agreed to them, he's at fault. That simple.

I hate the airlines too nowadays because they're the airlines, but in this case they're not at fault.


The rules are the rules, no matter how utterly moronic and designed to screw people as they are?

\In this state, speeding 20 over results in a sentence of 50 years of hard labor. Sorry, but 'dems the rules.
\\Are you actually incapable of thinking for yourself and using judgement, or are you just faking it?
 
2012-11-14 02:21:58 AM

B.L.Z. Bub: oryx: If a corporation can be a person, why not a cello?

Yes, a corporation is not a person, therefore the government should be able to control them however it desires without restraint. It's not like people run them or invest in them.

And also, a marriage is not a person, therefore the government should be able to dissolve your marriage if it feels like it.

And a will is just a piece of paper attributed to a corpse, therefore the government should be able to seize people's property when they die.

Do you see what tyranny is possible when you say, "I can't point to a single living human embodiment of this corporation/marriage/will, etc., therefore the government can do whatever it wants with it"? Might as well say that a government is not a person, therefore I'm free to pretend it doesn't exist.


Please go read up on logical fallacies.
 
2012-11-14 03:13:59 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Endive Wombat: Wait...based off the way I am reading this, Delta is the asshat here, not the OP.

I presume he is paying full price for the second seat that is occupied by the instrument. So, if that is the case, who the fark cares if it is a living, breathing human, dog, pet rock, imaginary friend or musical instrument.

Money is being spent for a second seat and that is that.

What am I missing here?

I recently paid full price for a non-refundable ticket from LAX to Tokyo that I had to forfeit because my travel plans suddenly changed. The miles from that leg of my trip would not be granted because I was not physically present on the flight, even though for all intents and purposes I had 1. already paid for the ticket and 2. saved the plane money by not taking a seat on board.

In this case too, the guy may not feel like it, but by buying a seat for his cello (something that can't accrue miles on its own) he isn't also buying the rights to the flight miles.

It doesn't feel right, but them's the breaks.


True, though you got your taxes paid back (assuming you took the 5 minutes required to pick up the phone and call), which is probably equivalent to miles denied.
 
2012-11-14 03:26:41 AM

evaned: pyrotek85: They lost his million dollar cello? I hope that was insured.

I'd guess "damaged."

OscarTamerz: Needless to say you'd think any credit card company would think he's a wet dream of a client but he switched to a miles without blackout times fly any airline credit card for a free year. When the year was up they wanted to charge him a fee just as he had redeemed all his rewards sending his kids to Europe.

Just out of curiosity, do you know what the fee was? I'm curious whether the CC company was just stupid or puts-underwear-on-head derpy.


I thought he must have had an American Express Centurion AKA "black" card with a fee of a couple of thousand per year but it was under $150 and he had everyone he talked to pull up his account and verify random monthly totals so that he knew that they knew he wasn't BSing them. Some management "think outside the box" empty suit waste of skin type must have issued an edict that nobody gets their fee waived so don't bother to ask. It's just breath takingly stupid in an industry where it's so easy to change to another company unlike the airlines which are charging $900 to fly to the midwest for Thanksgiving which is more than a RT to Paris costs from LAX
 
2012-11-14 10:24:06 AM

LordOfThePings: Sucks to be banned for cello putting.

[d2tq98mqfjyz2l.cloudfront.net image 500x376]


Apropos of nothing: Instant Cosby
 
2012-11-14 10:36:30 AM

MrDon: As a side thought, I have a cousin who was a flight attendent for a major airline for 38 years.


I'm curious, folklore seems to indicate that flight attendants, due to their job schedule, have a very difficult time forming stable personal relationships--oh sure, stable contact and LTR are possible, but you're going to be erratically apart for extended periods. Family time is hard. Because of this, flight attendants supposedly become socially starved and become very chatty and sexual to an elevated degree (read: easy and eager). I mean let's face it, there's no time to make friends, no time to develop a relationship with anyone, so the only way you're going to get a decent conversation or a good lay is to spend half an hour deciding if some poor sod is a dickbag or not and then jump on his log if he's half decent.

Any truth to the matter?
 
2012-11-14 11:06:43 AM

Endive Wombat: Wait...based off the way I am reading this, Delta is the asshat here, not the OP.

I presume he is paying full price for the second seat that is occupied by the instrument. So, if that is the case, who the fark cares if it is a living, breathing human, dog, pet rock, imaginary friend or musical instrument.

Money is being spent for a second seat and that is that.

What am I missing here?


Yup, what Delta should do is either preclude the cello from getting elite qualifying miles (but still get flight miles) or require the cello to have it's own account. (Allowing the cello to get elite qualifying miles on his account does open up abuse potential.)

NickelP: How did they even know he was doing this? Was he getting boarding passes for it under Mr. Cello or something?


The airlines have no problems with selling a ticket to Cello <Lastname> If you just want more space around you for some reason they'll even sell one to Extraseat <Lastname>. Just don't make up a human name for it so nobody demands id.

gadian: What I hate is that someone (not me, but I've seen it happen) will buy two seats - maybe they need a little extra room or maybe they just don't want anyone immediately beside them or whatever - and the flight attendants will seat someone in the bought and paid for empty seat anyway. I genuinely sympathize with the customer there, it was their extra seat to sit in or not as they pleased and you know they're not going to get a refund for someone else sitting in their seat.


The normal procedure is to put the extra boarding pass on the seat in question to show that it's not available.

The Jami Turman Fan Club: saturn badger: RedVentrue: It bumps a human that might get that seat. If the plane wasn't full, then Delta was the asshat.

Why should that matter? They got paid for the seat.

My dad booked a quartet for a concert, cellist had a ticket, the plane was full, so they bumped the cello. After figuring out that there was no other way to get there on time (it was an international flight), he ended up checking it in baggage. You can guess the rest. Luckily, a local cellist had a nice instrument he could borrow, but it was a million dollar cello.

If I was on a flight, and it was me or somebody's cello, I'd get the hell off the flight. I can survive waiting a few hours.


Huh? Since when can they bump part of a party??
 
2012-11-14 11:29:30 AM

Loren: Huh? Since when can they bump part of a party??


Presumably it was more like "you can check your cello and take this flight, or we can bump both of you to a later flight." Of course, that might be giving the airline too much credit.
 
2012-11-14 01:45:49 PM

cptjeff: gweilo8888: Endive Wombat: Wait...based off the way I am reading this, Delta is the asshat here, not the OP.

I presume he is paying full price for the second seat that is occupied by the instrument. So, if that is the case, who the fark cares if it is a living, breathing human, dog, pet rock, imaginary friend or musical instrument.

Money is being spent for a second seat and that is that.

What am I missing here?

You're missing the fact that it matters not one jot who paid for the seat, the program says the miles go to the occupant of said seat. If I book three seats for myself, my wife, and my child, I don't get to keep all those miles for myself. If this muppet buys seats for himself and his cello, he only gets to accrue miles for himself.

He was aware of the terms, he agreed to them, he's at fault. That simple.

I hate the airlines too nowadays because they're the airlines, but in this case they're not at fault.

The rules are the rules, no matter how utterly moronic and designed to screw people as they are?

\In this state, speeding 20 over results in a sentence of 50 years of hard labor. Sorry, but 'dems the rules.
\\Are you actually incapable of thinking for yourself and using judgement, or are you just faking it?


Actually, it's the very opposite. In this one instance, the rules aren't moronically designed to screw the people. It's the very opposite; they're designed to get the points into the hands of as many people as possible. (Because it is in the airline's interest to do so, making people try to persuade their employers to stick with a specific airline, and making it harder to get large rewards without flying a lot.)

If they didn't require that miles went to the occupant of the seat, your company would (rightfully) expect to keep the miles it paid for. You'd get none.

If the miles could be grouped together for multiple seats on a flight and given to one individual, the most senior employee on the flight would have your seat's miles too as a perk of the job.

The rules are as they are solely to make it so the majority of people will try to fly a specific airline, persuade their company to do the same, and then claim a tiny inconsequential reward or never actually use the miles at all before they expire.

The rules weren't designed for cellos, which tend to have zero brand loyalty.
 
2012-11-14 04:52:39 PM

gweilo8888: Actually, it's the very opposite. In this one instance, the rules aren't moronically designed to screw the people.


Well, yes and no. What you say is actually convincing, though it's not in conflict with the idea that the cello should just be able to maintain its own SkyMiles account, only redeemable by the cello. :-) But I'll ignore that.

The place where Delta seems like it's being a dick is by canceling the guy's accrued miles and banning him from future participation in the program. Maybe if there was some actual abuse (like you say the rules are designed to avoid) it'd make sense to do something like that, but in this case that part of the move comes across as Delta just looking for any "oh good we don't have to give you free stuff any more" escape clause they can find. (Sort of like how insurance companies will happily take your money for years but as soon as you get cancer they'll look for any reason they can to drop your coverage.)
 
2012-11-14 06:35:07 PM

evaned: gweilo8888: Actually, it's the very opposite. In this one instance, the rules aren't moronically designed to screw the people.

Well, yes and no. What you say is actually convincing, though it's not in conflict with the idea that the cello should just be able to maintain its own SkyMiles account, only redeemable by the cello. :-) But I'll ignore that. The place where Delta seems like it's being a dick is by canceling the guy's accrued miles and banning him from future participation in the program.


My understanding is that he's been fiddling it to try and redeem miles accrued by his cello for his own travel (ie. claiming multiple rewards for a single flight). And really, it matters not one jot; he's been warned more than a decade ago that whatever he was doing, he wasn't allowed to do. He continued to do so regardless. That entitles the airline to do whatever they want, as far as I'm concerned.

They're not legally required to provide a frequent flyer scheme in the first place: if they choose to do so, they're well within their rights to set rules for that scheme, and to enforce those rules.
 
2012-11-14 10:02:02 PM

OscarTamerz: My brother in law is COO for a compny that has plants from Alberta to Oaxaca and Pennsylvania to Vegas and puts $15,000 to $20,000 on his credit card every month which is then reimbursed to him by his company. Needless to say you'd think any credit card company would think he's a wet dream of a client but he switched to a miles without blackout times fly any airline credit card for a free year. When the year was up they wanted to charge him a fee just as he had redeemed all his rewards sending his kids to Europe. He talked to everybody he could get on the phone but they were all adamant about him paying the card fee even though he'd spent over $200,000 with them in a year. He ended up canceling the card and they lost tens of thousands of dollars after he went some place else. Corporate mentality is idiotic.


Did the company charge an up front fee for the second year? If he had closed the account before the first year was up, they shouldn't have done that. My guess is he just didn't close it on time.
 
2012-11-14 10:35:13 PM

tenpoundsofcheese: Your Average Witty Fark User: tenpoundsofcheese: Your Average Witty Fark User: Because subtard reads the T&C for EVERYTHING.

Go fark yourself with a rusty rake, subtard.

he was notified a while ago that he wasn't allowed to do this.
he ignored that.

you may not read the T&C, but you could at least read TFA.

I did RTFA. GFY.

Got it.
you read it.
you just didn't understand it.

I forgive you!


I did read the story, and I fully understand it too. Reading comprehension. I have it. You don't.

My comment had little to do with the story, and much more to do with the fact that I'm suuuuuuure subtard (that's you) reads all his T&C's.

Idiot.
 
2012-11-15 11:29:10 PM

OscarTamerz: He talked to everybody he could get on the phone but they were all adamant about him paying the card fee even though he'd spent over $200,000 with them in a year. He ended up canceling the card and they lost tens of thousands of dollars after he went some place else.


Over the summer, one of my co-workers was trying to nail down a mortgage refinance with his bank (I think it was Fifth Third). They were dragging the process out to the point where the refi was getting less and less worth it to him since he was planning to sell pretty soon anyway. At the same time he had a car loan that he was about to be able to pay off early, but it would cost him an early payoff fee. He'd been a Fifth Third customer his entire adult life, used them for every loan he took out, has great credit, etc. so he figured maybe they'd cut him a break.

Called them up and asked for the payoff fee to be waived. Got a polite "no sir, can't do that." So he said "Let me put it in these terms -- I've got a refinance in process with you guys, and if you won't waive this fee I'm going to cancel it." (This is a no-brainer, right? Hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of practically guaranteed interest vs. a piddly payoff fee.)

Their response was "well you'd have to talk to the mortgage division about that." Um, no, they can't do anything about waiving your division's fee. Etc. etc.

After an hour of transfers and escalations and hearing "no" every time, he finally gave up, paid off the car loan, ate the payoff fee, canceled the refi, and closed all his accounts there.
 
Displayed 20 of 120 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report