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(CBC)   Woman spends $1M on a house, decides to skip the $500 house inspection. Bad call   (cbc.ca) divider line 173
    More: Stupid, Carrie Forsythe, Winnipeg, home inspections  
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34466 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Nov 2012 at 12:46 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-05 05:51:04 PM

ElFugawz: [www.cbc.ca image 300x170]

This was $1M in Winnipeg? Srsly?


5000 sq ft house that may have a fair chunk of land attached to it.
 
2012-11-05 06:31:19 PM

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


in my opinion, if you have a realtor you trust and someone at the bank who is committed to you things will be a lot easier. Also, I think we really underestimated the need for closet space. Also, when you set your budget (and really put some thought into it!) make sure that everyone knows it is firm (especially your realtor) because when you look at houses the most expensive one will always be the one you want. So it better be in your budget.

We did all the walk throughs with our inspector plus had a home builder/contractor friend walk through it with us as well.

I also would not waste a lot of time on 'for sale by owner'. All the people I know who are selling their house themselves:

a) don't fix anything that is wrong with their home
b) are asking way too much
c) make it horribly inconvenient for you to see their home
 
2012-11-05 06:55:14 PM
kinda sucks but the insulation is just the pink stuff and upgrading to the blown in foam will lower her heat bills significantly, silver lining...
 
2012-11-05 07:40:03 PM
We bought our first home a few months ago, and my wife's father did the inspection. He's been a contractor for about 30 years, so he knows what to look for.

To my knowledge, a home inspection isn't mandatory in my part of Canada. But the mortgage company did require us to get a professional appraisal done on the place. (They want to be sure the house is worth at least the amount they're lending us, after all)

Also, private sales are they way to go. All you really need is a good mortgage broker and a lawyer. And you'd have to deal with those folks anyway, so why should a realtor get several thousand for essentially making a classified ad listing on MLS? Screw those parasites.
 
2012-11-05 07:59:34 PM

spidermilk: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

in my opinion, if you have a realtor you trust and someone at the bank who is committed to you things will be a lot easier. Also, I think we really underestimated the need for closet space. Also, when you set your budget (and really put some thought into it!) make sure that everyone knows it is firm (especially your realtor) because when you look at houses the most expensive one will always be the one you want. So it better be in your budget.

We did all the walk throughs with our inspector plus had a home builder/contractor friend walk through it with us as well.

I also would not waste a lot of time on 'for sale by owner'. All the people I know who are selling their house themselves:

a) don't fix anything that is wrong with their home
b) are asking way too much
c) make it horribly inconvenient for you to see their home


You know, honestly, I'm a single guy, making a decent wage. I put cash in my 401k, I feed myself and pay my bills and have toys, and still put money into savings every month, but I don't run a budget at all. I've never needed to because I live so meagerly.

I think someone posted a calculator in-thread, but anyone recommend a budget for housing stuff?
 
2012-11-05 08:00:17 PM
*ahem*

startswithabang.com
 
2012-11-05 08:06:44 PM

WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.


must be Asian immigrants...if it were Mexican immigrants or African Americans migrating in your neighborhood your house would be worth $40K instead of $400K.
 
2012-11-05 08:11:22 PM

MightyPez: Jesus. I am not a big earner by any stretch. When I was house shopping I was pinching pennies wherever I could, but I certainly didn't skip over the inspection of the place I planned to live in for a long time.


Exactly, fark this biatch
 
2012-11-05 08:22:09 PM

Xcott: I knew some people who passed on the title insurance when buying a house.

For the uninitiated, "title insurance" insures that the house you're about to buy really belongs to the seller, without any gotchas like a neighbor having a legitimate claim to half your backyard. Since it "insures" against events in the past rather than in the future, you only make a one-time payment for it. It's a typical expense along with home inspection.

Passing on the insurance for whatever reason, my friends later found that the previous owner ran a business out of his house that went into bankruptcy, and some bank claimed it was theirs. I guess they're still living in it so they got the issue resolved, but Cheeee-rist people, pay for the damn insurance.


The average person loses money on all their insurance transactions.

It isn't THAT stupid to play the odds.
 
2012-11-05 08:24:00 PM

Day_Old_Dutchie: Suddenly, MICE!
[img198.imageshack.us image 650x366]
Thousands of 'em.


yay! Sorry I love mice.
 
2012-11-05 08:52:57 PM

Unobtanium:
Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.

You can hire me to review the contract before closing, if you wish. But at that point, you're already screwed or not; you're only paying me to find out earlier. An attorney is much more helpful before the contract is signed, to make sure you understand the terms and your responsibilities.
 
2012-11-05 09:54:11 PM

kvinesknows: grokca: kvinesknows: GoldDude: Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.

yah.. dont get that. article says she was in there several times with pros of various types... no one noticed.. so why should the owner notice>?

Because mice are noisy, there was no way the previous owners could not have known there were mice in the house, unless they were deaf.

and no way the original purchaser and her numerous experts she had through the place should not have noticed either.


Depends on what time of day it was, mice tend to be nocturnal. Inspections happen during the day.
 
2012-11-05 10:32:05 PM

apiarist: Unobtanium:
Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.
You can hire me to review the contract before closing, if you wish. But at that point, you're already screwed or not; you're only paying me to find out earlier. An attorney is much more helpful before the contract is signed, to make sure you understand the terms and your responsibilities.


apiarist: Unobtanium:
Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.
You can hire me to review the contract before closing, if you wish. But at that point, you're already screwed or not; you're only paying me to find out earlier. An attorney is much more helpful before the contract is signed, to make sure you understand the terms and your responsibilities.


I suppose it depends on jurisdictions, but transfer of land can have a lot of strict rules and aren't as simple as regular transfers of property. You are often advised to get a lawyer to handle the closing to ensure it is done properly,
 
2012-11-05 11:17:20 PM

kroonermanblack: spidermilk: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

in my opinion, if you have a realtor you trust and someone at the bank who is committed to you things will be a lot easier. Also, I think we really underestimated the need for closet space. Also, when you set your budget (and really put some thought into it!) make sure that everyone knows it is firm (especially your realtor) because when you look at houses the most expensive one will always be the one you want. So it better be in your budget.

We did all the walk throughs with our inspector plus had a home builder/contractor friend walk through it with us as well.

I also would not waste a lot of time on 'for sale by owner'. All the people I know who are selling their house themselves:

a) don't fix anything that is wrong with their home
b) are asking way too much
c) make it horribly inconvenient for you to see their home

You know, honestly, I'm a single guy, making a decent wage. I put cash in my 401k, I feed myself and pay my bills and have toys, and still put money into savings every month, but I don't run a budget at all. I've never needed to because I live so meagerly.

I think someone posted a calculator in-thread, but anyone recommend a budget for housing stuff?


Here's the standard breakdown* Link

*Not applicable in places like San Francisco and New York where rent is obscene.

I used something like that when I got my first job to figure out how much I should be paying in rent. Since then, I've found much more useful advice: if you're already in good shape and you're saving as much as you want, don't worry about the rest of it. To figure out if you are saving enough, you can find any number of retirement calculators on line, or, depending on your resources, you can hire a financial advisor to help you figure out what your future looks like 40 years down the line. And, as a bonus, they'll help you make more money. It sounds like a financial advisor is what you actually want. But since you mentioned a 401k, check with the provider. They may have some free or cheap advisors you can take advantage of.
 
2012-11-06 12:21:53 AM
img198.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-06 01:38:52 AM

Summer Glau's Love Slave: [www.fabcats.org image 431x287]
If only there were some sort of creature that preyed on mice...

/Just sayin'


I wouldn't want to let cats take care of the problem. I mean, having a cat before it becomes a problem helps. They'll take care of the odd one here and there and keep the population in check. However, once there's an infestation, all the urine and feces everywhere are just as dangerous to pets as they are to people.


Mikeyworld: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Get yer credit score. That'll have more of an effect on the cost than almost anything. And remember that this is a long-term deal. Make sure the basics are solid, ya know? The bathroom is near the bedrooms. There isn't a garage door in the living room. The kitchen has ALL the necessary plumbing. And get the inspections, as this article points out.


OMFGLOL!!! My uncle's house was like that! He owns a home building company, so he had his house custom built. There's an actual living room, but there was also an attached garage which they ended up using as a second living room/family room. I guess it was insulated, but it just had a concrete floor. They put down some rugs and had furniture, a TV and a hot tub. But eventually, they turned the garage door into an actual wall, built a detached garage and added onto the house.


spentshells: Wolfy: A million bucks for a house in Winnipeg...

/Palmface.jpg

HAHAHHA you are so right on the money here. What someone with 1 million dollar house budget does is buys a 300 dollar house in the peg and 700,00 cottage in kenora


Or Falcon Lake....But I think you meant 300 thousand dollar house and 700 thousand dollar cottage.


SuperNinjaToad: WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.

must be Asian immigrants...if it were Mexican immigrants or African Americans migrating in your neighborhood your house would be worth $40K instead of $400K.


Yup. It was stated in a recent newspaper article that the second most common language in the city is not even French, but Tagalog (Filipino).
 
2012-11-06 02:18:49 AM

grokca: Depends on what time of day it was, mice tend to be nocturnal. Inspections happen during the day.


That's exactly why I have a hard time believing no one ever suspected anything that had potentially been going on for ~5 years.
Night time tends to be the quietest relatively so you would think someone would have heard something in all that time.
I knew I had a mouse about a month ago because I could hear it. That 1 mouse.
 
2012-11-06 07:43:45 AM
mice to meet u

www.biography.com
 
2012-11-06 09:12:20 AM

WalMartian: I just bought a 20-yr old home this summer that had a home warranty on it (American Home Shield). The warranty is complete crap. A total waste of money. I have another home to sell and I told my agent I will not spend a dime on an AHS warranty.


When the sink disposal started leaking all over the kitchen, we were relieved to have a warranty.

Then we found that we were constrained to their choice of service company, and has a $100 deductible. The service company claimed the 5-year-old unit had been incorrectly installed, since one of the bolts was now loose. Our claim was denied and we had to pay out of pocket, without the ability to shop around for a better price.

Complete scam. You're out the cost of the warranty PLUS the inflated prices of their "preferred" service provider, and you won't know if you're covered until they show up. Hint: If something fails early, it was improperly installed, and that's exactly what they don't cover.
 
2012-11-06 09:20:21 AM

Representative of the unwashed masses: "Now I have a shell, which I love, and it will be clean. But someone's got to help me," Forsythe said.

No, no we don't...


ronewzakcleveland.files.wordpress.com
"Someone has to pay for all these kids!"

Maybe we should hook those two up and they could help each other.
/Probably not.
 
2012-11-06 02:46:35 PM
The previous homeowner told CBC News he did not know anything about a mouse problem, adding that he would have never sold the house if he did.


You mean those stealthy critters were sneaking around you undetected, not eating a d*** thing in that house... FOR FIVE YEARS?!?!?!

Solid Mouse is the new Solid Snake.
 
2012-11-06 03:20:42 PM
Home inspections are a joke.

"...there's some damage in the , recommmend having proffesional come out for further inspections...that'll be $500"
 
2012-11-06 04:34:11 PM
That isn't the problem.
The issues are even when the inspectors misses something obvious, the inspector is only liable for up to the amount you paid him.

They need to be licensed and have standards that must be met or they bear the liability.
 
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