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(BBC-US)   Have you ever had the impression that after years of standing in the same place, objects are harder to slide to a new position? You're not just imagining it. Here comes the science   (bbc.com) divider line 30
    More: Interesting, chemical bonds, materials science, surface tension, silica, logarithms, water vapors, thin films  
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8245 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Nov 2012 at 8:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-10 08:28:43 AM  
Because lacquer and paint and varnish.
 
2012-11-10 08:29:53 AM  
Science failed to explain issues of human and sitting on couch.
 
2012-11-10 08:35:07 AM  
not available in the UK
 
2012-11-10 08:45:50 AM  
We talking the Republican party?
 
2012-11-10 09:10:25 AM  
derp in 4
 
2012-11-10 09:29:20 AM  
Is this why I can't get my fat ass out of in front of my computer?
 
2012-11-10 10:01:19 AM  
Who are these people that can't trust their own observations? They must be the type that go along with the crowd in those peer pressure experiments where everyone claims a blue thing is a green thing.
 
2012-11-10 10:16:15 AM  

Agarista: not available in the UK


It is annoying that we can't see it but...
 
2012-11-10 10:19:46 AM  
That article was incredibly boring.
 
2012-11-10 10:47:39 AM  
FARKing time-dependence of the coefficient of static friction, how does it work?
 
2012-11-10 11:05:56 AM  

lewismarktwo: Who are these people that can't trust their own observations? They must be the type that go along with the crowd in those peer pressure experiments where everyone claims a blue thing is a green thing.


I think you're mistaking 'trust' for 'explain'. I doubt anyone here would've guessed 'oxygen bridging' was one of the reasons for the observed increase in apparent friction. The creep-induced sag of asperites is what came to mind for me (but that's only because I took a class in materials engineering). Otherwise, I think I'd've guessed flood crud and moisture creating a sticky goo, at least for things like appliances (things like cushion floor dents notwithstanding).
 
2012-11-10 11:09:44 AM  
It's called static friction. It'll get easier once it starts moving.
 
2012-11-10 11:47:39 AM  

Honest Bender: It's called static friction. It'll get easier once it starts moving.


Good thing you took that freshman mechanics course.
 
2012-11-10 11:50:26 AM  

lewismarktwo: Who are these people that can't trust their own observations? They must be the type that go along with the crowd in those peer pressure experiments where everyone claims a blue thing is a green thing.


No. They trust their observations, they just want to know why it happens.
 
2012-11-10 12:16:18 PM  

Loomy: lewismarktwo: Who are these people that can't trust their own observations? They must be the type that go along with the crowd in those peer pressure experiments where everyone claims a blue thing is a green thing.

I think you're mistaking 'trust' for 'explain'. I doubt anyone here would've guessed 'oxygen bridging' was one of the reasons for the observed increase in apparent friction. The creep-induced sag of asperites is what came to mind for me (but that's only because I took a class in materials engineering). Otherwise, I think I'd've guessed flood crud and moisture creating a sticky goo, at least for things like appliances (things like cushion floor dents notwithstanding).


I thought the answer was going to be that since even relative solid object are made of atoms (which are constantly in motion), the atoms from adjoining objects merge over time.
 
2012-11-10 01:14:50 PM  

gilatrout: Is this why I can't get my fat ass out of in front of my computer?


Sedentary becomes Sedimentary.
 
2012-11-10 02:15:40 PM  
It's because of the dents in the shag carpeting (they make flooring for every ocassion!).
 
2012-11-10 02:18:36 PM  
I was expecting some kind of riff over the chair slat/nut incident...


/leaving unsatisfied...

(cue "that's what she said" )
 
2012-11-10 02:37:06 PM  

RedVentrue: gilatrout: Is this why I can't get my fat ass out of in front of my computer?

Sedentary becomes Sedimentary.



My sediments exactly.
 
2012-11-10 03:02:46 PM  
I have noticed that the fatter the ass, the more of tendency it has to stay in one place.
 
2012-11-10 03:15:27 PM  

lewismarktwo: Who are these people that can't trust their own observations? They must be the type that go along with the crowd in those peer pressure experiments where everyone claims a blue thing is a green thing.


:)
 
2012-11-10 03:18:43 PM  
I'm going with "glued to the floor by a thick paste of dried beer, insect parts, and shed human skin".
 
2012-11-10 04:20:21 PM  
with each passing 'amazing science' article i grow to hate scientists just a little more

ausfahrk: I'm going with "glued to the floor by a thick paste of dried beer, insect parts, and shed human skin".


dingdingdingdingding!
 
2012-11-10 04:51:52 PM  

lewismarktwo: Who are these people that can't trust their own observations? They must be the type that go along with the crowd in those peer pressure experiments where everyone claims a blue thing is a green thing.


Like the color of older Cisco switches?
 
2012-11-10 06:18:47 PM  

OnlyM3: derp in 4


Yea, but it makes it a hell of a lot easier to ignore them.

/Have lot of people ignored as 'Political Douche bag' for a reason.
 
2012-11-10 09:16:24 PM  

Loomy: I think you're mistaking 'trust' for 'explain'. I doubt anyone here would've guessed 'oxygen bridging' was one of the reasons for the observed increase in apparent friction.


*slowly raises hand*

In the case of silica it'd have been my first or second conjecture, that's one of the aspects that makes the material's surface interesting to begin with. Then, I kinda do it for a living and actually wasn't bored reading the article, though none of it particularly surprised me.
 
2012-11-11 12:10:41 AM  
This seems to be related to something I call "destructive friction". You can even measure it in cases like spinning tires on a car since it has different properties than static and kinetic friction.
 
2012-11-11 05:22:59 PM  
naturalishistoria.files.wordpress.com

/meh
 
2012-11-11 05:29:23 PM  
Ever try to keep a rug on a rug?
 
2012-11-11 06:08:36 PM  
There's a way to speed this molecular bonding mentioned in the article:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
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