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(Grantland)   Ever wondered how Marvel Comics evolved from publishing boring Captain America to Trippy Cosmic Captain Marvel, Psychedelic Doctor Strange and Kung-Fu Fighting Shang-Chi? Yeah, it's because they were all tripping balls   (grantland.com) divider line 42
    More: Spiffy, Doctor Strange, Kung-Fu Fighting Shang-Chi, Marvel Comics, Captain America, Shang-Chi, David Carradine, chi, Elo  
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2646 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Nov 2012 at 12:32 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-09 11:15:08 AM
The drug use reached its breaking point in the mid-1970s, when someone said "Let's make a book called Giant-Size Man-Thing", and no one disagreed.

images2.wikia.nocookie.net

Drug Testing policies were instituted immediately afterward.
 
2012-11-09 12:41:47 PM
What's with linking to PAGE 2 of an article?

Seems to happen a lot on Fark. Link to page 1, that's where normals start reading.
 
2012-11-09 12:44:17 PM

FirstNationalBastard: The drug use reached its breaking point in the mid-1970s, when someone said "Let's make a book called Giant-Size Man-Thing", and no one disagreed.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x609]

Drug Testing policies were instituted immediately afterward.



Of course you know that Giant-Size is a description of the book (68 pages) and not the Man-Thing himself.
 
2012-11-09 12:44:50 PM
i.imgur.com

wow...dude....infinity ... just think about it .... man
 
2012-11-09 12:45:27 PM

Christian Bale: FirstNationalBastard: The drug use reached its breaking point in the mid-1970s, when someone said "Let's make a book called Giant-Size Man-Thing", and no one disagreed.

[images2.wikia.nocookie.net image 400x609]

Drug Testing policies were instituted immediately afterward.


Of course you know that Giant-Size is a description of the book (68 pages) and not the Man-Thing himself.


Yes, but you do not use Man-Thing as a title character when the book is described as "Giant Size".

Man-Thing by itself is bad enough.
 
2012-11-09 12:47:19 PM

Tax Boy: [i.imgur.com image 700x704]

wow...dude....infinity ... just think about it .... man


Since that was a Ditko book, the wonder that awaited Doc Strange was the world after the Creators and Entrepreneurs had taken over.
 
2012-11-09 01:07:16 PM
Ditko is therefore a good argument against the evils of drugs.
 
2012-11-09 01:19:37 PM

Nurglitch: Ditko is therefore a good argument against the evils of drugs.


No, Ditko wasn't addicted to drugs, his addiction was worse and more destructive... his addiction was to the works of Ayn Rand.
 
2012-11-09 01:22:37 PM
picked up this book after reading the excerpt two weeks ago. Interesting read if you're into comics.
 
2012-11-09 01:25:57 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Nurglitch: Ditko is therefore a good argument against the evils of drugs.

No, Ditko wasn't addicted to drugs, his addiction was worse and more destructive... his addiction was to the works of Ayn Rand.


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-11-09 01:30:22 PM
I'm not a comic maven or a tripster, but this was obvious to me all along.
 
2012-11-09 01:46:26 PM
I have the Star Reach series, and the Starlin story about the guy fighing death in the first issue was pretty cool. I always suspected that it said a lot about Starlin himself, so the discussion in this article is no surprise.

The Cosmic Cube storyline was nothing short of EPIC, along with the Avengers Celestial Madonna run. I had a couple of issues of each in the 70s....and in the 80s when I began collecting seriously, the first thing I did was snap up NM copies of every issue in both runs. The artwork, the characters, the whole shootin' match was top of the line, IMO. Damned trippy stuff...!

In fact, I began to focus on the Avengers, and eventually collected the entire run (including crossovers). I will say that was one massive wonderful labor of love that last several years. And I NEVER get tired of pulling out the boxes and staring at the cover art of the old issues.
 
2012-11-09 02:09:30 PM
I've been meaning to get into old Captain Marvel or Warlock. Most of my 70s collection consisted of Defenders issues I got as a kid out of the 25 cent bin, which were pretty bizarre. Probably my clearest memory is an issue where the Hulk is obsessed with eating beans. I'd hate to be there when he digests that...
 
2012-11-09 02:26:04 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Tax Boy: [i.imgur.com image 700x704]

wow...dude....infinity ... just think about it .... man

Since that was a Ditko book, the wonder that awaited Doc Strange was the world after the Creators and Entrepreneurs had taken over.


"Dr. Strange, you will now be lectured for ten hours by the universe's greatest engineer...Galtitron!""
 
2012-11-09 02:56:18 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Drug Testing policies were instituted immediately afterward.

They were still hitting it hard in '77 

img62.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-09 03:00:22 PM
Reading this article reminded me how much I want to read more of Jim Starlin's stuff. More sh*t for the wishlist.
 
2012-11-09 03:06:31 PM

The Stealth Hippopotamus: FirstNationalBastard: Drug Testing policies were instituted immediately afterward.
They were still hitting it hard in '77 

[img62.imageshack.us image 150x108]


Of course. Jim Shooter came in, proclaimed "FARK, I LOVE COCAINE", and Marvel was back, Baby!
 
2012-11-09 03:27:07 PM

Christian Bale: What's with linking to PAGE 2 of an article?

Seems to happen a lot on Fark. Link to page 1, that's where normals start reading.


Sorry, that was me. The first page was just back-story that wasn't really relevant to the headline, re: the fact that the Marvel staffers were all tripping balls. Plus it was looong.

I figured if anybody was interested to they could go back and read it.

I missed this period of Marvel history growing up, but having read this I'm thinking I'm going to track down these comics and check them out. They sound pretty wild.
 
2012-11-09 03:41:00 PM
When Shooter was the head of Valient Comics in the late 80's, he would write a short paragraph on some of the back covers saying what a "rockin' good time" it was working there.

I'm thinking he had a broken VCR with Wild at Heart stuck on infinite playback at that time....
 
2012-11-09 03:49:44 PM
The Moench and Gulacy run on MOKF was one of, if not the best run of the 70's. Between MOKF, Conan and the large format Curtis books, Marvel had some great shiat going on then. Too bad it all went to shiat in the 80's though.
 
2012-11-09 04:04:21 PM
Dr. Strange was the sole reason I grew a goatee and epic sideburns in my college years. It was farking AWESOME. Sadly, the vast majority of female students did not share my love of arcane-optimized facial hair. I was extremely lucky, however, to find one smoking hot young lady who had developed a crush on Edward Mulhare (the Ghost from "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir") as a young teen. And rather than explain that my fancifully manicured man growth was inspired by a different supernatural entity than the one she was all squishy for, I cheerfully forked over $40 for a wool sea coat and turtleneck at the local Army/Navy store and did my best to speak with a Gloucester accent. Slightly dishonest, I admit, but it was effective.
 
2012-11-09 04:20:06 PM
American comics' adolescence, really. Then they grew up and got jobs.

24.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-11-09 04:36:55 PM
I got into Captain Marvel just before he ditched his green/white military uniform.
Have been a fan boy for the title ever since, even though the later wearers of the uniform were ultimately found lacking.
I'm enjoying the new series with Carol Danvers wearing the uniform, she has the best claim to it and the name as Captain America himself even said, as well as the matching powers. Time will tell if the title will survive, but I hope so.
Marvel should give the new Captain Marvel their full support, she only has the same name as the company after all.
 
2012-11-09 04:41:26 PM

Kurmudgeon: I got into Captain Marvel just before he ditched his green/white military uniform.
Have been a fan boy for the title ever since, even though the later wearers of the uniform were ultimately found lacking.
I'm enjoying the new series with Carol Danvers wearing the uniform, she has the best claim to it and the name as Captain America himself even said, as well as the matching powers. Time will tell if the title will survive, but I hope so.
Marvel should give the new Captain Marvel their full support, she only has the same name as the company after all.


PAD's Captain America was the best of the bunch.

Also, Marvel only created the character and registered the name because, yeah, it was the name of the company and Fawcett had ceased to exist and let the real Captain Marvel slip into Public Domain.

/wish Marvel had worked out a deal to get the character along with the name, so DC wouldn't have gotten the big red cheese and farked him up.
 
2012-11-09 04:42:08 PM
Sorry, make that "let the trademark lapse."

Not PD.
 
2012-11-09 04:45:39 PM

drewogatory: The Moench and Gulacy run on MOKF was one of, if not the best run of the 70's. Between MOKF, Conan and the large format Curtis books, Marvel had some great shiat going on then. Too bad it all went to shiat in the 80's though.


The Avengers: The Court-Martial of Hank Pym
Spider-Man: Venom Returns
Amazing Spider-Man: Kraven's Last Hunt
Silver Surfer: Second Star on The Right
Frank Miller/Chris Claremont: Wolverine
Punisher: Full Circle
Secret Wars
Daredevil: Elektra
X-Men: The Phoenix Must Die
Fantastic Four: Emergency
Captain America: Blood On The Moors
Six From Sirius

...yeah, I really don't know WHAT you're smoking, but the 1980s are considered Marvel's finest decade as a whole.
 
2012-11-09 04:52:01 PM

Jedekai: drewogatory: The Moench and Gulacy run on MOKF was one of, if not the best run of the 70's. Between MOKF, Conan and the large format Curtis books, Marvel had some great shiat going on then. Too bad it all went to shiat in the 80's though.

The Avengers: The Court-Martial of Hank Pym
Spider-Man: Venom Returns
Amazing Spider-Man: Kraven's Last Hunt
Silver Surfer: Second Star on The Right
Frank Miller/Chris Claremont: Wolverine
Punisher: Full Circle
Secret Wars
Daredevil: Elektra
X-Men: The Phoenix Must Die
Fantastic Four: Emergency
Captain America: Blood On The Moors
Six From Sirius

...yeah, I really don't know WHAT you're smoking, but the 1980s are considered Marvel's finest decade as a whole.


Well, he is right that Marvel went to shiat in the late 80s after Shooter got the boot.
 
2012-11-09 05:15:33 PM

Jedekai: drewogatory: The Moench and Gulacy run on MOKF was one of, if not the best run of the 70's. Between MOKF, Conan and the large format Curtis books, Marvel had some great shiat going on then. Too bad it all went to shiat in the 80's though.

The Avengers: The Court-Martial of Hank Pym
Spider-Man: Venom Returns
Amazing Spider-Man: Kraven's Last Hunt
Silver Surfer: Second Star on The Right
Frank Miller/Chris Claremont: Wolverine
Punisher: Full Circle
Secret Wars
Daredevil: Elektra
X-Men: The Phoenix Must Die
Fantastic Four: Emergency
Captain America: Blood On The Moors
Six From Sirius

...yeah, I really don't know WHAT you're smoking, but the 1980s are considered Marvel's finest decade as a whole.


You have GOT to be kidding.
 
2012-11-09 08:12:07 PM
Ahhh, Atlas Comics, I had soooooo many of them.
 
2012-11-09 08:15:15 PM

ghare: Ahhh, Atlas Comics, I had soooooo many of them.


Which Atlas comics?

1950s horror and Sfi-=Fi stuff from the company that eventually became Marvel, or the short lived 1970s Atlas COmics?
 
2012-11-09 08:20:57 PM

FirstNationalBastard: ghare: Ahhh, Atlas Comics, I had soooooo many of them.

Which Atlas comics?

1950s horror and Sfi-=Fi stuff from the company that eventually became Marvel, or the short lived 1970s Atlas COmics?


I think he means the renowned Charlottesville Comic book shop. Clearly he bought up Fantasia's final stock.
 
2012-11-09 08:25:32 PM

Fano: FirstNationalBastard: ghare: Ahhh, Atlas Comics, I had soooooo many of them.

Which Atlas comics?

1950s horror and Sfi-=Fi stuff from the company that eventually became Marvel, or the short lived 1970s Atlas COmics?

I think he means the renowned Charlottesville Comic book shop. Clearly he bought up Fantasia's final stock.


I went there once. Found the one OOP Barry Ween TPB that I needed, and some Spectre issues from the Jim Corrigan run to fill out my collection.

Are they closed now?
 
2012-11-09 08:37:39 PM

FirstNationalBastard: The Stealth Hippopotamus: FirstNationalBastard: Drug Testing policies were instituted immediately afterward.
They were still hitting it hard in '77 

[img62.imageshack.us image 150x108]

Of course. Jim Shooter came in, proclaimed "FARK, I LOVE COCAINE", and Marvel was back, Baby!


I can only assume that Rob Liefeld was an early victim of bath salts.
 
2012-11-09 08:40:06 PM

ghare: Ahhh, Atlas Comics, I had soooooo many of them.


So, all of them?

www.art4comics.com
 
2012-11-09 09:09:09 PM
everything was pretty twisted in the mid-70s...an interesting time to be a small child.
 
2012-11-09 10:46:37 PM
farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2012-11-10 12:21:46 AM
Wowie Maui?
 
2012-11-10 01:54:05 AM

FirstNationalBastard: Nurglitch: Ditko is therefore a good argument against the evils of drugs.

No, Ditko wasn't addicted to drugs, his addiction was worse and more destructive... his addiction was to the works of Ayn Rand.


Now show us on the doll where Ayn Rand touched you.

/At least she didn't write a book that's three volumes with 1,000 plus pages, per volume.
//You know what book I'm talking about and it's not "The Communist Manifesto".
 
2012-11-10 05:34:39 AM

FirstNationalBastard: ghare: Ahhh, Atlas Comics, I had soooooo many of them.

Which Atlas comics?

1950s horror and Sfi-=Fi stuff from the company that eventually became Marvel, or the short lived 1970s Atlas COmics?


the 70's ones, I sold 'em all years ago though.
 
2012-11-10 07:07:06 AM
kirbymuseum.org
 
2012-11-10 07:12:04 AM
media-cache-ec2.pinterest.com
 
2012-11-10 11:58:45 AM
Yeah Englehart,Conway -- that's the period I began drifting away from Marvel. (though I loved Shang-Chi and I bought all the later Starlin stuff) -- wasn't until that incredible Clairmont/Byrne collaboration that Marvel really soared again.

Oh and re: Starlin's psych characters "I just took what had come before" -- yeah, a very specific "before". Starlin's stable is as close to Kirby's New Gods as the Squadron Supreme is to the JLA

Thanos, Darkseid
Mentor, Highfather
Drax, Orion
Eros, Lightray

Yeah Kirby should be getting a credit on Thanos
 
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