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(Macworld UK)   Apple tells guy that even though the dirt cheap prices on his order were in error, they'll honor them on items already shipped. They then turn around hand have the packages intercepted in transit   (macworld.co.uk) divider line 152
    More: Fail, apples, customer support, Adam Crouchley  
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8128 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Nov 2012 at 7:18 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-07 04:59:14 PM  

Marine1: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: Flint Ironstag: tbhouston: Umm.."honour".. farking proof read your article

That is the correct spelling. It's only you Americans who spell it wrong.

Interesting point of fact: "honour" is the incorrect spelling and American English has it right. The extra "u" is a carry-over artifact from French influences of all things and a fairly recent change (came in a couple centuries or few after the rest of Modern English basics stabilized) in the history of the language.

Really! If you have an Oxford dictionary (the real one), look it up. "Honor" was spelled "honor" originally and only about Shakespeare's time did the "u" just start creeping in, but even he preferred the "u"-less version for the bulk of his work. When Webster compiled his dictionary, he didn't change the spelling of the word, but rather went with "honor" as it was "the best spelling" (his words), the variant educated speakers used.

I tend to find it amusing as hell when someone goes off about "incorrect" American English. Odds tend to be that the traits being railed against are the way real English is spoken and the Brits are the ones who have gone off on a weird new path. Even the past two hundred years have seen some significant changes in British English that Americans have stayed true through, which is why we lack superfluous "u"s and still have our rhoticity. (There's a reason researchers from there fly over here to learn how British English was spoken in the past; want to hear Shakespearean English, the only place to find it is to go to islands off of Virginia, for instance.) The old guard of the educated used to bemoan how much English was "decaying" in the UK while it remained whole here, but now a strange inversion has occurred where folks are so used to the changes they think Americans are the one's who've lost how to use English in opposition to the truth. Current British English is a strange beast, so different than it used to be that artificially constructed accents ...


you guys remember when fark was an american site?

i for one welcome our new british-canadian overlords
 
2012-11-07 05:08:07 PM  

Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: Flint Ironstag: tbhouston: Umm.."honour".. farking proof read your article

That is the correct spelling. It's only you Americans who spell it wrong.

Interesting point of fact: "honour" is the incorrect spelling and American English has it right. The extra "u" is a carry-over artifact from French influences of all things and a fairly recent change (came in a couple centuries or few after the rest of Modern English basics stabilized) in the history of the language.

Really! If you have an Oxford dictionary (the real one), look it up. "Honor" was spelled "honor" originally and only about Shakespeare's time did the "u" just start creeping in, but even he preferred the "u"-less version for the bulk of his work. When Webster compiled his dictionary, he didn't change the spelling of the word, but rather went with "honor" as it was "the best spelling" (his words), the variant educated speakers used.

I tend to find it amusing as hell when someone goes off about "incorrect" American English. Odds tend to be that the traits being railed against are the way real English is spoken and the Brits are the ones who have gone off on a weird new path. Even the past two hundred years have seen some significant changes in British English that Americans have stayed true through, which is why we lack superfluous "u"s and still have our rhoticity. (There's a reason researchers from there fly over here to learn how British English was spoken in the past; want to hear Shakespearean English, the only place to find it is to go to islands off of Virginia, for instance.) The old guard of the educated used to bemoan how much English was "decaying" in the UK while it remained whole here, but now a strange inversion has occurred where folks are so used to the changes they think Americans are the one's who've lost how to use English in opposition to the truth. Current British English is a strange beast, so different than it used to be that artificially constructed accents ("Received Pronunciation", for example) have to be used for public figures as a standard to be understood by the populace, essentially a second language for everyone that no one actually speaks natively and must learn in the school systems. Now, that's bizarre. Even the French with their fetish of creating their own new vocabulary for everything to protect their language haven't gone that far.

/Sorry, this is for me like "its" it's" is for others. Something so glaringly wrong that it hurts intellectually to see the Anglocentric smugness based on falsehoods.


Yes, English keeps changing. That's the great thing about English, it adapts to new things, it changes with the times, it is happy to adopt foreign words. So whatever we say it is now is the correct way.

Saying color is "correct" because it happened to be the spelling a couple of hundred years ago is meaningless. Go back another few hundred years and it was probably spelt differently again.

Do you think we should go back to using thorn? Writing 'the' as 'ye'?

And what's this about public speakers using a different language to the common man? We have strong regional dialects but for the majority of the population they speak exactly the same as public speakers.
 
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