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(Yahoo)   Houston cornerback makes history with the first torn inferior vena cava to result from a football hit, makes history again by surviving an injury that kills 95% of the time   (sports.yahoo.com) divider line 33
    More: Scary, cornerback, University of Houston, tearing, Conference USA, internal bleeding, team physician, motor vehicle accidents, trauma team  
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3141 clicks; posted to Sports » on 09 Nov 2012 at 11:12 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-09 11:24:26 AM  
Injury in his leg that tore the inferior vena cava? It's been awhile since I took anatomy, but I think he'd basically have to have the leg pulled off above his head taking a big chunk of torso with it.

In which case, we need to see that hit.
 
2012-11-09 11:26:58 AM  
That's what you get when you go with the cheap stuff. I only buy superior venae cava.
 
2012-11-09 11:27:41 AM  

Occam's Disposable Razor: Injury in his leg that tore the inferior vena cava? It's been awhile since I took anatomy, but I think he'd basically have to have the leg pulled off above his head taking a big chunk of torso with it.

In which case, we need to see that hit.


2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-11-09 11:29:57 AM  

mootmah: That's what you get when you go with the cheap stuff. I only buy superior venae cava.


HA!
 
2012-11-09 11:32:09 AM  
I pray that he recovers from this and hope it doesn't hinder any of his life goals.
 
2012-11-09 11:33:56 AM  
Well this is my new "most gruesome injury" story. Tony Romo playing with a punctured lung was the tops but this is just insane.
 
2012-11-09 11:36:01 AM  
FTA: "This injury has never been seen or reported in association with a football injury and is more associated with high-speed motor vehicle injuries," head team physician Dr. Walter Lowe said in a release.

Jesus Christ! How fast were these guys running?! O_O
 
2012-11-09 11:36:41 AM  
I wonder how quickly they figured out he was bleeding internally?
 
2012-11-09 11:39:02 AM  

SlothB77: I wonder how quickly they figured out he was bleeding internally?


He's still alive, so I'd wager it was pretty quickly.
 
2012-11-09 11:41:59 AM  
i830.photobucket.com

Chatting with the medical professionals (actual ones, I'm not being facetious) in the office, we can't for the life of us figure out how this injury happened. Best theory is that he cracked a rib and the rib poked it, but even then you're going through layers of flesh and membranes before you get there. 

/if by permission you mean photobucket, then yes
 
2012-11-09 11:43:40 AM  

grinding_journalist: Best theory is that he cracked a rib and the rib poked it, but even then you're going through layers of flesh and membranes before you get there.


That would have to have been a tremendous rib injury to penetrate all the way into his leg.
 
2012-11-09 11:44:16 AM  

Captain Steroid: FTA: "This injury has never been seen or reported in association with a football injury and is more associated with high-speed motor vehicle injuries," head team physician Dr. Walter Lowe said in a release.

Jesus Christ! How fast were these guys running?! O_O


Sports Science had an episode where they had Antonio Cromartie hit a dummy at full-speed. He was, to quote, "A 35MPH car accident waiting to happen."
 
2012-11-09 11:45:57 AM  
Just pestered the vascular surgeon; he says that if you got blasted in the back really hard, it's possible to tear, and the severity of the injury isn't because of the torn vena cava, as the vena cava is a "low pressure" vein that will taper off bleeding as soon as the surrounding pressure is equal- the issue is that to suffer such a tear, a number of other things would have to be significantly damaged for it to happen, and the compounding of these effects is what is life threatening.
 
2012-11-09 11:46:53 AM  

Captain Steroid: FTA: "This injury has never been seen or reported in association with a football injury and is more associated with high-speed motor vehicle injuries," head team physician Dr. Walter Lowe said in a release.

Jesus Christ! How fast were these guys running?! O_O


An average cornerback could probably do the 40-yard dash in about 4.5 seconds. That translates to 26.64 feet per second, which translates to about 18 miles per hour. Now if he'shiatting a receiver running at the same speed head-on, that's a 36 mph differential. So think of a car going 36 mph straight into a wall.

Now also consider that if you get into a car accident, there's a crumple zone in front of you. There's space between you and the steering wheel. Maybe there's an airbag. So by the time you actually hit a hard surface, you're already traveling significantly slower than your initial velocity. If you're hit during a football game, the first contact is going to be with your head or your collar bone. There's no room to absorb the impact.

So... yeah. Football hurts.
 
2012-11-09 11:47:44 AM  

grinding_journalist: Chatting with the medical professionals (actual ones, I'm not being facetious) in the office, we can't for the life of us figure out how this injury happened. Best theory is that he cracked a rib and the rib poked it, but even then you're going through layers of flesh and membranes before you get there. 

/if by permission you mean photobucket, then yes


They must have misspoken about either the leg or the vein. If it's truly a leg injury the femoral or iliac veins can still bleed you out in a hurry. If it really did tear the IVC, it's probably like the doctor quoted above mentioned - a high energy collision to the torso.
 
2012-11-09 11:52:14 AM  
Ouch.
 
2012-11-09 11:53:19 AM  

grinding_journalist: Just pestered the vascular surgeon; he says that if you got blasted in the back really hard, it's possible to tear, and the severity of the injury isn't because of the torn vena cava, as the vena cava is a "low pressure" vein that will taper off bleeding as soon as the surrounding pressure is equal- the issue is that to suffer such a tear, a number of other things would have to be significantly damaged for it to happen, and the compounding of these effects is what is life threatening.


So since this is fatal 95% of the time (and I'm sure very quickly), does this mean one of the trainers or paramedics immediately recognized what happened/are there discernible symptoms that he would have been eliciting versus other injuries?

Occam's Disposable Razor: grinding_journalist: Chatting with the medical professionals (actual ones, I'm not being facetious) in the office, we can't for the life of us figure out how this injury happened. Best theory is that he cracked a rib and the rib poked it, but even then you're going through layers of flesh and membranes before you get there.

/if by permission you mean photobucket, then yes

They must have misspoken about either the leg or the vein. If it's truly a leg injury the femoral or iliac veins can still bleed you out in a hurry. If it really did tear the IVC, it's probably like the doctor quoted above mentioned - a high energy collision to the torso.


Searching the story on Google, this seems to be the only article that mentions the leg in it (they all just mention circulation with the lower body). I think the reporter who wrote this particular article didn't realize the inferior vena cava is involved with blood flow of the legs, but is not actually in the leg.
 
2012-11-09 11:53:45 AM  

Occam's Disposable Razor: They must have misspoken about either the leg or the vein.


A journalist? Not knowing technical/medical/professional/engineering/science/space/automotive/lo comotive/electromotive/votive terminology, which results in much confusion for people who DO know?

You're crazy. That never happens.
 
2012-11-09 11:55:55 AM  

Lee's_Austin: Sports Science had an episode where they had Antonio Cromartie hit a dummy at full-speed. He was, to quote, "A 35MPH car accident waiting to happen."


Arkanaut: An average cornerback could probably do the 40-yard dash in about 4.5 seconds. That translates to 26.64 feet per second, which translates to about 18 miles per hour. Now if he'shiatting a receiver running at the same speed head-on, that's a 36 mph differential. So think of a car going 36 mph straight into a wall.

Now also consider that if you get into a car accident, there's a crumple zone in front of you. There's space between you and the steering wheel. Maybe there's an airbag. So by the time you actually hit a hard surface, you're already traveling significantly slower than your initial velocity. If you're hit during a football game, the first contact is going to be with your head or your collar bone. There's no room to absorb the impact.

So... yeah. Football hurts.


Wow. Okay, thanks. That actually helped. :-)
 
2012-11-09 12:05:05 PM  

grinding_journalist: A journalist? Not knowing technical/medical/professional/engineering/science/space/automotive/lo comotive/electromotive/votive terminology, which results in much confusion for people who DO know?

You're crazy. That never happens.


A journalist? Writing for Yahoo?

/He goes by "Dr. Saturday", so you'd think he'd at least have a passing knowledge of medicine.
//Like Dr. Phil.
 
2012-11-09 12:37:29 PM  

Captain Steroid: Lee's_Austin: Sports Science had an episode where they had Antonio Cromartie hit a dummy at full-speed. He was, to quote, "A 35MPH car accident waiting to happen."

Arkanaut: An average cornerback could probably do the 40-yard dash in about 4.5 seconds. That translates to 26.64 feet per second, which translates to about 18 miles per hour. Now if he'shiatting a receiver running at the same speed head-on, that's a 36 mph differential. So think of a car going 36 mph straight into a wall.

Now also consider that if you get into a car accident, there's a crumple zone in front of you. There's space between you and the steering wheel. Maybe there's an airbag. So by the time you actually hit a hard surface, you're already traveling significantly slower than your initial velocity. If you're hit during a football game, the first contact is going to be with your head or your collar bone. There's no room to absorb the impact.

So... yeah. Football hurts.

Wow. Okay, thanks. That actually helped. :-)


Internet High-Five.
 
2012-11-09 01:05:59 PM  
That should be an internet solemn low-five after what just happened.
 
2012-11-09 01:13:34 PM  

Lee's_Austin: Captain Steroid: FTA: "This injury has never been seen or reported in association with a football injury and is more associated with high-speed motor vehicle injuries," head team physician Dr. Walter Lowe said in a release.

Jesus Christ! How fast were these guys running?! O_O

Sports Science had an episode where they had Antonio Cromartie hit a dummy at full-speed. He was, to quote, "A 35MPH car accident waiting to happen."


Cromartie hit something?
 
2012-11-09 01:23:48 PM  

Bongo Blue: Lee's_Austin: Captain Steroid: FTA: "This injury has never been seen or reported in association with a football injury and is more associated with high-speed motor vehicle injuries," head team physician Dr. Walter Lowe said in a release.

Jesus Christ! How fast were these guys running?! O_O

Sports Science had an episode where they had Antonio Cromartie hit a dummy at full-speed. He was, to quote, "A 35MPH car accident waiting to happen."

Cromartie hit something?


They dressed it up like a potential baby-mama.
 
2012-11-09 01:40:40 PM  

Lee's_Austin: Bongo Blue: Lee's_Austin: Captain Steroid: FTA: "This injury has never been seen or reported in association with a football injury and is more associated with high-speed motor vehicle injuries," head team physician Dr. Walter Lowe said in a release.

Jesus Christ! How fast were these guys running?! O_O

Sports Science had an episode where they had Antonio Cromartie hit a dummy at full-speed. He was, to quote, "A 35MPH car accident waiting to happen."

Cromartie hit something?

They dressed it up like a potential baby-mama.


I was gonna go with paid him enough to cover child support, but your theory is quite plausible...
 
2012-11-09 01:59:14 PM  
God speed, young man...hoping you have a successful recovery.
 
2012-11-09 02:30:22 PM  
Had a bio teacher years back who talked about a track meet he was at where a runner went down screaming. When the trainers got to him, they found that both hamstrings had become detached and had rolled up in the back of his thighs. This sounds worse than that.
 
2012-11-09 02:57:04 PM  

feanorn: was at where a runner went down screaming. When the trainers got to him, they found that both hamstrings had become detached and had rolled up in the


Pretty much any arm or leg muscle will ball up like that if it becomes detached, as will the Achilles tendon.

I remember watching a NFL game back in the 90's at Veteran's Stadium (The Vet) in Philly. It was notorious for having the worst playing surface in the NFL (Astro Turf, of course). Lots of seams and holes in the underlying surface and had about as much padding as a towel laid over concrete. Anyway, a player was running uncontested to the end zone for a TD when he falls in a heap on the field. They later said it was a dislocated kneecap that had been relocated in the middle of this thigh. Gross.
 
2012-11-09 03:08:18 PM  

mynamebackwards: feanorn: was at where a runner went down screaming. When the trainers got to him, they found that both hamstrings had become detached and had rolled up in the

Pretty much any arm or leg muscle will ball up like that if it becomes detached, as will the Achilles tendon.

I remember watching a NFL game back in the 90's at Veteran's Stadium (The Vet) in Philly. It was notorious for having the worst playing surface in the NFL (Astro Turf, of course). Lots of seams and holes in the underlying surface and had about as much padding as a towel laid over concrete. Anyway, a player was running uncontested to the end zone for a TD when he falls in a heap on the field. They later said it was a dislocated kneecap that had been relocated in the middle of this thigh. Gross.


Wasn't there a WR who tore both his pattelar tendons at the same time on that turf? I seem to remember hearing both his quads/kneecaps did the same "window-shade" roll-up
 
2012-11-09 04:31:52 PM  
just rub some dirt on it.
 
2012-11-09 06:38:39 PM  
I described this story to my wife (medical field) and her face was farking priceless.

She's all, "And he LIVED?"

"Yup. Critical but stable."

"ANd they diagnosed this on a football field?"

"Yup."

"Holy shiat!"

etc
 
2012-11-10 06:28:24 AM  
I imagine the 95% are not 100ft from medical personnel when they sustain their injury.
 
2012-11-10 11:13:06 AM  
"Arkanaut: An average cornerback could probably do the 40-yard dash in about 4.5 seconds. That translates to 26.64 feet per second, which translates to about 18 miles per hour. Now if he'shiatting a receiver running at the same speed head-on, that's a 36 mph differential. So think of a car going 36 mph straight into a wall."

Hmm doesn't sound right to me. Check newtons 3rd law. Two objects colliding at 18 mph head on will have equivalent damage to hitting a brick wall at 18 mph, not 36 mph. Mythbusters tested that one.
 
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