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(Wired)   If a cop looks up your driver's license record without a good reason you could win a million dollars. Well, you couldn't, but she did   (wired.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting, photos, computer fraud, data breaches, Department of Public Safety, City Pages, private data, databases  
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18663 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Nov 2012 at 5:30 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



113 Comments   (+0 »)
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Archived thread
 
2012-11-06 04:23:09 PM  
OMG Someone looked at my driver's license photo! It's going to take at least $1M for me to get over this emotional trauma!
 
2012-11-06 04:51:50 PM  
Wow, that seems a little excessive.

And by a little i mean a farking lot.
 
2012-11-06 05:34:15 PM  
Gary Busey already has enough money.
 
2012-11-06 05:35:28 PM  
Well, she's cute, but not that cute. Cops really that hard up?
 
2012-11-06 05:36:24 PM  
article is worthless.
 
2012-11-06 05:36:24 PM  
Wasn't there a creepy cop rapist from illinois who did that to stalk victims? And that's really friggin illegal!
 
2012-11-06 05:37:19 PM  
Police officers, please stop breaking the law.
 
2012-11-06 05:38:20 PM  
i.dailymail.co.uk
/Kinda begs for a caption contest.
 
2012-11-06 05:39:28 PM  
while that dollar amount sounds alarmingly high, if you read the article, they were abusing the police database, looking up her picture for non-police related duties.

That shiat -is- frowned upon, and is quite illegal.
 
2012-11-06 05:40:43 PM  
So the issue is she had a B00B job and was a carpenter'd dream in her photo. Did I get that right?
 
2012-11-06 05:41:05 PM  
I just *KNEW* there was something crooked behind the Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes...
 
2012-11-06 05:41:31 PM  

Nexzus: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 306x423]
/Kinda begs for a caption contest.

I guess you think you're... you know, like an authority figure, with that stupid farkin' uniform, huh buddy? King clip-on-tie there, big farkin' man, huh? You know these are the limits of your life, man. The rule of your little farkin' gate here. Here's your four dollars, you pathetic piece of shiat.


/I dunno why, but her smile reminded me of Fargo...
//Quote doesn't even make sense for here
 
2012-11-06 05:41:59 PM  
how iz this illegal??
 
2012-11-06 05:43:21 PM  
If only there were some random services that allowed you to store and share images quasi-anonymously
Maybe then one person could have grabbed it
Giving out a url probably would've been cheaper
Unless they supoena'd said service for image view counts
Really, the amount of money is a tad excessive for someone viewing a DL photo.
... Not like it was porn
Curiosity does make me wonder what the photo looks like, though
Oh well,
Maybe someone will post it on imgur.com
 
2012-11-06 05:44:44 PM  

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: I just *KNEW* there was something crooked behind the Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes...


We have a winner. And welcome back!
 
2012-11-06 05:45:12 PM  

Treygreen13: Gary Busey already has enough money.


This must be her family?

i163.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-06 05:45:14 PM  
Probable cause and all.

It would be like someone in the medical profession going back and pulling all of your old medical records for absolutely no reason.

Unless there's a specific reason for it (curiosity doesnt count), its illegal and an invasion of a person's private information.
 
2012-11-06 05:45:24 PM  
Fta: "Rasmusson... who was known by colleagues as "Bubbles" because of her effusive personality"

Yeah right.
 
2012-11-06 05:45:29 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: how iz this illegal??


It's illegal if there is a law against it and you do it anyway.

Article says why the law is there.

-_-*
 
2012-11-06 05:47:49 PM  
So, they looked up your pic that is on a database that any law enforcement officer or anyone with access could get to..and did noting wrong with it..besides look? And that's a million bucks?

/wow
 
2012-11-06 05:48:23 PM  

Apos: We have a winner.


You're saying... I may already *be* one??? :D


Apos: And welcome back!


*tips hat*

Much obliged, amigo - thanks kindly!
 
2012-11-06 05:51:05 PM  
fta: Rasmusson, a former police officer with the St. Paul Police Department, who was known by colleagues as "Bubbles" because of her effusive personality

Seems like she's back in town and needs your new phone number.
 
2012-11-06 05:51:48 PM  
folks was all "no big deal" when it was Mr Catch 'em, Cook 'em and Eat 'em... why the outrage now?
 
2012-11-06 05:52:10 PM  

i478.photobucket.com




/I think I would be looking her up as well!
 
2012-11-06 05:53:02 PM  

snuff3r: Wow, that seems a little excessive.

And by a little i mean a farking lot.


If you read the article you'd know that the fine for illegally accessing the database of confidential information is only $2500 per infraction which is actually more than reasonable and possibly even a little bit low considering what kinds of abuses this can lead to.

The reason the total fine is so much money is because numerous departments had abused the database hundreds and hundreds of times. Saying it shouldn't be so high is like saying "I already got ticketed for going 120MPH in a 45, you can't ticket me again for doing that!"
 
2012-11-06 05:53:15 PM  

Rreal: while that dollar amount sounds alarmingly high, if you read the article, they were abusing the police database, looking up her picture for non-police related duties.

That shiat -is- frowned upon, and is quite illegal.


It gets worse, too... According to one of the articles linked in this one:
Rasmusson also began receiving unsolicited dating offers from cops. An officer she'd met briefly years before texted her asking if she'd like to go boating. Confused by such a forward invitation from someone she could barely remember, she texted back, "I think you have the wrong Anne."

Moments later, the reply arrived: "I've definitely got the right Anne."

She politely declined.

Before long, she stopped seeing a man she'd been out with a couple of times. He didn't take it well, and continued calling, even cruising by her house. In a series of texts, the man said his friend, another police officer, had "filled him in" on her past, her dating life, and even the kind of car she was driving.

She told him never to contact her again.


This isn't just "hurr durr she's hot" but "let's all harass and stalk her," particularly because some of the surrounding context - she was a cop and had left the force after an injury, she was married to another cop and they divorced shortly before this all started, etc.
 
2012-11-06 05:53:17 PM  
OMG

I didn't even know about my drivers license record..

How about that criminal record???

/csb

Love it or leave it ROFLMAO
 
2012-11-06 05:54:14 PM  

Nexzus: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 306x423]
/Kinda begs for a caption contest.


s14.postimage.org

 
2012-11-06 05:54:18 PM  
i.dailymail.co.uk

She does have that 'special' slant about her eyes.

But she's a cop, so I sure she fits right in.
 
2012-11-06 05:55:45 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: fta: Rasmusson, a former police officer with the St. Paul Police Department, who was known by colleagues as "Bubbles" because of her effusive personality

Seems like she's back in town and needs your new phone number.


No thanks.

I have an Army Ranger for now and forever.

The cops.....

I have nothing more to say. I'm taking the 5th.
 
2012-11-06 05:56:02 PM  
Well, you have to admit, that's quite a makeover:

4.bp.blogspot.com

One officer told investigators that he'd been out on patrol one day when his supervisor called his cellphone to tell him he should check out Rasmusson's record. When investigators asked why he was told this, the officer replied, "to look at her picture, um, and this had something, I believe the conversation surrounded plastic surgery that she had done."
 
2012-11-06 05:56:29 PM  
i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2012-11-06 05:57:17 PM  

Nexzus: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 306x423]
/Kinda begs for a caption contest.


Buttsecks?
 
2012-11-06 05:57:36 PM  
meanwhile all you Farkettes and all our ex-girlfriends, ex-wives, GF's, wives, moms, sisters, aunts, nieces and every other female who has been trolled by men in police uniforms that pulled them over just to try and hit on them - you get nothing.
 
2012-11-06 05:57:39 PM  

The more you eat the more you fart: Probable cause and all.

It would be like someone in the medical profession going back and pulling all of your old medical records for absolutely no reason.

Unless there's a specific reason for it (curiosity doesnt count), its illegal and an invasion of a person's private information.


They did that too....

Wonder how many billions that is worth?
 
2012-11-06 05:57:55 PM  

Silly Jesus: OMG Someone looked at my driver's license photo! It's going to take at least $1M for me to get over this emotional trauma!


Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.
 
2012-11-06 05:58:12 PM  
Isn't this like 6 mos old?
 
2012-11-06 05:58:23 PM  

Mr. Carpenter: The reason the total fine is so much money is because numerous departments had abused the database hundreds and hundreds of times. Saying it shouldn't be so high is like saying "I already got ticketed for going 120MPH in a 45, you can't ticket me again for doing that!"


Yeah. FTA: "Further investigation revealed that 104 officers in 18 different agencies across the state had accessed her driver's license record 425 times..."

When it's gone that far, you may as well resort to decimation.
 
2012-11-06 05:58:48 PM  

cookiefleck: Wasn't there a creepy cop rapist from illinois who did that to stalk victims? And that's really friggin illegal!


He was from Chicago.

I think he was in the Senate or something.

Don't quote me on that though.
 
2012-11-06 05:58:53 PM  

vicioushobbit: Jon iz teh kewl: how iz this illegal??

It's illegal if there is a law against it and you do it anyway.

Article says why the law is there.

-_-*


don't u mean "sez"?? instead of says
 
2012-11-06 05:59:30 PM  

WordyGrrl: Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.


I expect this premise to crack the top 10 of the country music charts somehow...
 
2012-11-06 05:59:33 PM  

freewill: Mr. Carpenter: The reason the total fine is so much money is because numerous departments had abused the database hundreds and hundreds of times. Saying it shouldn't be so high is like saying "I already got ticketed for going 120MPH in a 45, you can't ticket me again for doing that!"

Yeah. FTA: "Further investigation revealed that 104 officers in 18 different agencies across the state had accessed her driver's license record 425 times..."

When it's gone that far, you may as well resort to decimation.


According to the other article, the statute requires fines of $2500 per instance of access, so that's $1M right there.
 
2012-11-06 05:59:50 PM  
img198.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-06 05:59:57 PM  

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: Apos: We have a winner.

You're saying... I may already *be* one??? :D


Apos: And welcome back!

*tips hat*

Much obliged, amigo - thanks kindly!


Don't mention it. :)
 
2012-11-06 06:00:43 PM  

WordyGrrl: Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.


Yup. An unusually attractive acquaintance of mine was the subject of a New York Times article on the struggles of Manhattan renters. For some reason, they thought it was appropriate to publish her photo, the address of her building, and the floor she was living on.

She was creeped out about it for months.
 
2012-11-06 06:03:12 PM  

Another Government Employee: Nexzus: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 306x423]
/Kinda begs for a caption contest.

Buttsecks?


Clenis!
 
2012-11-06 06:03:52 PM  
What a bunch of farking d-bags, these frat boy biatches probably had a running pool to see who could nail her. These cops can't even be trusted to respect the privacy their own how the hell can they be trusted to protect a citizen. Every one these guys should at the very least be held personally responsible for the financial hit the state will take on behalf of their action

No I'm not "white knighting" her, I just look for any excuse to remind people that most cops are nothing more than a gang with cool cars and weapons, the only difference being the spiffy matching uniforms.
 
2012-11-06 06:05:07 PM  

freewill: WordyGrrl: Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.

Yup. An unusually attractive acquaintance of mine was the subject of a New York Times article on the struggles of Manhattan renters. For some reason, they thought it was appropriate to publish her photo, the address of her building, and the floor she was living on.

She was creeped out about it for months.


Exactly. There is nothing like being stalked by cops, firefighters, military, politicians.

It will give you nightmares for years.

Unless you are bunked safely every night.

Thankfully, I am.
 
2012-11-06 06:05:13 PM  
I think it would only be fair if they published those cops' names, photos, phone numbers, and home addresses.

/"But you can't do that! It's dangerous! They'll be targeted!"
"Exactly."
 
2012-11-06 06:05:28 PM  

freewill: WordyGrrl: Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.

Yup. An unusually attractive acquaintance of mine was the subject of a New York Times article on the struggles of Manhattan renters. For some reason, they thought it was appropriate to publish her photo, the address of her building, and the floor she was living on.

She was creeped out about it for months.


So where's the link to the story?

/Did I get the wrong message away from your post?
 
2012-11-06 06:06:23 PM  

Theaetetus: I think it would only be fair if they published those cops' names, photos, phone numbers, and home addresses.

/"But you can't do that! It's dangerous! They'll be targeted!"
"Exactly."


An eye for an eye prevents the whole world from seeing things that would only just piss everyone off further anyway.
 
2012-11-06 06:07:48 PM  
dtdstudios.com
 
2012-11-06 06:08:02 PM  
Now they just have to Google the Wired article.
 
2012-11-06 06:10:28 PM  

Theaetetus: I think it would only be fair if they published those cops' names, photos, phone numbers, and home addresses.

/"But you can't do that! It's dangerous! They'll be targeted!"
"Exactly."


I'm cool with this.

Karma is only a biatch if you are and all that.

/lap seat

Anyone want some caramel popcorn balls tonight?
 
2012-11-06 06:10:35 PM  
My ex's cousin in law did this sort of shiat to me and her other friends.
 
2012-11-06 06:11:16 PM  
A cute cop with fake titties, AND a smoking body?

That's worth a $20 and a feel-up.
 
2012-11-06 06:12:19 PM  
I liked the part where all the basically all of the cops skated over it. Apparently abusing the police DB is just a perk of being a cop, and covering the fines a service the city taxpayers provide.

Hopefully whoever's running against those mayors will be able to bring this up.
 
2012-11-06 06:14:21 PM  
That's great that the actions of this jerk cop will cost $1 million... for the taxpayers.

Your Democrat/Lawyer complex at work, folks. Move along, nothing to see here. Justice has been served!!
 
2012-11-06 06:15:24 PM  

SnyderCat: freewill: WordyGrrl: Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.

Yup. An unusually attractive acquaintance of mine was the subject of a New York Times article on the struggles of Manhattan renters. For some reason, they thought it was appropriate to publish her photo, the address of her building, and the floor she was living on.

She was creeped out about it for months.

Exactly. There is nothing like being stalked by cops, firefighters, military, politicians.

It will give you nightmares for years.

Unless you are bunked safely every night.

Thankfully, I am.


I went to great lengths to get lost because of an ex-husband with the 'iffen I cain't have you, ain't nobody gonna have you' mentality. This woman, knowing just how much info the cops have access to, was probably going out of her mind with fear.
 
2012-11-06 06:18:24 PM  

Pantubo: That's great that the actions of this jerk cop will cost $1 million... for the taxpayers.

Your Democrat/Lawyer complex at work, folks. Move along, nothing to see here. Justice has been served!!


First the cops are being creeps using her police files, now you're doing it with her voting records? Wow, you're an jerk.
 
2012-11-06 06:18:27 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com

I don't think i could do it. Every time i see her arms i think of this:

i212.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-06 06:19:05 PM  

Pantubo: That's great that the actions of this dozens of jerk cops in multiple offices will cost $1 million... for the taxpayers.


FTFY. And yes, it's great that the taxpayers in all of those jurisdictions get to hear about this on a day when they to go vote whether to keep their local Sheriff, District Attorney, etc. Don't like paying out the fees for this negligent supervision? Then clean your house.
 
2012-11-06 06:29:05 PM  
Reading the Wired comments makes them all look confused because the commenters missed the point. The fine is not excessive. One violation is only a couple of thousand dollars, but the cops committed over 400 violations of the law. The only reason the fine wasn't higher is because one or two cities settled out of court for lower amounts.

Yet the only thing that happened to the cops who broke the law is a couple of slaps on the wrists for a few of them. So the moral of the story is if you don't want to see huge fines paid out, then you shouldn't violate the law. I can't believe how many people on Wired make the cops out to be the victims and the lady a money grubber.
 
2012-11-06 06:29:08 PM  

Pantubo: That's great that the actions of this 104 jerk cops will cost $1 million... for the taxpayers.


Any of these jerks could have saved taxpayers $2,500 by thinking to themselves, at the moment their laughing jerk colleague suggested they pull up the record, "no, that's wrong, I am not going to do that and am instead going to be a grown man and a professional".

Any of them could have saved taxpayers even more by following that up with "I think I'd better report this to someone who can do something about it right away". This is all squarely the fault of those involved.

cherryl taggart: This woman, knowing just how much info the cops have access to, was probably going out of her mind with fear.


There's obviously a lot more going on in this story, but she apparently actually moved out of town, bought a rural property, changed her phone number, and asked her family not to share her new address.
 
2012-11-06 06:31:48 PM  

Mr. Carpenter: snuff3r: Wow, that seems a little excessive.

And by a little i mean a farking lot.

If you read the article you'd know that the fine for illegally accessing the database of confidential information is only $2500 per infraction



Followed by "accessed her driver's license record more than 400 times".
 
2012-11-06 06:33:39 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: how iz this illegal??


Probably for the sole reason that she is a cop. She's a cop, her information is protected. Your information? Your information is sold.

It's not that they're superior to us. It's just that we're inferior to them.
 
2012-11-06 06:34:26 PM  
I never believe anything from Rassmusson (checks article) Never mind.
 
2012-11-06 06:39:10 PM  

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener


I just *KNEW* there was something crooked behind the Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes...


As I live and breathe, it's TMLO! Welcome back. :-)
 
2012-11-06 06:41:27 PM  
FTFA: An officer who looked at Rasmusson's record 13 times was subsequently demoted and received a five-day suspension, the harshest penalty anyone has received so far. Others have had warning letters placed in their files or were sent for training.

Training? Welcome to "Not Looking Up People's Driver License Photos On A Whim 101". Ok, now, just sit in this room for an hour and don't look at anyone's driver's license picture, ok? Good.
 
2012-11-06 06:43:25 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: As I live and breathe, it's TMLO!


If it means anything, I read that in the rowdiest Jim Ross voice possible.

"THROUGH HELLFIRE AND BRIMSTONE, THAT'S TMLO!"


Englebert Slaptyback: Welcome back. :-)


Thanks a mil, amigo, good to be back and the like :)


ArcadianRefugee: Mr. Carpenter: snuff3r: Wow, that seems a little excessive.

And by a little i mean a farking lot.

If you read the article you'd know that the fine for illegally accessing the database of confidential information is only $2500 per infraction


Followed by "accessed her driver's license record more than 400 times".


By my math, that would be 100 bazillionty dollars.

Feel free to double-check all that.
 
2012-11-06 06:43:51 PM  

Silly Jesus: OMG Someone looked at my driver's license photo! It's going to take at least $1M for me to get over this emotional trauma!


It's not to reward her, it's to punish the police. They've been abusing their authority for YEARS. They should all be in jail.

/all of those cops are creepy as hell
 
2012-11-06 06:43:57 PM  
Lessons learned to be taught in training:

[ ] Do not look up peoples information without probable cause.

[ ] Do not look up peoples information without probable cause, if they are in a position to find out.
 
2012-11-06 06:45:47 PM  

Treygreen13: Gary Busey already has enough money.

 

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-11-06 06:48:27 PM  

stonicus: It's not to reward her, it's to punish the police. They've been abusing their authority for YEARS. They should all be in jail.

/all of those cops are creepy as hell


As other articles point out, cops do this every day, all the time, just for kicks. It's usually relatively harmless, seeing what happened to people you went to high school with, making sure your brother's ex-wife isn't bringing a convicted felon around your niece, etc. Still illegal, but nothing comes of it.

What happened here was apparently a perfect shiatstorm of cops all over the state the state doing that "harmless" lookup, and a few of them being creepy about it. Basically, the poor woman went viral.
 
2012-11-06 06:49:36 PM  
Once I was looking for a guy's information in the database and used a particular feature where the results come back alphabetically for everyone in the state and in the results were the address and vehicle license plates of a certain football player. After I finished what I was working on we gathered around and gawked at the screen. Curiosity was killing as to what his picture looked like but we never ran his specific information.

Supposedly celebrities are flagged in the system. If it gets investigated there better be reason for their information to be run. Allegedly the plates in vehicles in the movies are also under a flag. I've never tried to prove them wrong- I like my job.

It's not a secret there's heavy penalties for violating the rules even for everyday joes.
 
2012-11-06 06:51:06 PM  
She deserved the money. They abused their access to violate her privacy time and again. Cases like hers are the only thing giving average people privacy at all.
 
2012-11-06 06:51:36 PM  

IRQ12: [ ] Do not look up peoples information without probable cause, if they are in a position to find out.


Smart people know this, but remember, these are cops.
 
2012-11-06 06:51:50 PM  

freewill: stonicus: It's not to reward her, it's to punish the police. They've been abusing their authority for YEARS. They should all be in jail.

/all of those cops are creepy as hell

As other articles point out, cops do this every day, all the time, just for kicks. It's usually relatively harmless, seeing what happened to people you went to high school with, making sure your brother's ex-wife isn't bringing a convicted felon around your niece, etc. Still illegal, but nothing comes of it.

What happened here was apparently a perfect shiatstorm of cops all over the state the state doing that "harmless" lookup, and a few of them being creepy about it. Basically, the poor woman went viral.


Apparently so. It's still illegal. They don't have carte blance to just scour people's records on a whim.
 
2012-11-06 06:53:13 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: Mr. Carpenter: snuff3r: Wow, that seems a little excessive.

And by a little i mean a farking lot.

If you read the article you'd know that the fine for illegally accessing the database of confidential information is only $2500 per infraction


Followed by "accessed her driver's license record more than 400 times".


Which is why I went on to say that multiple agencies committed hundreds of infractions. If this had just been a once off affair the punishment would have been light, but what this shows is systematic and institutional disregard for the laws regarding individual privacy and confidential information.

Honestly, in addition to these fines instead of some BS training protocal each officer should be demoted, have their pay docked and/or fired depending on how many times they accessed the info and used it.
 
2012-11-06 06:57:46 PM  

stonicus: Apparently so. It's still illegal. They don't have carte blance to just scour people's records on a whim.


Total agreement. I just think there's a line between "immature and unprofessional" and "creepy".

"Immature and unprofessional" is looking up a picture of a chubby girl and laughing at her with your friends.

"Creepy" is tracking her down and telling her you did it. A couple of those cops should not be employed anymore.
 
2012-11-06 07:01:41 PM  

911Jenny: Allegedly the plates in vehicles in the movies are also under a flag


??
 
2012-11-06 07:04:08 PM  

jaytkay: 911Jenny: Allegedly the plates in vehicles in the movies are also under a flag

??


Example: actor driving a car, the camera pans out and you get a glimpse of the plate.

Supposedly if you run it you can get in trouble.

I never noticed those cars had plates til I was told not to run them.
 
2012-11-06 07:05:54 PM  

911Jenny: Once I was looking for a guy's information in the database and used a particular feature where the results come back alphabetically for everyone in the state and in the results were the address and vehicle license plates of a certain football player. After I finished what I was working on we gathered around and gawked at the screen. Curiosity was killing as to what his picture looked like but we never ran his specific information.

Supposedly celebrities are flagged in the system. If it gets investigated there better be reason for their information to be run. Allegedly the plates in vehicles in the movies are also under a flag. I've never tried to prove them wrong- I like my job.

It's not a secret there's heavy penalties for violating the rules even for everyday joes.


I once prank called Richard Nixon on accident.
 
2012-11-06 07:18:32 PM  
What is it with the weightlifter women that they all have the nastiest set of fake tits money can buy?
 
2012-11-06 07:28:12 PM  
This probably has nothing to do with public sector unions.
 
2012-11-06 07:57:37 PM  

cherryl taggart: SnyderCat: freewill: WordyGrrl: Yes, I've seen your license photo and have decided that you are my soulmate. Now that I also have your home address, I'll be dropping by tonight to inform you that if I can't have you, no one will.

Yup. An unusually attractive acquaintance of mine was the subject of a New York Times article on the struggles of Manhattan renters. For some reason, they thought it was appropriate to publish her photo, the address of her building, and the floor she was living on.

She was creeped out about it for months.

Exactly. There is nothing like being stalked by cops, firefighters, military, politicians.

It will give you nightmares for years.

Unless you are bunked safely every night.

Thankfully, I am.

I went to great lengths to get lost because of an ex-husband with the 'iffen I cain't have you, ain't nobody gonna have you' mentality. This woman, knowing just how much info the cops have access to, was probably going out of her mind with fear.


I am fearless.

My "predators" should be afraid...

Be very afraid.

Most people don't like me when I'm this angry.
 
2012-11-06 08:19:29 PM  
This lady deserves that million dollars and more. It wasn't just a couple of guys in the office and some juvenile snickering. Officers from all over the place accessed a tonne of sensitive information that would be an ID thief or stalker's wet dream to have, then harassed her. She's got to ditch her career, move far away and go into hiding, probably invest in a big dog and several guns (I know I would). Even then a vengeful enough cop could still try to track her down and do something to her.

The amount of derp on the comments in Wired woudn't be out of place on YouTube. Wired explicitly links to the Federal Law they violated hundreds of times and spells out the fine, and they're all still 'how dare that money grubbing whore not know her place and take taxpayer's money'.
 
2012-11-06 08:24:37 PM  
Having had my former downstairs neighbor stalked and attacked, I'm not getting a kick out of this.

/she had to have a plastic surgeon repair her jaw - he almost sliced her neck but
luckily our other downstairs neighbor saved her life by coming out of his apt in time
 
2012-11-06 09:01:31 PM  
Can anyone explain to me why these cops shouldn't be offered a choice between 500 hours of community service plus paying their portion of the settlement (fine and court/lawyer fees) or resigning without pension and benefits? They should be held to higher standards than everyone else.
 
2012-11-06 09:33:38 PM  

911Jenny: Once I was looking for a guy's information in the database and used a particular feature where the results come back alphabetically for everyone in the state and in the results were the address and vehicle license plates of a certain football player. After I finished what I was working on we gathered around and gawked at the screen. Curiosity was killing as to what his picture looked like but we never ran his specific information.

Supposedly celebrities are flagged in the system. If it gets investigated there better be reason for their information to be run. Allegedly the plates in vehicles in the movies are also under a flag. I've never tried to prove them wrong- I like my job.


It's not a secret there's heavy penalties for violating the rules even for everyday joes.

 

My brother works for our sheriffs department & has told me similar stories. He said if they run a plate number, they better have a legit reason. Same with looking up background info on a person. He even told me not to send him any emails that are remotely questionable. Our local newspaper or TV station can invoke the Sunshine Law* and request his private emails with out a search warrant because it is considered public information. 
* Sunshine Law Link
 
2012-11-06 10:03:09 PM  

LiberalEastCoastElitist: Can anyone explain to me why these cops shouldn't be offered a choice between 500 hours of community service plus paying their portion of the settlement (fine and court/lawyer fees) or resigning without pension and benefits? They should be held to higher standards than everyone else.


Personally, I would like to castrate them all.

With a rusty machete.

And treat them to a run through USAMRIID just for the fark of it.

But that's just me.
 
2012-11-06 10:06:00 PM  

911Jenny: Supposedly celebrities are flagged in the system. If it gets investigated there better be reason for their information to be run.


I used to work large balance accounts for a very well known credit company. I was one of two people authorized to work accounts over a certain size. However other accounts would also be flagged 'large balance' simply based on the name attached to the account. Celebrities, politicians, sports figures or anyone else that could be a target of a curious employee got flagged into our domain.

Back story revolved around a problem with a well known celebrity. A class of trainees all decided to look and see if she had an account - she did. They then decided to pull her credit report just to look and see what she had (she's one of the worlds richest woman). Her accountants and lawyers got wind of it and demanded that every single employee be fired and that her account be zeroed out. She got what she wanted and the result was that any account that could somehow be 'attractive' was added the 'large balance' domain.

If any employee other myself or the other guy looked at an account with the large balance flag (beyond the splash screen which had almost no info other than it was large balance) two things would happen. The employee would discover that they couldn't read the account, the second was that a report would be generated and the employee would be fired as soon as possible.

Within a few months the model we used got replicated out to a /lot/ of other credit companies. I would imagine that this would have been just as easy to replicate out to something like drivers license databases as well.
 
2012-11-06 10:08:13 PM  

Dwangerous: What a bunch of farking d-bags, these frat boy biatches probably had a running pool to see who could nail her. These cops can't even be trusted to respect the privacy their own how the hell can they be trusted to protect a citizen. Every one these guys should at the very least be held personally responsible for the financial hit the state will take on behalf of their action

No I'm not "white knighting" her, I just look for any excuse to remind people that most cops are nothing more than a gang with cool cars and weapons, the only difference being the spiffy matching uniforms.


but you're right. the dicks who did the deeds should be paying the fine. somehow i get the feeling the money will be coming from tax payers who did nothing to deserve the screwing they are getting. proving once again, if you can get over that whole "wow am I a dickhead" thing, it's great to be a cop.
 
2012-11-06 10:39:31 PM  

onyxruby: 911Jenny: Supposedly celebrities are flagged in the system. If it gets investigated there better be reason for their information to be run.

I used to work large balance accounts for a very well known credit company. I was one of two people authorized to work accounts over a certain size. However other accounts would also be flagged 'large balance' simply based on the name attached to the account. Celebrities, politicians, sports figures or anyone else that could be a target of a curious employee got flagged into our domain.

Back story revolved around a problem with a well known celebrity. A class of trainees all decided to look and see if she had an account - she did. They then decided to pull her credit report just to look and see what she had (she's one of the worlds richest woman). Her accountants and lawyers got wind of it and demanded that every single employee be fired and that her account be zeroed out. She got what she wanted and the result was that any account that could somehow be 'attractive' was added the 'large balance' domain.

If any employee other myself or the other guy looked at an account with the large balance flag (beyond the splash screen which had almost no info other than it was large balance) two things would happen. The employee would discover that they couldn't read the account, the second was that a report would be generated and the employee would be fired as soon as possible.

Within a few months the model we used got replicated out to a /lot/ of other credit companies. I would imagine that this would have been just as easy to replicate out to something like drivers license databases as well.


you can probably neither confirm or deny, but was it Oprah? it sounds like Oprah.
 
2012-11-06 10:49:13 PM  

SnyderCat: cookiefleck: Wasn't there a creepy cop rapist from illinois who did that to stalk victims? And that's really friggin illegal!

He was from Chicago.

I think he was in the Senate or something.

Don't quote me on that though.


You're probably thinking of Sgt. Jeff Pelo, who was from downstate and not a Senator.

He would run plates to get home addresses, then show up and rape women he found attractive.

Was caught in the middle of the night outside his next victim's house with a "rape kit" and avoided arrest by telling his colleague that he was house shopping. However, someone put 2+2 together and he was eventually charged and convicted.

Sergeant Pelo recently had his sentenced reduced from 440 to 375 years, so he probably won't get his job back soon.
 
2012-11-06 10:50:49 PM  
This dumb cow again?

Gee, it must be nice to "retire" on taxpayer paid disability, because your back hurts too much to do your job.

Oh, lifting weights top get in shape for competition? No one asks about that.
 
2012-11-06 10:58:14 PM  

Dwangerous: What a bunch of farking d-bags, these frat boy biatches probably had a running pool to see who could nail her. These cops can't even be trusted to respect the privacy their own how the hell can they be trusted to protect a citizen. Every one these guys should at the very least be held personally responsible for the financial hit the state will take on behalf of their action

No I'm not "white knighting" her, I just look for any excuse to remind people that most cops are nothing more than a gang with cool cars and weapons, the only difference being the spiffy matching uniforms.


What? Crips and Bloods don't have "spiffy matching uniforms"?

I kind of like the summer service skirts they wear.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-11-06 11:04:45 PM  
He said if they run a plate number, they better have a legit reason.

Around here running plates is what cops do when they are bored. Normal people can't find out who's been looking up their info. If a cop asks for your record he gets told there was an inquiry about you last week from (department) and you beat a speeding ticket last summer. So he knows you did something wrong last week and got away with it and you're a habitual speeder and got away with it, so he'd better write you a ticket now. If you ask for your record you get your convictions only.  It would be nice if every inquiry came with a real reason attached and the civilian could find out who is being nosy. The system is designed to work the opposite way.
 
2012-11-07 12:11:28 AM  

Mad Mark: My brother works for our sheriffs department & has told me similar stories. He said if they run a plate number, they better have a legit reason. Same with looking up background info on a person. He even told me not to send him any emails that are remotely questionable. Our local newspaper or TV station can invoke the Sunshine Law* and request his private emails with out a search warrant because it is considered public information.
* Sunshine Law Link


Private emails as in something like gmail or private as in going to his work address? At my work address there is no such thing as private. They spell it out loud and clear.
 
2012-11-07 12:25:45 AM  

fnordfocus: SnyderCat: cookiefleck: Wasn't there a creepy cop rapist from illinois who did that to stalk victims? And that's really friggin illegal!

He was from Chicago.

I think he was in the Senate or something.

Don't quote me on that though.

You're probably thinking of Sgt. Jeff Pelo, who was from downstate and not a Senator.

He would run plates to get home addresses, then show up and rape women he found attractive.

Was caught in the middle of the night outside his next victim's house with a "rape kit" and avoided arrest by telling his colleague that he was house shopping. However, someone put 2+2 together and he was eventually charged and convicted.

Sergeant Pelo recently had his sentenced reduced from 440 to 375 years, so he probably won't get his job back soon.


I'm extremely happy to hear that.
 
2012-11-07 12:26:25 AM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voaGM4CMQ9c

Anyone else leaving the country?
 
2012-11-07 12:59:51 AM  
With all her pics in this thread. How much is FARK going to have to put up?
 
2012-11-07 06:21:54 AM  

stuffy: With all her pics in this thread. How much is FARK going to have to put up?


Thanks to all the Maker's Mark, FARK couldn't get it up if it tried.
 
2012-11-07 07:22:44 AM  

titwrench: I once prank called Richard Nixon on accident.


Was it, "I'm scared, Mr President. I'm scared of the Space Man"?
 
2012-11-07 07:23:31 AM  
So what harm was caused to require those damages? Oh... it's codified in 18 USC § 2724. Damn. You lawyers get us coming & going. I don't know how you summarize the actions of the state, and then separately count the separate actions of individuals as "226 look-ups".
 
2012-11-07 09:11:06 AM  

KrispyKritter: Dwangerous: What a bunch of farking d-bags, these frat boy biatches probably had a running pool to see who could nail her. These cops can't even be trusted to respect the privacy their own how the hell can they be trusted to protect a citizen. Every one these guys should at the very least be held personally responsible for the financial hit the state will take on behalf of their action

No I'm not "white knighting" her, I just look for any excuse to remind people that most cops are nothing more than a gang with cool cars and weapons, the only difference being the spiffy matching uniforms.

but you're right. the dicks who did the deeds should be paying the fine. somehow i get the feeling the money will be coming from tax payers who did nothing to deserve the screwing they are getting. proving once again, if you can get over that whole "wow am I a dickhead" thing, it's great to be a cop.

the dicks who did the deeds should be paying the fine. somehow i get the feeling the money will be coming from tax payers who did nothing to deserve the screwing they are getting.

 

This is SO true. Let the stupid farks that did the deed pay the fine...
 
2012-11-07 09:22:10 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Isn't this like 6 mos old?



No. She may be a babe, but I'd put her around 40.
 
2012-11-07 09:45:26 AM  

Rreal: while that dollar amount sounds alarmingly high, if you read the article, they were abusing the police database, looking up her picture for non-police related duties.

That shiat -is- frowned upon, and is quite illegal.


Would it make more sense to fire the people responsible?

(Instead of ripping off the taxpayer. Again. Which doesn't hurt anybody involved in the crime...)
 
2012-11-07 10:10:19 AM  

Cold_Sassy: KrispyKritter: Dwangerous: What a bunch of farking d-bags, these frat boy biatches probably had a running pool to see who could nail her. These cops can't even be trusted to respect the privacy their own how the hell can they be trusted to protect a citizen. Every one these guys should at the very least be held personally responsible for the financial hit the state will take on behalf of their action

No I'm not "white knighting" her, I just look for any excuse to remind people that most cops are nothing more than a gang with cool cars and weapons, the only difference being the spiffy matching uniforms.

but you're right. the dicks who did the deeds should be paying the fine. somehow i get the feeling the money will be coming from tax payers who did nothing to deserve the screwing they are getting. proving once again, if you can get over that whole "wow am I a dickhead" thing, it's great to be a cop.

the dicks who did the deeds should be paying the fine. somehow i get the feeling the money will be coming from tax payers who did nothing to deserve the screwing they are getting. 

This is SO true. Let the stupid farks that did the deed pay the fine...


Scapegoats then?
 
2012-11-07 10:22:01 AM  

snuff3r: Wow, that seems a little excessive.

And by a little i mean a farking lot.


Apparently it's not high enough.

FTFA:
Discipline for the perpetrators has been light in most cases or non-existent.

If nobody's learned anything from it and business goes on as usual, there need to be punitive payments too.
 
2012-11-07 08:12:09 PM  
Wait until the system being abused by a horny LEO is not a drivers license database but an app that gives access to aerial surveillance photos from satellites and drones. That kind of scenario could spark some public outrage. Come on, you NSA whistle blowers!

//hang on, someone at the door
 
2012-11-07 10:20:52 PM  
headline: If a cop looks up your driver's license record without a good reason you could win a million dollars. Well, you couldn't, but she did

Pronoun fail...makes it sound as if a) a female cop got a 1m reward for looking at a civilian's DMV record and b) submitter thought that the civilian should have gotten the reward instead.

Also, she went through a lot more than just having her photo looked at.
 
2012-11-07 10:25:16 PM  
* "should have gotten the reward instead" = "should have gotten that money as compensation instead."
 
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