If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   Turns out no one knows why Manhattan's tunnels have not been protected from easily predicted waves. And it seems protection from floods is pretty easy too, and many other cities have done so   (nytimes.com) divider line 67
    More: Stupid, flood controls, Manhattan, catastrophic failure, floods, Hurricane Irene, engineering research  
•       •       •

7015 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Nov 2012 at 8:24 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



67 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-11-10 12:25:48 PM
I love all of the armchair engineers in this thread. Yeah, guys, I'm sure you know exactly what should have been done.
 
2012-11-10 12:30:25 PM
CHUDS can't swim so easy fix to the problem.
 
2012-11-10 12:37:11 PM
My guess would be that some kind of special interest group would have some sort of problem with something that someone wanted to do that might have done something that could have prevented some kind of problem.
So nothing was done.
Its the New Yorkers way.

Suck it common sensers
 
2012-11-10 12:40:07 PM

Shvetz: PC LOAD LETTER: Because the water was higher than any time in recorded history?

Over in one. Probably the same reason they don't shield the subway from volcano damage. It took nearly a century for this to become an issue. The water pumps they had installed worked fine, but were installed before anybody on Fark was born.


Its a farking island.
 
2012-11-10 12:40:31 PM

foo monkey: Article says it bled off 100 million gallons of flood water from Brooklyn and Battery Park. I wonder how much that helped above ground.

My office building on Water Street will be closed for months and likely condemned.


You're either in my office building or in one of the neighboring ones. Which one are they saying might be condemned?

Working from home is already getting old...
 
2012-11-10 01:03:52 PM

clintp: What pisses me off about this is that the idea of "recovery" has taken a backseat to defense. No-one thinks about just rebuilding, repairing, or fixing things anymore. Some things just aren't cost-effective to defend against!

Accept the fact that the tunnels may flood. Make them easy to pump out and clean afterward -- it's a lot cheaper and easier from an engineering standpoint. For the once in a hundred years event, close the tunnels for the event, repair them as needed, and open them again.

As a side-benefit, if another kind of leak happens in the tunnel -- chemical spill, fuel spill, broken pipe, etc.. -- you're already prepared.



Kinda what I'm thinking.  You wan to protect houses and buildings from flood damage... but no one lives in the tunnels, and it seems that if they fill up, they can easily be pumped later with minimal damage.
 
2012-11-10 01:57:48 PM

orbister: The Irresponsible Captain: After a close call during Hurricane Katrina, Mobile, Ala., rejiggered the ventilation system of a major tunnel

I always thought that was a racist slur. Even if it's not, that's a very unprofessional way to say it. Did the editor fall asleep?

The word is "rejigged" (from rejig), surely? To be jiggered is to be surprise or astounded: "Well, I'm jiggered".


I always thought it was related to Jigaboo
 
2012-11-10 04:23:58 PM
Fun fact: The east river tunnels into Penn station actually DO have flood doors. Amtrak didn't close them this time. Why? They don't work - Amtrak never tests or maintains them. Then again, this is the same organization that literally burns its own bridges, so what do you expect.

A lot of subway/metro systems have flood doors, and IMHO it's high time the NYCTA looks into them. But it's only a partial solution - here the other big problem was the storm surge flooded the system because it reached a number or stations in the city and just flowed in that way.

Nonetheless, the NYC subway bounced back amazingly fast (it pretty much had to). Ditto for the LIRR and Metro-North. NJ Transit, on the other hand, is still royally farked up. But that's what you expect from NJT. SEPTA makes them look good most of the time...
 
2012-11-10 05:43:06 PM

MutinousDoug: Wasn't Wall Street named Wall St for the wall that separated the wet side from the dry side?
Maybe I just hallucinated that memory?


From Wikipedia:

There are varying accounts about how the Dutch-named "de Waal Straat" got its name. A generally accepted version is that the name of the street was derived from an earthen wall on the northern boundary of the New Amsterdam settlement, perhaps to protect against English colonial encroachment or incursions by native Americans. A conflicting explanation is that Wall Street was named after Walloons-possibly a Dutch abbreviation for Walloon being Waal Among the first settlers that embarked on the ship "Nieu Nederlandt" in 1624 were 30 Walloon families.

http://mimg.ugo.com/200808/22174/cuts/nicolas-cage-national-treasure_ 2 88x288.jpg
 
2012-11-10 05:43:17 PM

DerAppie: The US has 3rd world infrastructure which is held together by luck, magical thinking and unicorn farts. Nothing new here.


You know what, THIS a thousand times. When I heard that the generators of the hospitals failed I thought: "that's what happens when you have no regulations or standards". How can emergency back-up generators fail during an emergency?! Did someone forget to fill them up with gas? Were they not tested before the storm hit!?
 
2012-11-10 06:09:50 PM

Franko: You know what, THIS a thousand times. When I heard that the generators of the hospitals failed I thought: "that's what happens when you have no regulations or standards". How can emergency back-up generators fail during an emergency?! Did someone forget to fill them up with gas? Were they not tested before the storm hit!?


Happens here (UK) too. There have been several cases recently when hospitals have lost their grid supply and discovered that the emergency generators don't. Sure, they get looked at now and again, and maybe even started for a few minutes, but there probably isn't any way of testing them at anything near service load.
 
2012-11-10 06:11:24 PM

PC LOAD LETTER: Because the water was higher than any time in recorded history?


FTFA: But water levels on the southern end of Manhattan have risen about nine inches since the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel was opened in 1940. It is a significant increase, since its entrance is just a few feet above sea level.
 
2012-11-10 06:17:52 PM

Franko: DerAppie: The US has 3rd world infrastructure which is held together by luck, magical thinking and unicorn farts. Nothing new here.

You know what, THIS a thousand times. When I heard that the generators of the hospitals failed I thought: "that's what happens when you have no regulations or standards". How can emergency back-up generators fail during an emergency?! Did someone forget to fill them up with gas? Were they not tested before the storm hit!?


Not just that. I regularly read about wide spread blackouts in the US after some random lbadl weather. I have had one unscheduled period wihout power inthe last 3 years. It lasted 30 minutes.
 
2012-11-10 06:51:34 PM

orbister: Franko: You know what, THIS a thousand times. When I heard that the generators of the hospitals failed I thought: "that's what happens when you have no regulations or standards". How can emergency back-up generators fail during an emergency?! Did someone forget to fill them up with gas? Were they not tested before the storm hit!?

Happens here (UK) too. There have been several cases recently when hospitals have lost their grid supply and discovered that the emergency generators don't. Sure, they get looked at now and again, and maybe even started for a few minutes, but there probably isn't any way of testing them at anything near service load.


Hmmmmm. Desalinization plant that provides emergency pumping. That makes a little too much sense right now. I must step away.
 
2012-11-10 08:21:07 PM
Let's see, the mayor and governor our proponents of global warming and rising sea levels and yet they did nothing to stop this non-global warming event. Hmmmm.....
 
2012-11-10 09:19:47 PM

DrPainMD: You know you're doing it wrong when Alabama laughs at you.


I was going to say. The 2 tunnels downtown... they just close a day ahead of time and pack the entrances with sand bags.

Admittedly, it's a low tech approach, but usually they are open again the day after the storm surge subsides.
 
2012-11-11 01:08:29 AM

leevis: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Because America needs more aircraft carriers!

It's not America's job to stop flooding in New York's tunnels, it's New York's job.


No. It's America's job. We're one country.
 
Displayed 17 of 67 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report