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(Herald Tribune (SW Florida))   You might think that electrical outlet next to a picnic table in the park is there for public use. Think again. It's a trap   (heraldtribune.com) divider line 265
    More: Florida, picnic tables, Darren Kersey, Sarasota Police Department, National Coalition for the Homeless, pavilions, Anthony Frangioni  
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28725 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Nov 2012 at 10:55 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-12 11:22:33 PM
maybe it was an ObamaPhone!

Seriously, sounds like this a-hole cop got a paycut because of declining tax revenues related to reduced property values, and wants to project that anger onto liberals, democrats, homeless ne'r-do-wells, and immigrants. (or as he probably refers to them in at cop poker night as "dirty Mexicans"). 

Here's a hint, chief, the problem isn't the homeless stealing half a cent of power, it's the rich a-holes stealing millions and you are to stupid and obsequious to figure out you're fighting the wrong battle.
 
2012-11-12 11:22:46 PM

This About That: OK, let's suppose this cop was an asshole (which he would kind-of have to be to roust a homeless guy for 2 cents worth of electricity. Still, self preservation requires an understanding of the situation. You have to understand it from the cop's point of view. The cop is going to win. The less sh*t you talk, the less his winning will cost you. That seems pretty simple. Now consider the case when a cop encounters s pet dog. The dog is not smarter than the cop, so he doesn't know what danger it is in, but it has mastered the art of reading voice tone and body language in humans. It sees a belligerent human and reacts correctly, warning the belligerent human away. Belligerent human shoots the dog, even if it weigh 2 pounds and is no real threat. This is because the copy has to win. Has to. If he doesn't he will be back with 20 cops and heavy weapons. So, unless it is your mission to lose in the game of life to cops, just shut the hell up and unplug your phone. Be smarter than the dog.You can usually (no, really, kids) assume that the cop is doing his in a difficult job, as he sees it. Even if you think he is a jerk, give him the benefit of the doubt. Usually he deserves it, and if he doesn't, you will lose anyhow. Beyond that, argue the point with the nice folks on your local city council.


Your argument misses one key point, not everyone considers going to jail as a bad thing.

He had at least one night sleeping under a roof and most likely had at least two meals. We're not talking about prison here. We're talking about a local jail which could very well be nicer than any other place he'd spent the night in some time. All for the cost of having a misdemeanor on his record.
 
2012-11-12 11:23:19 PM
This About That

I do not understand this seemingly irresistible urge to mouth off to a cop.

You explain white knighting these law breaking bullies and I'll explain the mouthing off.
 
2012-11-12 11:26:58 PM
In Davis, Ca. they have (had?) prominent "No Loitering" signs posted by the picnic tables/bbq area in the so-called "Community Park". That one always made me shake my head...
 
2012-11-12 11:27:11 PM

sparkeyjames: The thing that disturbs me most about this article is that there is a disabled homeless person
living in a public park. Does not Social Security disability cover a person who is disabled by a stroke?


This is America, we don't allow socialism here. Especially since Romney won the election (assuming you only count votes from Real Americans.)
 
2012-11-12 11:27:11 PM
Darren Kersey, 28, was charged with theft of utilities after Sarasota Police Sgt. Anthony Frangioni spotted him charging his phone at about 9:20 p.m. Sunday. Unable to come up with the $500 bail for the misdemeanor, Kersey had no choice but to stay in jail.

In his arrest report, Frangioni wrote that he told Kersey that the "theft of city utilities will not be tolerated during this bad economy." Frangioni also told Kersey that he should charge his phone at local shelters, according to the report.


/Hello..morans? It will cost the city thousands of dollars to house and feed this person, vs. the 20 cents it probably cost to charge his phone on a outlet nobody was using. Are you farking stupid? Jesus Christ, who is in charge of the idiot who ordered this person arrested? Why not just figure out how much it cost to charge his phone....(not much I'm guessing) and bill him for that? Sighs..stupid is as stupid does.
 
2012-11-12 11:27:15 PM

Mija: sparkeyjames: The thing that disturbs me most about this article is that there is a disabled homeless person
living in a public park. Does not Social Security disability cover a person who is disabled by a stroke?

You cannot live on the small amount that disability pays. In many staes you have to wait years for housing assistance. If you have a criminal record of any kind you could be denied. I have worked with the homeless. Don't you forget either that Republicans don't even want the homeless to have help with phones. Without a phone you cannot get help or work.


Yes, I have an elderly relative who receives $620 per month in disability. Her monthly probation payment is $330 per month. She is supposed to support herself on the remainder. As a felon, she does not qualify for most government housing.
 
2012-11-12 11:27:25 PM

Oznog: Charlie Freak: Didn't I hear it costs less an $1/year to charge an iPhone? "In this bad economy" my ass. As long as they're not causing a disturbance and yield to anyone who has reserved the shelter, let them charge away.

Electricity costs about $0.10/KWH here. The iPhone battery is 3.7v at 1.44 amp-hrs, or 0.0053 KWH. Let's say the charging process is only 50% efficient- he still only used all of A TENTH OF A PENNY of electricity here, presuming it was a full charge. $0.0010656, to be exact.

I hope this measure against the freeloading homeless has fixed your budget crunch. Asshole.


...and it had cost the city literally 10000X as much in tax payer money just for the douchebag cop to spend an hour or so of his time and the gas he took to travel to arrest the homeless guy.
 
2012-11-12 11:27:47 PM

Maktaka: sparkeyjames: This About That: I do not understand this seemingly irresistible urge to mouth off to a cop.

I think it's closely related to mouthing off to an asshole when one gets in your face.

You know who else enjoys shouting at assholes?

[seoulbeats.com image 471x316]


My god sir, bravo I say. Bravo!!!
 
2012-11-12 11:27:50 PM
A homeless man spent the night in jail Sunday after police arrested him for charging his cellphone in a public picnic shelter

Well, look on the bright side: he now has a roof over his head and free meals!

Is incarceration really cheaper than letting him use the fricking outlet?
 
2012-11-12 11:28:07 PM

Philbb: He had at least one night sleeping under a roof and most likely had at least two meals. We're not talking about prison here. We're talking about a local jail which could very well be nicer than any other place he'd spent the night in some time. All for the cost of having a misdemeanor on his record.


Having a misdemeanor on your record, or even an arrest nowadays, pretty much guarantees he will never be able to leave a life of homelessness.

It will disqualify him from shelters, public assistance, and nearly all jobs.
 
2012-11-12 11:28:35 PM

This About That: OK, let's suppose this cop was an asshole (which he would kind-of have to be to roust a homeless guy for 2 cents worth of electricity. Still, self preservation requires an understanding of the situation. You have to understand it from the cop's point of view. The cop is going to win. The less sh*t you talk, the less his winning will cost you. That seems pretty simple. Now consider the case when a cop encounters s pet dog. The dog is not smarter than the cop, so he doesn't know what danger it is in, but it has mastered the art of reading voice tone and body language in humans. It sees a belligerent human and reacts correctly, warning the belligerent human away. Belligerent human shoots the dog, even if it weigh 2 pounds and is no real threat. This is because the copy has to win. Has to. If he doesn't he will be back with 20 cops and heavy weapons. So, unless it is your mission to lose in the game of life to cops, just shut the hell up and unplug your phone. Be smarter than the dog.You can usually (no, really, kids) assume that the cop is doing his in a difficult job, as he sees it. Even if you think he is a jerk, give him the benefit of the doubt. Usually he deserves it, and if he doesn't, you will lose anyhow. Beyond that, argue the point with the nice folks on your local city council.


You never closed your first paren, so I kept reading your paragraph and waiting for you to get back to a main point. Very frustrating.
 
2012-11-12 11:28:36 PM

Smingleigh: If we let a homeless person charge his or her phone with public electricity, what next? Can they moor their yachts on public piers? Should they land their planes on public airfields? It's a slippery slope, and there isn't an easy answer to the problem.


You jest, but the boat issue actually came up in Sarasota recently. We have a small public bay where many "boat people" (think homeless people with shiatty little boats) moor their vessels. The city was trying to charge exorbitant mooring fees to rid themselves of the undesirables.

The city also took all the benches out of a popular public park because people in a nearby condo complained that homeless people were using the benches.

Sarasota, both the city and the elderly retirees, farking hate poor people.
 
2012-11-12 11:28:56 PM
Phone charged and place to sleep but did he get breakfast?
 
2012-11-12 11:31:23 PM
I wonder how much it costs the city to process, photograph, book, and house the guy overnight in the local jail. Compared to the few cents of electricity he used for his phone. Honestly, if you hate homeless people deputy Fife, just admit it.
 
2012-11-12 11:32:12 PM
Have the homeless guy offer the cop a nickel to pay his share for the month.
 
2012-11-12 11:32:32 PM
How long before the homeless have their own MLK?
 
2012-11-12 11:32:52 PM

Philbb: He had at least one night sleeping under a roof and most likely had at least two meals. We're not talking about prison here. We're talking about a local jail which could very well be nicer than any other place he'd spent the night in some time. All for the cost of having a misdemeanor on his record.


he doesn't have anything on his record, the judge threw it out
 
2012-11-12 11:33:10 PM
"If I sit down, they come up, ask for ID and run my name," said Fred Hall, 51, a North Carolina native. "If I spread a blanket and read a book, they arrest me for sleeping. It's crazy. They do the weirdest things to us."

It's almost as if the city doesn't want vagrants squatting in the public parks...
 
2012-11-12 11:33:18 PM
I lived on the streets in Edmonton for a couple of weeks in 2008 and charged my phone at public outlets all over the downtown area. I never once was harassed by a cop, though I did see a few around.
 
2012-11-12 11:33:25 PM
drewogatory
In Davis, Ca. they have (had?) prominent "No Loitering" signs posted by the picnic tables/bbq area in the so-called "Community Park". That one always made me shake my head...


They meant to post "No Littering" signs but the "No Loitering" ones were on sale and in this bad economy..
 
2012-11-12 11:35:56 PM

dopekitty74: I lived on the streets in Edmonton for a couple of weeks in 2008


I hope it was in the summer.
 
2012-11-12 11:36:26 PM
What is it with these cops? Haven't they read their Marx and Engels?
 
2012-11-12 11:36:40 PM

This About That: I do not understand this seemingly irresistible urge to mouth off to a cop.


The first 11 times I get harassed by a dick with a badge when I'm doing nothing illegal, I will be all no sir, I'm sorry sir, thank you.

The twelfth time I might "mouth off".
 
2012-11-12 11:36:56 PM

OnlyM3: This About That

I do not understand this seemingly irresistible urge to mouth off to a cop.
You explain white knighting these law breaking bullies and I'll explain the mouthing off.


We pay police to enforce laws that we vote on, or empower our elected officials to enact, because we feel that these laws are necessary to the functioning of our society. And we empower the police to enforce these laws because we as society don't want a bunch of bums, thugs and teenagers hanging around the park all day long, endlessly recharging their phones, iPods and computers on electricity that we the taxpayers ultimately pay for. Now, usually, people told "Don't plug in your phone at that outlet, it's not for public use," will say "Sorry, officer, I didn't realize it," or at worst, mutter, "Screw you, pig" under their breath, while they unplug their device, and move on.

SOME people seem to think that they have to do more than that. These are the ones the cops wind up arresting, beating, and often doing worse than that to. I have to admit, I don't get it either. Nobody likes being told what to do; but then nobody likes going to jail either. Is it really so hard to just say "Sorry, I didn't realize it," and move on? Is it really so hard to be polite for two minutes and NOT ARGUE as opposed to screaming at a guy who, whatever philosophical differences you've got with the police, has no power to change the law he is paid to enforce? If your options are a) be polite and don't go to jail or b) piss off the cop and go to jail, why pick b)?

I await your answer with interest.
 
2012-11-12 11:38:55 PM
TFA left out the part where he broke out the power strip and plugged in his fridge, flatscreen and microwave too
 
2012-11-12 11:38:56 PM
If the city didn't want its outlets being used, they could simply have shut off the power.

Then the man wouldn't have received a charge.
 
2012-11-12 11:39:23 PM

LoneVVolf: It's almost as if the city doesn't want vagrants squatting in the public parks...


Surely the police could be doing something better than making sure a homeless guy isn't sitting on a park bench.
 
2012-11-12 11:39:43 PM

LoneVVolf: "If I sit down, they come up, ask for ID and run my name," said Fred Hall, 51, a North Carolina native. "If I spread a blanket and read a book, they arrest me for sleeping. It's crazy. They do the weirdest things to us."

It's almost as if the city doesn't want vagrants squatting in the public parks...


So of course the homeless should just get jobs and houses, because that is at all possible. How well do you think an interview goes with someone who hasn't had soap to use or a proper shower in weeks? Framing the conversation in terms of "vagrants" and "squatting" just shows contempt. Where should they go? Get a hotel room?
 
2012-11-12 11:40:12 PM
The best thing about dating a homeless person is when the date is over, you can pretty much drop them off anywhere.
 
2012-11-12 11:40:49 PM

poot_rootbeer: This About That: I do not understand this seemingly irresistible urge to mouth off to a cop.

The first 11 times I get harassed by a dick with a badge when I'm doing nothing illegal, I will be all no sir, I'm sorry sir, thank you.

The twelfth time I might "mouth off".


unless you're guilty of being black, what the fark are you doing to get harassed by the cops 11 times?
 
2012-11-12 11:41:00 PM

dopekitty74: I lived on the streets in Edmonton for a couple of weeks in 2008 and charged my phone at public outlets all over the downtown area. I never once was harassed by a cop, though I did see a few around.


I imagine getting harassed by a Canuckistani cop would start with the phrase, "Excuse me sir, I hate to interrupt you, but I would appreciate it if I could discuss something with you..."

/Canadian stereotypes
 
2012-11-12 11:41:27 PM

shtychkn: fanbladesaresharp: In his arrest report, Frangioni wrote that he told Kersey that the "theft of city utilities will not be tolerated during this bad economy."

Oh what the fark ever, Sgt. A-Hole. Perhaps you should unplug that coffee pot at the station. No one was using it, and it just sucks up taxpayer-paid city utilities.

Go bark up another tree. You busted a guy with no home or money. Well aren't you goddamn special.

Enough money to pay for phone service it seems.


A lot of homeless where I live get public benefits. They have a "Cash" and "food" side on their EBT cards. They use the cash sides to pay for those TracPhones I see a lot of them with. Others have a phone given to them and paid for by a third party. So.....your money is paying the government, to give the homeless money to pay for a phone that he uses a government service to be arrested over. Clearly it's the homeless guy that's sucking up all our resources here.

/ya i know you were being sarcastic. I hope.
 
2012-11-12 11:41:34 PM

LoneVVolf: It's almost as if the city doesn't want vagrants squatting in the public parks...


We've spend the last few decades punishing the homeless. And look how well it's worked out!

Oh wait...
 
2012-11-12 11:41:48 PM

Gyrfalcon: OnlyM3: This About That

I do not understand this seemingly irresistible urge to mouth off to a cop.
You explain white knighting these law breaking bullies and I'll explain the mouthing off.

We pay police to enforce laws that we vote on, or empower our elected officials to enact, because we feel that these laws are necessary to the functioning of our society. And we empower the police to enforce these laws because we as society don't want a bunch of bums, thugs and teenagers hanging around the park all day long, endlessly recharging their phones, iPods and computers on electricity that we the taxpayers ultimately pay for. Now, usually, people told "Don't plug in your phone at that outlet, it's not for public use," will say "Sorry, officer, I didn't realize it," or at worst, mutter, "Screw you, pig" under their breath, while they unplug their device, and move on.

SOME people seem to think that they have to do more than that. These are the ones the cops wind up arresting, beating, and often doing worse than that to. I have to admit, I don't get it either. Nobody likes being told what to do; but then nobody likes going to jail either. Is it really so hard to just say "Sorry, I didn't realize it," and move on? Is it really so hard to be polite for two minutes and NOT ARGUE as opposed to screaming at a guy who, whatever philosophical differences you've got with the police, has no power to change the law he is paid to enforce? If your options are a) be polite and don't go to jail or b) piss off the cop and go to jail, why pick b)?

I await your answer with interest.


Its against the law to arrest someone on trumped up charges for an obviously minor and harmless act.

The arrest itself was illegal.
 
2012-11-12 11:42:02 PM

LavenderWolf: LoneVVolf: "If I sit down, they come up, ask for ID and run my name," said Fred Hall, 51, a North Carolina native. "If I spread a blanket and read a book, they arrest me for sleeping. It's crazy. They do the weirdest things to us."

It's almost as if the city doesn't want vagrants squatting in the public parks...

So of course the homeless should just get jobs and houses, because that is at all possible. How well do you think an interview goes with someone who hasn't had soap to use or a proper shower in weeks? Framing the conversation in terms of "vagrants" and "squatting" just shows contempt. Where should they go? Get a hotel room?


why can't they just spend the night at the club like everyone else does when they're getting their place gold plated? Farking lack of ingenuity, that's the problem
 
2012-11-12 11:42:56 PM

fanbladesaresharp: shtychkn: fanbladesaresharp: In his arrest report, Frangioni wrote that he told Kersey that the "theft of city utilities will not be tolerated during this bad economy."

Oh what the fark ever, Sgt. A-Hole. Perhaps you should unplug that coffee pot at the station. No one was using it, and it just sucks up taxpayer-paid city utilities.

Go bark up another tree. You busted a guy with no home or money. Well aren't you goddamn special.

Enough money to pay for phone service it seems.

A lot of homeless where I live get public benefits. They have a "Cash" and "food" side on their EBT cards. They use the cash sides to pay for those TracPhones I see a lot of them with. Others have a phone given to them and paid for by a third party. So.....your money is paying the government, to give the homeless money to pay for a phone that he uses a government service to be arrested over. Clearly it's the homeless guy that's sucking up all our resources here.

/ya i know you were being sarcastic. I hope.


I'd be using my cash side on booze, that's what I'd be using it on. Fark a phone
 
2012-11-12 11:43:21 PM

Gyrfalcon: If your options are a) be polite and don't go to jail or b) piss off the cop and go to jail, why pick b)?


Because sometimes the cop is just throwing his weight around and being a power-tripping dick? I'm not homeless and about as straight as they come, but I've experienced it a few times. Respect earns respect and some officials have no idea how to treat people with respect.
 
2012-11-12 11:43:41 PM

numbone: Phone charged and place to sleep but did he get breakfast?


You obviously slept in a Holiday Inn Express last night. I hadn't even thought of breakfast.
 
2012-11-12 11:44:34 PM
They should charge him with battery.
 
2012-11-12 11:45:02 PM

whatshisname: dopekitty74: I lived on the streets in Edmonton for a couple of weeks in 2008

I hope it was in the summer.


Yeah, it was in july. Also, I had a tent set up in the valley. Went to the wading pool at the Legislature every day to keep fresh, brushed my teeth and did my actual body washing in the public wheelchair washroom (lockable single room affair) charged phone in all sorts of random locations. It was actually pretty fun. I'd class it as urban camping, rather than being homeless.
 
2012-11-12 11:45:34 PM
If anyone read the arrest report you would know the cop WALKED out of the substation and saw a group of people smoking what appeared to be, omg, marijuana. the cop then arrested him for smoking in a park, a clear violation of city codes. Altho i find arresting instead of ticketing a bit heavyhanded. Then after the arrest the dude asks the cop to get his phone and the cop sees that it is charging on the other side of the power pole and that the COVER was broken off. Now I'm not one to take a cops side very often but i believe the cop could have most likely arrested everybody there and charged them with destruction of govt property! and might have got a conviction!
 
2012-11-12 11:45:49 PM
Arrest is virtually equivalent to conviction to many employers. Welcome to the electronic plantation.

/yea i read the book too
 
2012-11-12 11:45:57 PM

smitty04: Hollywood discovered that if you are helpful towards the homeless, they start congregating in your parks. Word travels fast.


If you dont want to step over the homeless and/or their feces, stay out of the parks.

Problem solved.
 
2012-11-12 11:46:15 PM

Gyrfalcon: We pay police to enforce laws that we vote on, or empower our elected officials to enact, because we feel that these laws are necessary to the functioning of our society. And we empower the police to enforce these laws because we as society don't want a bunch of bums, thugs and teenagers hanging around the park all day long, endlessly recharging their phones, iPods and computers on electricity that we the taxpayers ultimately pay for. Now, usually, people told "Don't plug in your phone at that outlet, it's not for public use," will say "Sorry, officer, I didn't realize it," or at worst, mutter, "Screw you, pig" under their breath, while they unplug their device, and move on.


Since the judge threw out the charges as meritless, it sort of seems like your whole explanation is derived from a false pretense.
 
2012-11-12 11:46:50 PM
I kind of skimmed through the comments, but did anyone ask why a homeless guy has a phone? How does he pay for it? Who is he expecting calls from? Is it an Obamaphone, because I'm pretty sure you still need a real address for those.

I'm hopefully that he got it because he's expecting a call back on some applications he's filled out, but the cynic in me doubts that
 
2012-11-12 11:46:55 PM

HempHead: The best thing about dating a homeless person is when the date is over, you can pretty much drop them off anywhere.


Sarah Silverman? I can't remember who did that joke.
 
2012-11-12 11:47:45 PM

whatshisname: Gyrfalcon: If your options are a) be polite and don't go to jail or b) piss off the cop and go to jail, why pick b)?

Because sometimes the cop is just throwing his weight around and being a power-tripping dick? I'm not homeless and about as straight as they come, but I've experienced it a few times. Respect earns respect and some officials have no idea how to treat people with respect.


I think Officers are frequently provocative in hopes they get a rise of you and have an excuse to beat you.

For example, I just farking love getting called "boy" by an Officer half my age.
 
2012-11-12 11:48:03 PM

Zombalupagus: [i.imm.io image 403x403]


Please tell me that's not an instagram pic. I really want to like it.
 
2012-11-12 11:48:59 PM

EKU Colonel: I kind of skimmed through the comments, but did anyone ask why a homeless guy has a phone? How does he pay for it? Who is he expecting calls from? Is it an Obamaphone, because I'm pretty sure you still need a real address for those.

I'm hopefully that he got it because he's expecting a call back on some applications he's filled out, but the cynic in me doubts that


How else is he gonna vote on American Idol?
 
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