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(CBC)   Woman spends $1M on a house, decides to skip the $500 house inspection. Bad call   (cbc.ca) divider line 173
    More: Stupid, Carrie Forsythe, Winnipeg, home inspections  
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34481 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Nov 2012 at 12:46 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-05 12:04:13 PM  
Looks like she should have had a Holmes Inspection!

i5.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-05 12:35:09 PM  
GIS for the woman reveals this:

media.winnipegfreepress.com

Sure looks like someone willing to forgo $500 on a $1 million transaction..
 
2012-11-05 12:47:44 PM  
Jesus. I am not a big earner by any stretch. When I was house shopping I was pinching pennies wherever I could, but I certainly didn't skip over the inspection of the place I planned to live in for a long time.
 
2012-11-05 12:47:51 PM  
A million bucks for a house in Winnipeg...

/Palmface.jpg
 
2012-11-05 12:47:52 PM  
Somewhere a seller and two Real Estate agents that did practiclly nothing for their thousands of dollars are laughing their asses off.
 
2012-11-05 12:49:21 PM  

Wolfy


A million bucks for a house in Winnipeg...


Maybe that was supposed to be "half of Winnipeg".
 
2012-11-05 12:49:26 PM  
i2.listal.com
 
2012-11-05 12:49:43 PM  
Well, thats $1M Canadian......meh, thats only like $14K US.

I know, I can't really use that joke anymore....but I refuse to let it die.

/Sure as hell doesn't look like a $1M house to me. Looks like a $450K house in my neck of the woods outside of Dallas.
//Housing Markets...how do they work?
 
2012-11-05 12:50:04 PM  
As an architect i'm going to put her name down as a Client To Turn Down.
 
Skr
2012-11-05 12:50:06 PM  
These instances always sound like horrible cases of denial and blue sky wishful thinking. Hire your own inspectors and do all of the walk throughs including the final walk through. Everyone is out to fark you and it is always best to have a few more pairs of eyes to catch on to it.
 
2012-11-05 12:50:09 PM  
It looks like they're testing missiles on that house.


/too obscure?
 
2012-11-05 12:51:24 PM  

JMel: Well, thats $1M Canadian......meh, thats only like $14K US.

I know, I can't really use that joke anymore....but I refuse to let it die.

/Sure as hell doesn't look like a $1M house to me. Looks like a $450K house in my neck of the woods outside of Dallas.
//Housing Markets...how do they work?


this one has a toilet... which ups its sale value in Winnipeg.
 
2012-11-05 12:51:42 PM  
Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.
 
2012-11-05 12:51:46 PM  
Even if the guy is an idiot, it's insurance. Although if I had a cool million to spend on a house, well fark if I would care. It's just some chump change.
 
2012-11-05 12:52:08 PM  
It could have been worse. In addition to the rodents in the walls, her unfortunately-racist-named cat could have led her to a subterranean hell-scape below the house where she could have had the very sanity blasted out of her head by the revelation of a Terrible Ancient Secret that would have caused her to dine upon her neighbor to the accompaniment of the infernal piping of a blind idiot Elder God.

So at least she's got that going for her.
 
2012-11-05 12:53:21 PM  

Forsythe said she did not get the home inspected before purchasing it, but she did go in with contractors, engineers and architects several times before the handover and no one noticed anything wrong.
...
The previous homeowner told CBC News he did not know anything about a mouse problem, adding that he would have never sold the house if he did.

Forsythe believes he had to have known, but Jeffrey said it is possible the previous owner may not have seen mice in the house, which was constructed with thick walls and thick insulation.


So none of her "contractors, engineers and architects" noticed anything but she thinks the previous owner "had to have known"?
 
2012-11-05 12:54:03 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


hook up with some 80 year old grandma.. bang the life out of her (and the house)
 
2012-11-05 12:54:07 PM  
I knew some people who passed on the title insurance when buying a house.

For the uninitiated, "title insurance" insures that the house you're about to buy really belongs to the seller, without any gotchas like a neighbor having a legitimate claim to half your backyard. Since it "insures" against events in the past rather than in the future, you only make a one-time payment for it. It's a typical expense along with home inspection.

Passing on the insurance for whatever reason, my friends later found that the previous owner ran a business out of his house that went into bankruptcy, and some bank claimed it was theirs. I guess they're still living in it so they got the issue resolved, but Cheeee-rist people, pay for the damn insurance.
 
2012-11-05 12:54:19 PM  

markie_farkie: GIS for the woman reveals this:

[media.winnipegfreepress.com image 240x327]

Sure looks like someone willing to forgo $500 on a $1 million transaction..


Is she hiding a tennis ball in her lower jaw?
 
2012-11-05 12:54:19 PM  

Skr: These instances always sound like horrible cases of denial and blue sky wishful thinking. Hire your own inspectors and do all of the walk throughs including the final walk through. Everyone is out to fark you and it is always best to have a few more pairs of eyes to catch on to it.


My realtor would actively point out every instance of termites, possible rats, flood damage, etc, every possible chance he could, and he had a good eye for it. We definitely knew we could trust him to get the skinny on a place.

/But that was because he was trying to get us to buy a new place for 5 times as much as the places we wanted.
 
2012-11-05 12:55:11 PM  
An inspection is money well spent. What a stupid coont.
 
2012-11-05 12:55:21 PM  
www.fabcats.org
If only there were some sort of creature that preyed on mice... 

/Just sayin'
 
2012-11-05 12:57:27 PM  
I don't know how much of a case she has against the seller. I'm assuming they have some sort of boilerplate "we swear we don't know anything about the NIMH colony living in every wall of the house" language in the contract, but I don't know how you'd go about proving the seller didn't know anything.
 
2012-11-05 12:57:30 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


I would start by saving money for a down payment. Then I would go looking for something small, bizarre, and cheap in your area. Then I would apply for a ten year loan and subsequently pay that off month by month. I would definitely skip the home inspection though. It's not like someone is going to miss a historic mouse infestation or something
 
2012-11-05 12:59:17 PM  
Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.
 
2012-11-05 12:59:48 PM  

Xcott: I knew some people who passed on the title insurance when buying a house.

For the uninitiated, "title insurance" insures that the house you're about to buy really belongs to the seller, without any gotchas like a neighbor having a legitimate claim to half your backyard. Since it "insures" against events in the past rather than in the future, you only make a one-time payment for it. It's a typical expense along with home inspection.

Passing on the insurance for whatever reason, my friends later found that the previous owner ran a business out of his house that went into bankruptcy, and some bank claimed it was theirs. I guess they're still living in it so they got the issue resolved, but Cheeee-rist people, pay for the damn insurance.


Something that's less common and hardly anyone ever knows about until they get bitten in the ass is address insurance - that the place you're buying really is where you think it is. It's mostly for big lots and open lots, but it pops up now and then on old subdivided city lots too. An old boss many years ago bought a lot with a billboard on it, paid a premium price for it, and was pretty screwed when it turned out the billboard wasn't part of the metes and bounds of the particular address he bought.

Cities are slowly digitizing all of this stuff so you don't have to wait in line at the clerk's for six hours to pull it yourself (which is what you pay title and address insurance for), but it's all something you have to think about.
 
2012-11-05 01:00:27 PM  
FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"
 
2012-11-05 01:00:47 PM  
Ha!

/inspector
 
2012-11-05 01:01:07 PM  
My dad is a retired contractor and has done countless inspections. I'd have him go through any potential home purchase.

Then I'd hire someone to do it as well..
 
2012-11-05 01:01:08 PM  
Rich people's problems... meh.
 
2012-11-05 01:03:08 PM  

GoldDude: Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.


yah.. dont get that. article says she was in there several times with pros of various types... no one noticed.. so why should the owner notice>?
 
2012-11-05 01:03:28 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: [www.fabcats.org image 431x287]
If only there were some sort of creature that preyed on mice... 

/Just sayin'


Offtopic, can we turn tomorrow into a cat themed day with little to no election coverage? Maybe we can elect the best cat?
 
2012-11-05 01:03:39 PM  
Homes that have been featured on Hoarders should have that fact noted on title.
 
2012-11-05 01:04:49 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


Why do a short mortgage right now? This is the cheapest pool of capital you'll ever have access to, get a 30 year fixed on a house you can afford and drop everything else into investments. That's what I did, refinanced into a new 30 year and took the difference and dropped it into an IRA, that pot of money will grow at a lot more than 3.85%!
 
2012-11-05 01:05:43 PM  

MindStalker


Offtopic, can we turn tomorrow into a cat themed day with little to no election coverage? Maybe we can elect the best cat?


It would probably just turn into Democats v Repawblicans.
 
2012-11-05 01:06:47 PM  

lifeboat: FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"


Hmm....apparently in Canada they don't have "caveat emptor" cuz once you are in the house, it belongs to you beneficiary of the home buying contract. Being a recent home buyer, there was a line of verbage in my house buying contract specifically dealing with this stuff. It went to the effect of anything in this house is your problem now. No one will help you and you have no recourse if something is really dorked up. Remember, you are still responsible for your mortgage.
 
2012-11-05 01:07:04 PM  
I inspect for HUD. No way a competent person could not have known.
 
2012-11-05 01:07:52 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.



Go for a long term note if interest rates are near those for shorter term. Double/triple/quad up on principal payments. Gives you a safety net if the unforeseen occurs.

/Has worked for me since 1968.
//Have never had a note of any kind run to term
///Haven't borrowed money for auto/real estate since 1992
////Re: the "highly leveraged" folks (know it's a '70s/80's term): May never be as rich as they, but it's for damned sure I'll never be as broke as they can be.
 
2012-11-05 01:08:31 PM  

Morrius: It looks like they're testing missiles on that house.


/too obscure?


1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-11-05 01:08:40 PM  
Let me be the first to tell you that a home inspection doesn't mean dick. Pretty much all of them have contracts with words to the effect of "I'm only liable for things I'm smart enough to see, diligent enough to describe and stupid enough to not tell you about.". If there's a fault the inspector doesn't see, like a $25,000 hole in the foundation that he called "a minor crack and nothing to worry about" next to "some stonework that might cause problems" of exactly the type he said they hadn't caused, or a fire hazard in the basement bathroom from some moron linking the dryer vent to the bathroom fan despite 26 years of lint making the vent impassable, some asshole kleenex as a building material, exposed 220V wiring behind a leaky shower that I happened to discover with a goddamned drywall saw, etc., you have zero recourse. None. Not against the inspector. Not against the previous owner. The inspector didn't see it, you can't prove the owner knew, fix it yourself, fark you, next case.

/yeah, imadbro
 
2012-11-05 01:09:52 PM  

lifeboat: FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"


This is what turns the article from "ha ha, what a typical cheap rich bastard" to "ergh goddamnitsomuchthisiswhywecan'thavenicethings!!!" and yes, those are technical terms.
 
2012-11-05 01:11:07 PM  

JMel: Well, thats $1M Canadian......meh, thats only like $14K US.

I know, I can't really use that joke anymore....but I refuse to let it die.

/Sure as hell doesn't look like a $1M house to me. Looks like a $450K house in my neck of the woods outside of Dallas.
//Housing Markets...how do they work?


And in California, that's an $8 mil house.
 
2012-11-05 01:11:43 PM  

Flakeloaf: Let me be the first to tell you that a home inspection doesn't mean dick. Pretty much all of them have contracts with words to the effect of "I'm only liable for things I'm smart enough to see, diligent enough to describe and stupid enough to not tell you about.". If there's a fault the inspector doesn't see, like a $25,000 hole in the foundation that he called "a minor crack and nothing to worry about" next to "some stonework that might cause problems" of exactly the type he said they hadn't caused, or a fire hazard in the basement bathroom from some moron linking the dryer vent to the bathroom fan despite 26 years of lint making the vent impassable, some asshole kleenex as a building material, exposed 220V wiring behind a leaky shower that I happened to discover with a goddamned drywall saw, etc., you have zero recourse. None. Not against the inspector. Not against the previous owner. The inspector didn't see it, you can't prove the owner knew, fix it yourself, fark you, next case.

/yeah, imadbro


THIS
 
2012-11-05 01:12:22 PM  
The reason you have an inspection is so you have legal recourse to back out of a deal before you close (and still keep your good-faith deposit). If you find something horrific like this, you're only out the money for the inspection, which pales in comparison to anything it may find (just doing a Radon test for an additional 100$ on top of our typical inspection up here saved us 1000$ by forcing the sellers to fix it).

Not only is it expected that you get an inspection, but if you are one of the 4 dumbasses that year who decided to waive your inspection, you basically waive any and all legal recourse in the purchase of your home related to inspection contingencies because, I don't know, YOU HAD A CHOICE TO INSPECT THE PROPERTY BEFORE CLOSING THE DEAL AND YOU WAIVED THAT RIGHT ON PAPER. Granted, there may not have been explicit language on the documents waiving the inspection, but before the deal is closed, both sides agree that all contingencies have been met to their satisfaction, which is a nice blanket way of saying, "we're done here, no other issues can be brought up anymore" unless one side had provable criminal negligence in trying to cover up the infestation / whatever it was.

With the infestation being deep in the walls and nothing being visible, as well as waiving the inspection, this woman deserves what she gets through her own gross negligence of treating the purchase of a 1m. home as an emotional investment and not a business transaction.
 
2012-11-05 01:12:52 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


Get yer credit score. That'll have more of an effect on the cost than almost anything. And remember that this is a long-term deal. Make sure the basics are solid, ya know? The bathroom is near the bedrooms. There isn't a garage door in the living room. The kitchen has ALL the necessary plumbing. And get the inspections, as this article points out.
 
2012-11-05 01:14:23 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


Every single person even remotely connected with the home building, buying or contracting industry is a crook.

If you know that, and go into it with your eyes open, you should be fine.
 
2012-11-05 01:15:24 PM  
Forsythe said she did not get the home inspected before purchasing it, but she did go in with contractors, engineers and architects several times before the handover and no one noticed anything wrong.

well, okay - then chances are the inspector would have missed it too.
 
2012-11-05 01:17:56 PM  
In Canada, do they not require, or suggest, Pest Inspections? eh? That's pretty much foremost in my mind when looking to move into a new place: what kind of creepy crawly chewing nest building stinging fungal growth molding carcinogenic gas seeping THINGS EXIST IN THIS PLACE I know nothing about but where I'm going to live.
 
2012-11-05 01:18:33 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


Yeah. Rent.

/Home ownership is overrated.
 
2012-11-05 01:20:00 PM  

jiggitysmith: The reason you have an inspection is so you have legal recourse to back out of a deal before you close (and still keep your good-faith deposit). If you find something horrific like this, you're only out the money for the inspection, which pales in comparison to anything it may find (just doing a Radon test for an additional 100$ on top of our typical inspection up here saved us 1000$ by forcing the sellers to fix it).


Your realtor is also intensely aware of this and will happily recommend the fastest, cheapest replacement referee to rubberstamp the place as acceptable so the deal can close. Anyone who shows up with a hygrometer and a radon detector will never ever be invited back. Find someone who makes your realtor's skin crawl and blood turn to blood and hire that guy.
 
2012-11-05 01:20:20 PM  

Marcintosh: Forsythe said she did not get the home inspected before purchasing it, but she did go in with contractors, engineers and architects several times before the handover and no one noticed anything wrong.

well, okay - then chances are the inspector would have missed it too.


The problem is that this was the engineer:
copescreations.com
 
2012-11-05 01:21:29 PM  

DeathCipris: lifeboat: FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"

Hmm....apparently in Canada they don't have "caveat emptor" cuz once you are in the house, it belongs to you beneficiary of the home buying contract. Being a recent home buyer, there was a line of verbage in my house buying contract specifically dealing with this stuff. It went to the effect of anything in this house is your problem now. No one will help you and you have no recourse if something is really dorked up. Remember, you are still responsible for your mortgage.


I know in Ontario you are liable if you knowingly misled the purchaser (i.e. if the old owners knew about the mice, they are liable).

As for the home inspection, most of the time they are pretty terrible and generally end up bearing less responsibility than the previous owners. Yeah it is good because they will generally notice massive issues, but they aren't particularly good unless you have someone you know personally and trust (i.e. a family member or friend). These guys need to be licensed and held liable for what they miss.
 
2012-11-05 01:25:12 PM  

jiggitysmith: The reason you have an inspection is so you have legal recourse to back out of a deal before you close (and still keep your good-faith deposit). If you find something horrific like this, you're only out the money for the inspection, which pales in comparison to anything it may find (just doing a Radon test for an additional 100$ on top of our typical inspection up here saved us 1000$ by forcing the sellers to fix it).


I backed out of a house deal because of the home inspection.

\Many of the structural beams were more termite than wood.
 
2012-11-05 01:25:27 PM  
She must have paid cash for the house. One cannot get a mortgage without an inspection, not even in Canada. Eh?
 
2012-11-05 01:26:15 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: /Just sayin'


Where have you been? There have been a couple of threads which had room for a Summer reference, I was left to carry the burden alone.

/just finished re-watching The SC Chronicles.
// Fake, but, well...NSFW
///SFW eye-candy
www.fansshare.com
 
2012-11-05 01:27:11 PM  

JackieRabbit: She must have paid cash for the house. One cannot get a mortgage without an inspection, not even in Canada. Eh?


You're thinking of insurance. Most lenders don't give a baboon's bright red ass what state the house is in, they just want to be sure the money they lend you is coming back.
 
2012-11-05 01:27:55 PM  
A house inspection saved my wife and I from buying a termite infested place. Definitely worth the money; not just for catching this kind of stuff, but also letting you know what you'll want to do after you buy the place.
 
2012-11-05 01:28:51 PM  
WTF??? How could a normal person not simply smell that mess walking inside?? Rotting dead mice, feces, urine, etc.!!! The noise from walking and squeaking? The heat from thousands of tiny bodies? How could anyone miss an infestation that large? I'm certain that an inspection was not the only way to discover the thousands of mice.
 
2012-11-05 01:28:51 PM  

Odd Bird: Summer Glau's Love Slave: /Just sayin'

Where have you been? There have been a couple of threads which had room for a Summer reference, I was left to carry the burden alone.

/just finished re-watching The SC Chronicles.
// Fake, but, well...NSFW
///SFW eye-candy
[www.fansshare.com image 440x368]


ah the yngwie malmsteen pose

images.uulyrics.com
 
2012-11-05 01:29:41 PM  

kaseyfarksdaladies: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Yeah. Rent.

/Home ownership is overrated.


Yeah,rent...You're gonna pay for shelter the rest of your LIFE. Ya might as well get money in return. Rent is throwing your bucks down a black hole: You pay, the money goes, you live in a shelter for another month. If you own (Ha! The bank will own it longer than you ever will), there's a return on it. Your equity goes up and you'll have a back-up savings. a re-fi after ten years, when you've settled into a steady income, can be used to shorten the loan, or lengthen it to get more money monthly. Unless you're planning on moving about the country, ownership is a better deal financially
 
2012-11-05 01:29:46 PM  

dywed88: DeathCipris: lifeboat: FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"

Hmm....apparently in Canada they don't have "caveat emptor" cuz once you are in the house, it belongs to you beneficiary of the home buying contract. Being a recent home buyer, there was a line of verbage in my house buying contract specifically dealing with this stuff. It went to the effect of anything in this house is your problem now. No one will help you and you have no recourse if something is really dorked up. Remember, you are still responsible for your mortgage.

I know in Ontario you are liable if you knowingly misled the purchaser (i.e. if the old owners knew about the mice, they are liable).
As for the home inspection, most of the time they are pretty terrible and generally end up bearing less responsibility than the previous owners. Yeah it is good because they will generally notice massive issues, but they aren't particularly good unless you have someone you know personally and trust (i.e. a family member or friend). These guys need to be licensed and held liable for what they miss.



Oh yea, if they tried to hide it from you on purpose then they can be held liable.
How so very true tho...my home inspector missed some many things; it was unbelievable. Some of this stuff was a serious WTF? Supposedly "tested" the AC, totally didn't cuz that damn compressor was busted and there is no way that thing shot out cool air. But eh, what are you gonna do...tis why I bought a home warranty. 
BTW, side note, but there was a possible new home buyer here...hope they are still reading this so...
BUY A HOME WARRANTY. IT IS A VERY VERY GOOD INVESTMENT AND IT ONLY TAKES ONE PROBLEM TO GET YOUR MONEY'S WORTH.
 
2012-11-05 01:32:01 PM  
I Renovate houses for a living and I have a client who had an inspection. The contract for the inspector limits what they can do while looking, to the point that it is basically a waste of time and money.
one small example: There was a switch that wasn't working, but he wasn't allowed to even take the cover plate off and wave a voltage tester around. Had he taken the cover plate off, the switch would have fallen to the floor, no need to test it, it wasn't attached to anything.
I was through the house in 4 hours and had a list of must fix, should fix, and a list of nice to do's. The not working switch and a cold radiator were the only things on his list. (the water to the radiator had been turned off) turn it on, bleed the air and it worked like new.

I find it a little weird the contractor didn't see some something his first time through. But it looks like all this damage was behind the drywall. I also wonder about the previous owner never having heard any little critter scurrying noises.
 
2012-11-05 01:32:11 PM  

JackieRabbit: She must have paid cash for the house. One cannot get a mortgage without an inspection, not even in Canada. Eh?


yes you can
 
2012-11-05 01:32:15 PM  

kvinesknows: GoldDude: Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.

yah.. dont get that. article says she was in there several times with pros of various types... no one noticed.. so why should the owner notice>?


Because mice are noisy, there was no way the previous owners could not have known there were mice in the house, unless they were deaf.
 
2012-11-05 01:33:20 PM  

Flakeloaf: Let me be the first to tell you that a home inspection doesn't mean dick. Pretty much all of them have contracts with words to the effect of "I'm only liable for things I'm smart enough to see, diligent enough to describe and stupid enough to not tell you about.". If there's a fault the inspector doesn't see, like a $25,000 hole in the foundation that he called "a minor crack and nothing to worry about" next to "some stonework that might cause problems" of exactly the type he said they hadn't caused, or a fire hazard in the basement bathroom from some moron linking the dryer vent to the bathroom fan despite 26 years of lint making the vent impassable, some asshole kleenex as a building material, exposed 220V wiring behind a leaky shower that I happened to discover with a goddamned drywall saw, etc., you have zero recourse. None. Not against the inspector. Not against the previous owner. The inspector didn't see it, you can't prove the owner knew, fix it yourself, fark you, next case.

/yeah, imadbro


We had a lame inspector when we bought the house we are in now but rodent piss has a distinct smell and somebody had to have known it was there. I can't muster up a lot of sympathy for her.

Don't have your home inspected by a friend of the agent that wants to close the deal.
 
2012-11-05 01:34:27 PM  

grokca: kvinesknows: GoldDude: Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.

yah.. dont get that. article says she was in there several times with pros of various types... no one noticed.. so why should the owner notice>?

Because mice are noisy, there was no way the previous owners could not have known there were mice in the house, unless they were deaf.


and no way the original purchaser and her numerous experts she had through the place should not have noticed either.
 
2012-11-05 01:35:44 PM  
What a million dollar house in Canada may look like:

0.tqn.com

/'cause it's cold up there
 
2012-11-05 01:35:52 PM  
"Now I have a shell, which I love, and it will be clean. But someone's got to help me," Forsythe said.

No, no we don't...
 
2012-11-05 01:36:36 PM  

Flakeloaf: Let me be the first to tell you that a home inspection doesn't mean dick. Pretty much all of them have contracts with words to the effect of "I'm only liable for things I'm smart enough to see, diligent enough to describe and stupid enough to not tell you about.". If there's a fault the inspector doesn't see, like a $25,000 hole in the foundation that he called "a minor crack and nothing to worry about" next to "some stonework that might cause problems" of exactly the type he said they hadn't caused, or a fire hazard in the basement bathroom from some moron linking the dryer vent to the bathroom fan despite 26 years of lint making the vent impassable, some asshole kleenex as a building material, exposed 220V wiring behind a leaky shower that I happened to discover with a goddamned drywall saw, etc., you have zero recourse. None. Not against the inspector. Not against the previous owner. The inspector didn't see it, you can't prove the owner knew, fix it yourself, fark you, next case.

/yeah, imadbro


This needs repeating.
 
2012-11-05 01:37:11 PM  

Jon iz teh kewl: ah the yngwie malmsteen pose


Heh heh, were you the one who made another visual comparison to Yngwie in a thread last week?
 
2012-11-05 01:38:55 PM  
Somebody should help her? Who? The government? Taxpayers?

What a dingbat.
 
2012-11-05 01:39:37 PM  
It takes a lot of mouse poop to do that to the ceilings. Must have been a shiat ton of them there. Before I bought my home my last apt started to get mice right before I moved out. I caught a bunch. They were probably getting in through the back door of the complex, because every time it rained it would flood the basement level ummmm "terrace" level. Al they would have had to do was dig a drainaige trench there and no more floods.
 
2012-11-05 01:40:21 PM  

Odd Bird: Jon iz teh kewl: ah the yngwie malmsteen pose

Heh heh, were you the one who made another visual comparison to Yngwie in a thread last week?


no.

www.galeon.com
 
2012-11-05 01:40:43 PM  

Flakeloaf: jiggitysmith: The reason you have an inspection is so you have legal recourse to back out of a deal before you close (and still keep your good-faith deposit). If you find something horrific like this, you're only out the money for the inspection, which pales in comparison to anything it may find (just doing a Radon test for an additional 100$ on top of our typical inspection up here saved us 1000$ by forcing the sellers to fix it).


Your realtor is also intensely aware of this and will happily recommend the fastest, cheapest replacement referee to rubberstamp the place as acceptable so the deal can close. Anyone who shows up with a hygrometer and a radon detector will never ever be invited back. Find someone who makes your realtor's skin crawl and blood turn to blood and hire that guy.


My realtor suggested a guy just like that. But then my wife went to grade school with him, and I went to high school and college with him. So we had a personal relationship, but I don't think he'd try to screw us even if he didn't know us, he's an exceptionally honest guy.
 
2012-11-05 01:40:47 PM  
Your realtor is also intensely aware of this and will happily recommend the fastest, cheapest replacement referee to rubberstamp the place as acceptable so the deal can close. Anyone who shows up with a hygrometer and a radon detector will never ever be invited back. Find someone who makes your realtor's skin crawl and blood turn to blood and hire that guy.

This was not our experience, but I think I can elaborate what you're saying. about 95% of realtors we've met were complete jerkoff stupid lying jackholes who will go out of their way to complete a sale regardless of whatever situation it puts you in. These winners will tell you only positive things about a house no matter how shiatty it is and most of them don't have a clue what they're doing. If you ask them anything that might derive from their experience or intelligence, you will be left with a dry hole because most of them feel out of place saying 'oh this place won't be fanciable due to the foundation / obvious whatever damage let's move on,' since they aren't they inspector. Find a realtor that won't lie to you, this is probably the hardest part in buying a house.

As far as rubber stamp inspectors, if you were wronged by this kind of situation, you may have some recourse as they are legally bound by the inspection results. Granted, an easy out for them is omitting tests, etc because they 'didn't know' and they typically will list everything that is inspected, not what is not inspected.

Fortunately, since we got a good realtor, he recommended a very thorough inspector (who costs more than most) and recommended extra inspections/tests based on the house construction and that situation. If I were buying a 1 million dollar house, I'd be ordering up ALL of the inspection extras.
 
2012-11-05 01:40:56 PM  
inspeactors are overrated anyway... The one I got didn;t even realized my freaking furnace was broke!.. they are bascially looking at things that are external. In this case since everything was inside the walls no way an inspector would know about it unless the evidence were very obvious which doesn't seemed to be in this case. The only reason she knew was because she did renovation and they tore the walls down etc...
 
2012-11-05 01:40:57 PM  

grokca: kvinesknows: GoldDude: Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.

yah.. dont get that. article says she was in there several times with pros of various types... no one noticed.. so why should the owner notice>?

Because mice are noisy, there was no way the previous owners could not have known there were mice in the house, unless they were deaf.


And lacking any olfactory perception.

/I never knew such a tiny dead animal could smell so bad
 
2012-11-05 01:42:36 PM  

Mikeyworld: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Get yer credit score. That'll have more of an effect on the cost than almost anything.


If you haven't already approached your financial institution, consider a credit union; their rates are more dependable than banks and they tend to not be bought out in epic fashion. If you can swing it, a 15-year mortgage but if you have to go the 30-year route, make sure you pay an additional $10.00 per month on the mortgage - you will save a butt-load of money.

Title insurance (AKA: Abstract Insurance.) Do not say "no" to this.

Check to see if the potential home is located in a flood zone. Probably not likely in your area but you never know. Insurance companies generally do not cover floods but the Feds offer reasonable policies on a yearly basis. It might also be in your best interest to have a radon inspection, especially if there is a basement involved.

Find a home under your limit (duh) and be willing to walk away from the negotiations if the seller is a jerk.
 
2012-11-05 01:42:45 PM  
whenhespeaks.com

What the inspector might have found
 
2012-11-05 01:44:15 PM  

Wolfy: A million bucks for a house in Winnipeg...

/Palmface.jpg


HAHAHHA you are so right on the money here. What someone with 1 million dollar house budget does is buys a 300 dollar house in the peg and 700,00 cottage in kenora
 
2012-11-05 01:44:52 PM  
obviously I meant 300000 dollar house
 
2012-11-05 01:46:03 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: Forsythe said she did not get the home inspected before purchasing it, but she did go in with contractors, engineers and architects several times before the handover and no one noticed anything wrong.
...
The previous homeowner told CBC News he did not know anything about a mouse problem, adding that he would have never sold the house if he did.

Forsythe believes he had to have known, but Jeffrey said it is possible the previous owner may not have seen mice in the house, which was constructed with thick walls and thick insulation.


So none of her "contractors, engineers and architects" noticed anything but she thinks the previous owner "had to have known"?


Heh, this reminds me of that family guy bit with mickey mouse farking in the walls
 
2012-11-05 01:48:16 PM  

Flakeloaf: JackieRabbit: She must have paid cash for the house. One cannot get a mortgage without an inspection, not even in Canada. Eh?

You're thinking of insurance. Most lenders don't give a baboon's bright red ass what state the house is in, they just want to be sure the money they lend you is coming back.


Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law). On my second house, they found some water damage and evidence of termites on the property, though no infestation. They required the seller to repair the damage and treat the property for termites and provide a termite letter before they would approve the mortgage. All my insurance company cared about was that they bank was satisfied with the condition of the property and the real value of the property.
 
2012-11-05 01:50:16 PM  

JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)


in what country/province/state??
 
2012-11-05 01:53:26 PM  
Suddenly, MICE!
img198.imageshack.us
Thousands of 'em.
 
2012-11-05 01:54:13 PM  
Call Mike Holmes
 
2012-11-05 01:58:13 PM  
One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?
 
2012-11-05 01:59:47 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: her unfortunately-racist-named cat


My google-fu is weak. What is said cat's unfortunate name?
 
2012-11-05 02:00:27 PM  
So much this:
 
2012-11-05 02:00:59 PM  
Also:

"What are feces?"

"Baby mice."

"Awwww!"
 
2012-11-05 02:01:15 PM  
 
2012-11-05 02:02:00 PM  

kvinesknows: JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)

in what country/province/state??


The United States for any mortgage product backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. This includes most standard, not-jumbo mortgages, though certainly not all.
 
2012-11-05 02:02:33 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: As an architect i'm going to put her name down as a Client To Turn Down.


I will mark her on my list as well. Reminds me of clients who want a 700 SqFt double-height foyer, then asks us to spec $0.89 sq/ft laminate flooring she found on sale at Lumber Liquidators. Volume over quality, saving money in the wrong places.
 
2012-11-05 02:02:39 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: [www.fabcats.org image 431x287]
If only there were some sort of creature that preyed on mice... 

/Just sayin'


Then you'd have to send in these to get the cats out of the wall:
www.painteddog.org

Then a:
www.learnersdictionary.com

Next a:
upload.wikimedia.org

Well, you know how it goes.
 
2012-11-05 02:03:28 PM  

LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?


meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.
 
2012-11-05 02:04:03 PM  

JackieRabbit: kvinesknows: JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)

in what country/province/state??

The United States for any mortgage product backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. This includes most standard, not-jumbo mortgages, though certainly not all.


this story being from Canada........
 
2012-11-05 02:07:19 PM  
Canada is facing an epic housing crash. They're where the US was in 2007.

Canadians will deny this. In a year, when it happens, they will deny denying this.
 
2012-11-05 02:10:58 PM  

jiggitysmith:
As far as rubber stamp inspectors, if you were wronged by this kind of situation, you may have some recourse as they are legally bound by the inspection results. Granted, an easy out for them is omitting tests, etc because they 'didn't know' and they typically will list everything that is inspected, not what is not inspected.


Home inspectors in Ontario do not need a license, and their indemnity is limited to the price paid for their services.

www.wearysloth.com

"Oh, you don't want his help."
 
2012-11-05 02:11:08 PM  

hoots_toot_ochaye: Looks like she should have had a Holmes Inspection!


Done in one. Came looking for this.

For farks sake people, get the inspection.
 
2012-11-05 02:11:26 PM  
Wow, a lot of you seem to have had shiatty inspectors. Do your own reasearch on them, don't go with the one your realtor suggests unless you know and trust the realtor, and don't go with the cheapest inspector either.No problems when I bought my house, except the dbag underwriters wouldnt give me my loan until I fixed the evidence of termites in a shed 50 yards from the house...
 
2012-11-05 02:14:10 PM  

robodog: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Why do a short mortgage right now? This is the cheapest pool of capital you'll ever have access to, get a 30 year fixed on a house you can afford and drop everything else into investments. That's what I did, refinanced into a new 30 year and took the difference and dropped it into an IRA, that pot of money will grow at a lot more than 3.85%!


Because I'm money stupid and have no clue wtf you're talking about.

That would probably help :(.

My thought was 'same price as renting but hopefully worth something at some point with no more rent'.
 
2012-11-05 02:14:17 PM  
Ill just leave this here.
Hoarders Rat Man

/My skin still crawls a little.
 
2012-11-05 02:14:25 PM  

JackieRabbit: kvinesknows: JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)

in what country/province/state??

The United States for any mortgage product backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. This includes most standard, not-jumbo mortgages, though certainly not all.


Not true. Fannie/Freddy only require NPMA33, sometimes a 5 year roof certification. but only a fool would waive inspection.

Only hire an inspector with E&O insurance, never use someone recommended by a realtor. ask your lawyer for recommendations.
 
2012-11-05 02:18:32 PM  

Submitter: Woman spends $1M on a house, decides to skip the $500 house inspection. Bad call


FTFY, subbie
 
2012-11-05 02:21:31 PM  

kroonermanblack: robodog: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Why do a short mortgage right now? This is the cheapest pool of capital you'll ever have access to, get a 30 year fixed on a house you can afford and drop everything else into investments. That's what I did, refinanced into a new 30 year and took the difference and dropped it into an IRA, that pot of money will grow at a lot more than 3.85%!

Because I'm money stupid and have no clue wtf you're talking about.

That would probably help :(.

My thought was 'same price as renting but hopefully worth something at some point with no more rent'.


Plus once you lock in a mortgage rate, it will never go up, rent does. People that bought 30 years ago are living in 2000 sq. ft. houses with $600 mortgage payments, that sounds ridiculous to us now, but it takes time and inflation to show that owning is better than renting.
 
2012-11-05 02:27:32 PM  
just weighing in, in case people are still browsing looking for advice.

it is absolutely worth the money to get a home inspection... but it is also absolutely dependent on finding a good company that does a thorough job. when i bought my first home the owner of the inspection company came and did the survey. and he was a maniac of thoroughness. he spent more than 4 hours combing over every square inch of a 700 sq ft house. he generated something like 50 pages of material on what he found. all the way down to noting which outlets had their polarity wrong, which of the asbestos shingles on the siding had cracks of what size, on and on and on. as impressed as i was, i called the same company to inspect my next house, and got some loser employee who was basically phoning in the inspection. LUCKILY, there were severe problems so obvious that even without as much gusto as i'd like, the guy spotted them and i nixed the purchase.

next comes the tricky part... and somebody here already mentioned it: an inspection does not give you automatic recourse if something goes wrong. what it gives you is information. and information is only useful if you USE IT. go through the report, read it. ALL of it. read it again. all that information is only useful to you if you let it inform you in your purchase decision.... and it's useful to leverage price negotiation. it does not give you "get out of house free card", because as it has been said, if the inspector misses something, tough luck.

the next thing i saw mentioned and highly advise, is buying the house warranty. but again, you've really got to do your homework (in conjunction with that inspection you got ... to figure out what's likely to go wrong), because just like with any other insurance you buy - the goal of the company selling it to you IS TO MAKE A PROFIT. they don't want to pay for anything, EVER. and some companies are really good at not doing that. so you need to do your diligence and find out what kind of documentation you need to get things fixed on their dime. what kind of situations they will and won't cover. etc etc etc. homework homework homework.

as far as advice for anyone looking to buy? ugh. personally i'll never own another place that isn't investment - it ties you to an area regardless of what job prospects do, it obligates you to an extended debt, it ties a LOT of money into a thing that usually will just keep trying to fall apart on you. that being said, if you're intent on buying instead of renting, the interest rates are AWESOME now, so it's a good time to get into the market. i would seriously consider commute to work AND what potential rental rates in that area might be. you never know if you're going to have to relocate, and being able to rent your house at or above your mortgage payment gives you that flexibility.

/go for concrete block construction. 
/if you can afford a duplex, go for that.
 
2012-11-05 02:29:23 PM  

kroonermanblack: robodog: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Why do a short mortgage right now? This is the cheapest pool of capital you'll ever have access to, get a 30 year fixed on a house you can afford and drop everything else into investments. That's what I did, refinanced into a new 30 year and took the difference and dropped it into an IRA, that pot of money will grow at a lot more than 3.85%!

Because I'm money stupid and have no clue wtf you're talking about.

That would probably help :(.

My thought was 'same price as renting but hopefully worth something at some point with no more rent'.


Here's a calculator that may help you: Link
 
2012-11-05 02:30:35 PM  

Flakeloaf: Let me be the first to tell you that a home inspection doesn't mean dick. Pretty much all of them have contracts with words to the effect of "I'm only liable for things I'm smart enough to see, diligent enough to describe and stupid enough to not tell you about.". If there's a fault the inspector doesn't see, like a $25,000 hole in the foundation that he called "a minor crack and nothing to worry about" next to "some stonework that might cause problems" of exactly the type he said they hadn't caused, or a fire hazard in the basement bathroom from some moron linking the dryer vent to the bathroom fan despite 26 years of lint making the vent impassable, some asshole kleenex as a building material, exposed 220V wiring behind a leaky shower that I happened to discover with a goddamned drywall saw, etc., you have zero recourse. None. Not against the inspector. Not against the previous owner. The inspector didn't see it, you can't prove the owner knew, fix it yourself, fark you, next case.

/yeah, imadbro


If you get an inspection thinking it's anything other than essentially just somebody who is familiar with what to look for going through the place doing a visual inspection, then yeah, you're fooling yourself. An inspector might not have even caught this if nobody else noticed until they started ripping out walls.

However, I'll always shell out the cash for one. Find one that's well reviewed both online and preferably by people you know as well. I backed out on a place when we were looking just recently because the inspector noticed scorching and double taping of copper and aluminum wiring in the electrical box. Would have had to replace the whole electrical system if we'd gone with that place.
 
2012-11-05 02:33:03 PM  
I know a mouse and he hasn't got a house,
I don't know why his name is Gerald.

He's getting pretty old, but he's a good mouse.
 
2012-11-05 02:37:32 PM  
So proud of my town right now...

/all grown up now
//made it onto the fark
///never move outside the perimeter
 
2012-11-05 02:38:37 PM  

ijason


next comes the tricky part... and somebody here already mentioned it: an inspection does not give you automatic recourse if something goes wrong. what it gives you is information. and information is only useful if you USE IT. go through the report, read it. ALL of it. read it again. all that information is only useful to you if you let it inform you in your purchase decision.... and it's useful to leverage price negotiation. it does not give you "get out of house free card", because as it has been said, if the inspector misses something, tough luck.


You're half-right.

Pre-purchase --> inspection issue can allow the potential buyer to walk away freely and any deposit would be returned
Post-purchase --> purchaser = SOL
 
2012-11-05 02:40:43 PM  

kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.


This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.
 
2012-11-05 02:41:15 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: ijason

next comes the tricky part... and somebody here already mentioned it: an inspection does not give you automatic recourse if something goes wrong. what it gives you is information. and information is only useful if you USE IT. go through the report, read it. ALL of it. read it again. all that information is only useful to you if you let it inform you in your purchase decision.... and it's useful to leverage price negotiation. it does not give you "get out of house free card", because as it has been said, if the inspector misses something, tough luck.


You're half-right.

Pre-purchase --> inspection issue can allow the potential buyer to walk away freely and any deposit would be returned
Post-purchase --> purchaser = SOL


Either way it gives you a great list of stuff to work on in the first 6 months aside from vanity upgrades.
 
2012-11-05 02:41:34 PM  

Round Fish on Toast: JackieRabbit: kvinesknows: JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)

in what country/province/state??

The United States for any mortgage product backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. This includes most standard, not-jumbo mortgages, though certainly not all.

Not true. Fannie/Freddy only require NPMA33, sometimes a 5 year roof certification. but only a fool would waive inspection.

Only hire an inspector with E&O insurance, never use someone recommended by a realtor. ask your lawyer for recommendations.


Friend, I just went through this two years ago. Believe me, you must now have an inspection to get a mortgage and the form I had to sign authorizing it and paying for it was a Freddie Mac form. In my state, you may no longer choose you own inspector, as I always have. Now, the bank must assign the inspector. This is because people were hiring fly-by-nighters to inflate values and ignore deficiencies that would disqualify the property for a mortgage.
 
2012-11-05 02:41:40 PM  
When purchasing a home, it pays to look inside the house too.
 
2012-11-05 02:43:07 PM  

JackieRabbit: Round Fish on Toast: JackieRabbit: kvinesknows: JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)

in what country/province/state??

The United States for any mortgage product backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. This includes most standard, not-jumbo mortgages, though certainly not all.

Not true. Fannie/Freddy only require NPMA33, sometimes a 5 year roof certification. but only a fool would waive inspection.

Only hire an inspector with E&O insurance, never use someone recommended by a realtor. ask your lawyer for recommendations.

Friend, I just went through this two years ago. Believe me, you must now have an inspection to get a mortgage and the form I had to sign authorizing it and paying for it was a Freddie Mac form. In my state, you may no longer choose you own inspector, as I always have. Now, the bank must assign the inspector. This is because people were hiring fly-by-nighters to inflate values and ignore deficiencies that would disqualify the property for a mortgage.


My state requires all inspectors to be licensed which happens by passing a certification test. So there's a bare minimum they know AND if they get complaints about their inspections, they lose that license.
 
2012-11-05 02:46:45 PM  

Girion47


Either way it gives you a great list of stuff to work on in the first 6 months aside from vanity upgrades.


Also that.
 
2012-11-05 02:49:08 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: So none of her "contractors, engineers and architects" noticed anything but she thinks the previous owner "had to have known"?


Well, of course they didn't - but if she was honest about it, the grounds for her groundless lawsuit would vanish..
 
2012-11-05 02:51:11 PM  

I_Can't_Believe_it's_not_Boutros: I know a mouse and he hasn't got a house,
I don't know why his name is Gerald.

He's getting pretty old, but he's a good mouse.


Shine on, you crazy diamond.
 
2012-11-05 02:52:47 PM  

Odd Bird: Summer Glau's Love Slave: /Just sayin'

Where have you been? There have been a couple of threads which had room for a Summer reference, I was left to carry the burden alone.

/just finished re-watching The SC Chronicles.
// Fake, but, well...NSFW
///SFW eye-candy
[www.fansshare.com image 440x368]


You are a God amongst insects.

/Thanks for the fake pic.
//Very fap worthy.
///I will INSPECT it at length.
////I just worked in "inspect" so the Mods won't gig me for being off topic.
 
2012-11-05 02:55:23 PM  

WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.


yeah.. if I felt like commuting I could sell my house that I paid 130ish for 6 years ago pay off my current mortgage and and purchase a house that has 400 more SQ feet and 9 acres south of the city and be free and clear of my entire mortgage.
 
2012-11-05 03:05:57 PM  

kvinesknows: WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.

yeah.. if I felt like commuting I could sell my house that I paid 130ish for 6 years ago pay off my current mortgage and and purchase a house that has 400 more SQ feet and 9 acres south of the city and be free and clear of my entire mortgage.


And all you have to do is give up the protection of the Floodway...
 
2012-11-05 03:09:05 PM  

sniderman: Morrius: It looks like they're testing missiles on that house.


/too obscure?

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 480x360]



Funniest part of that movie. I could watch that scene over and over and over.
 
2012-11-05 03:14:41 PM  

WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.

yeah.. if I felt like commuting I could sell my house that I paid 130ish for 6 years ago pay off my current mortgage and and purchase a house that has 400 more SQ feet and 9 acres south of the city and be free and clear of my entire mortgage.

And all you have to do is give up the protection of the Floodway...


snicker... yeah..... I googled the "flood maps" and well.... the house has been surrounded a couple of times.. still dry.. but completely surrounded
 
2012-11-05 03:17:55 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Prank Call of Cthulhu: her unfortunately-racist-named cat

My google-fu is weak. What is said cat's unfortunate name?


It would be something like "attractive and successful Feline-American" after going through the Fark filter. (Link)
 
2012-11-05 03:23:58 PM  

JackieRabbit: Round Fish on Toast: JackieRabbit: kvinesknows: JackieRabbit: Both of the banks I have mortgages with required a thorough inspection (it's actually the law)

in what country/province/state??

The United States for any mortgage product backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. This includes most standard, not-jumbo mortgages, though certainly not all.

Not true. Fannie/Freddy only require NPMA33, sometimes a 5 year roof certification. but only a fool would waive inspection.

Only hire an inspector with E&O insurance, never use someone recommended by a realtor. ask your lawyer for recommendations.

Friend, I just went through this two years ago. Believe me, you must now have an inspection to get a mortgage and the form I had to sign authorizing it and paying for it was a Freddie Mac form. In my state, you may no longer choose you own inspector, as I always have. Now, the bank must assign the inspector. This is because people were hiring fly-by-nighters to inflate values and ignore deficiencies that would disqualify the property for a mortgage.


inspection =/= appraisal
 
2012-11-05 03:30:27 PM  
Currently buying a house right now. And yes the home inspection is worth it as it does give you some leverage with getting them fixed or getting concessions since the issues are documented. The selling real estate agent/seller tried to get us to use a home inspector because he wasn't a real nit picker. I knew right away I didn't want to go with this guy. So I looked up some house inspectors in the area called a couple to talk to them and found one I liked. Once I got it scheduled we call to let the seller that we don't want you at the home during the home inspection and she was all pissy about that. Well for one thing the guy wants to look at the entire house without you trying to influence what he looks at. So by the end of it there were several issues with the house that we wanted fix prior to closing. And within the day she said they got all that fixed. Which we didn't believe so we asked for receipts which they couldn't produce. I also have to give then some benefit of the doubt since our real estate agent (dumb) didn't even forward the home inspection which I was referring to in my letter to have issues fixed. Once that got sent it got fixed but not without a bunch of biatching about how much it costs and yada yada.

Also appraisal also came in low, not by a lot just 1500 and we told the lady that we weren't going to be paying above the appraisal price. She said that couldn't do that and we were willing to walk the deal since listing lied about the sq ft of the house as well. Our real estate asked her if she would pay approve appraised value and she said no why would I do that and our real estate agent told her to think about that for a second. Once she found out that we would walk away if they said no, since we were tired of dealing with her shiat. Also complaining about having to fix stuff that would have been fixed for any other buyer that got a home inspection before.

Ugh buying a house from a biatchy real estate agent when your real estate agent is in her 70s is just retarded (did not pick her got relocated and the relocation company picked her).
 
2012-11-05 03:35:55 PM  
How the fark could you not SMELL that many mice? My God, they absolutely reek. I trust she walked through the house at least once before buying it...
 
2012-11-05 03:43:57 PM  

Iceboxxx: Currently buying a house right now. And yes the home inspection is worth it as it does give you some leverage with getting them fixed or getting concessions since the issues are documented. The selling real estate agent/seller tried to get us to use a home inspector because he wasn't a real nit picker. I knew right away I didn't want to go with this guy. So I looked up some house inspectors in the area called a couple to talk to them and found one I liked. Once I got it scheduled we call to let the seller that we don't want you at the home during the home inspection and she was all pissy about that. Well for one thing the guy wants to look at the entire house without you trying to influence what he looks at. So by the end of it there were several issues with the house that we wanted fix prior to closing. And within the day she said they got all that fixed. Which we didn't believe so we asked for receipts which they couldn't produce. I also have to give then some benefit of the doubt since our real estate agent (dumb) didn't even forward the home inspection which I was referring to in my letter to have issues fixed. Once that got sent it got fixed but not without a bunch of biatching about how much it costs and yada yada.

Also appraisal also came in low, not by a lot just 1500 and we told the lady that we weren't going to be paying above the appraisal price. She said that couldn't do that and we were willing to walk the deal since listing lied about the sq ft of the house as well. Our real estate asked her if she would pay approve appraised value and she said no why would I do that and our real estate agent told her to think about that for a second. Once she found out that we would walk away if they said no, since we were tired of dealing with her shiat. Also complaining about having to fix stuff that would have been fixed for any other buyer that got a home inspection before.

Ugh buying a house from a biatchy real estate agent when your real estate ...


When we had our inspection done back in May, the Seller and her agent were there for it. Before the inspection occurred we were told that no one but the inspector, us the buyers, and our agent could be present since they are a private people. I responded that if I wanted my parents with me, they'd be there or I'd walk. It ended up being just us, the inspector, and my agent, but as a buyer, you aren't going to dictate terms to me.

The seller's agent also biatched to my agent that I was talking to my inspector as he did the inspection (I do safety, IH, and went to school for public health, and I know how to do my own inspections, so I was gauging the skill of the guy as we went along).

We actually did walk during the offer process a couple times, but they weren't willing to budge on price(had been on the market for 5 months without an adjustment) and they wanted to take the refrigerator.(which is really nice and I'm enjoying having it).

This family also wanted to move out AFTER closing...without a security deposit...or rent. When I balked at that I was told

"Well we don't do that kind of thing here in Kentucky(bullshiat I grew up here and I'm moving back, I know better) and we're offended that the buyer's don't trust us"
 
2012-11-05 03:45:22 PM  

DeathCipris: dywed88: DeathCipris: lifeboat: FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"

Hmm....apparently in Canada they don't have "caveat emptor" cuz once you are in the house, it belongs to you beneficiary of the home buying contract. Being a recent home buyer, there was a line of verbage in my house buying contract specifically dealing with this stuff. It went to the effect of anything in this house is your problem now. No one will help you and you have no recourse if something is really dorked up. Remember, you are still responsible for your mortgage.

I know in Ontario you are liable if you knowingly misled the purchaser (i.e. if the old owners knew about the mice, they are liable).
As for the home inspection, most of the time they are pretty terrible and generally end up bearing less responsibility than the previous owners. Yeah it is good because they will generally notice massive issues, but they aren't particularly good unless you have someone you know personally and trust (i.e. a family member or friend). These guys need to be licensed and held liable for what they miss.


Oh yea, if they tried to hide it from you on purpose then they can be held liable.
How so very true tho...my home inspector missed some many things; it was unbelievable. Some of this stuff was a serious WTF? Supposedly "tested" the AC, totally didn't cuz that damn compressor was busted and there is no way that thing shot out cool air. But eh, what are you gonna do...tis why I bought a home warranty. 
BTW, side note, but there was a possible new home buyer here...hope they are still reading this so...
BUY A HOME WARRANTY. IT IS A VERY VERY GOOD INVESTMENT AND IT ONLY TAKES ONE PROBLEM TO GET YOUR MONEY'S WORTH.


I just bought a 20-yr old home this summer that had a home warranty on it (American Home Shield). The warranty is complete crap. A total waste of money. I have another home to sell and I told my agent I will not spend a dime on an AHS warranty.

We weren't in our "new" home a week when I discovered at least 3 inches of standing water in the bottom of the furnace a/c. Rusty water shooting out a hole in the side of the return air duct. AHS sent teenage "technicians" on two different occasions who both did the exact same thing, clean out the condensate line. Despite my telling them I was afraid the water damage inside the unit was extensive, neither one actually opened up the unit to fully examine the a-coil and parts beneath. I finally got sick of messing with them and called a local company to check it out. Turns out, the whole thing was rusted out with pinholes in the heat exchanger that would have leaked carbon monoxide when the furnace was turned on.

AHS wouldn't compensate because their "technicians" didn't find the problem and nothing had actually "failed". I asked them if they would have preferred it if I'd turned on the furnace and gassed myself. Apparently, that would qualify as a system failure.

/they can EABOD
 
2012-11-05 03:56:55 PM  

hammettman: lifeboat: FTFA: "Now, she said she will likely have to sue the previous owner."

Unfarkingbelievable. "It's not my fault I'm so farking stupid and irresponsible!"

This is what turns the article from "ha ha, what a typical cheap rich bastard" to "ergh goddamnitsomuchthisiswhywecan'thavenicethings!!!" and yes, those are technical terms.


It's why you should pay for an inspection when you SELL a house too.
 
2012-11-05 04:02:25 PM  
'All you see is just feces and urine,' Carrie Forsythe says about new home

Sounds like a frat house.
i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-05 04:08:05 PM  

Morrius: It looks like they're testing missiles on that house.


/too obscure?


Two weeks.
 
2012-11-05 04:08:57 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


(1) Owner's title insurance. There will be a title insurance policy, but that is for the mortgage company. You want your own. ESPECIALLY if it is a foreclosure or a short sale.

(2) Pre-closing inspection(s), that will let you out of the contract, if it fails. You may want a specialist inspection for septic systems and wells, if it's not on a municipal system. Also if it has a swimming pool, you want a professional evaluation.

(3) If major systems are in a crawlspace or attic, think HARD about whether you are willing to do the checks and filters yourself, or else budget to have a professional do it. It may seem o.k. the first time, or first five times. Take it from me, after 20 years, it gets old (so do you).

(4) Check the flood maps, and re-check. If the flood maps are old, what development has taken place upstream in the last 5, 10, or 20 years? We have helped people after a 500-year flood. It's ugly.
 
2012-11-05 04:14:18 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.
 
2012-11-05 04:16:15 PM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: [www.fabcats.org image 431x287]
If only there were some sort of creature that preyed on mice... 

/Just sayin'


They should have put the symmetrically-marked kitten in the middle...
 
2012-11-05 04:19:40 PM  
Somebody shoulda smelled a rat ....
 
2012-11-05 04:21:49 PM  
We had a home inspection when we bought out house in Ohio. Turns out we had a roof leak, a plumbing leak, the air conditioning leaked, and the sewer line had so many roots growing in it when we drained the washer sewage backed up into the basement.

It was too bad so sad. I guess it could have been worse.
 
2012-11-05 04:22:47 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


Our Realtor Association publishes a booklet just for First Time Homebuyers that has lots of excellent advice. Ask a Realtor in your state if they have one. It will help get you started. One thing to keep in mind is that the older a home is, the less stringent the building codes were when it was constructed. Also, most everything in a house will last at least 10 years before they start to tear up. Dishwashers, hot water heaters and HVAC systems start crapping out 10-15 years from installation. Roofs around 20 years. Get a longer mortgage and pay it off early. There are inspectors now that use cameras that can see into the walls to see if there is a water leak or an electrical hotspot. They cost a little more, but not that much more. They might also see if the house has 10,000 mice in the walls.
 
2012-11-05 04:24:12 PM  
keep telling us, we're to have fun. but take all our ice cream so we have none. this is more than a party.

cdn.songonlyrics.com
 
2012-11-05 04:26:06 PM  

sniderman: Morrius: It looks like they're testing missiles on that house.


/too obscure?

Brad
"Write me a cheque quick, before I come to my senses. Five grand."

Walter
"Five grand... Five thousand dollars?"

Brad
"That's just a deposit."

Walter
"I'm not tryin' to tell you your business, but you haven't even looked at my pipes. "

Brad
"I looked at them three years ago. You figure they've improved with age?"

 
2012-11-05 04:40:22 PM  
Not to kick anyone while they're down but, I'D HIT IT!

media.winnipegfreepress.com
 
2012-11-05 04:42:54 PM  

sniderman: Morrius: It looks like they're testing missiles on that house.


/too obscure?

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 480x360]


Ha. I mildly enjoyed that movie.
 
2012-11-05 04:58:19 PM  

Mikeyworld: Yeah,rent...You're gonna pay for shelter the rest of your LIFE. Ya might as well get money in return. Rent is throwing your bucks down a black hole: You pay, the money goes, you live in a shelter for another month. If you own (Ha! The bank will own it longer than you ever will), there's a return on it. Your equity goes up and you'll have a back-up savings. a re-fi after ten years, when you've settled into a steady income, can be used to shorten the loan, or lengthen it to get more money monthly. Unless you're planning on moving about the country, ownership is a better deal financially


There are few problems with that.
1) The value of a home may not necessarily go up. It can even go down.
2) The cost of ownership (maintenance, taxes, interest on any loan) can be comparable or even greater than the cost to rent
3) Leases are generally easier to get out of than ownership. Around here, after a year on lease you can usually go month to month, meaning you can leave within a period of two months and nothing can stop you and you have no disposal costs. When selling your home you have considerable disposal costs (commissions, legal fees, etc) and it depends on their being a buyer and you have less control over the closing date (must work with the purchaser).

There are advantages to both renting and owning and it varies on a case by case basis.

AcneVulgaris: Canada is facing an epic housing crash. They're where the US was in 2007.

Canadians will deny this. In a year, when it happens, they will deny denying this.


And it isn't like I heard that line regularly since 2008 (when there was a steep drop in property values). But yes, properties are overvalued in many markets. The thing is, due to government regulations and bank practices, such a drop will have far less impact in Canada than the US. Fewer mortgages will be underwater and there will be less foreclosures. Canadians have significant debt issues, though it is about more than mortgages.
 
2012-11-05 04:58:26 PM  
I r a real estate agent...

The inspector I recommend gives the buyers two reports, one is 20-30 pages with pictures and explanations and the other is a 5-10 page summary with pictures and notes for specific problems with the home. I tell buyers to use the summary as their "weekend project list"

Random thoughts:

Always look up and look down at the corners of the ceilings and walls if there are structural issues that is where you will often see them first.

Always look under the kitchen sink for moisture and leaking problems. If the sink does not have a disposal there may be issues with clogged pipes down the road.

Look at furnaces and water heaters for stickers or cards from companies that have done maintenance on them and see how many years it has been since they were maintained.

Look at how deck boards were fastened to the beams, if the boards were nailed down it is probably an older deck. If they were screwed down they are probably newer.

If you are looking at a bank owned home look on the signs that say "this home has been winterized" for the date it was winterized so you can guess whether or not the home sat empty over the winter. Write down the name and number of the company that did the winterization so you can get the same company to unwinterize it.

As you look around an older home and think about all of the changes you can make to the home think about what would be a $50 Project, a $500 project or a $5,000 project and try to limit the $500 and $5,000 projects that you have to budget for.

If you plan on making a lot of changes other than paint and replacing bad flooring wait for about six months after you have owned the home and if whatever you wanted to change still bothers you then make the change, otherwise you have gotten used to it and can save the money by leaving it alone.

If you are looking at an older house notice how tall the opening for the refrigerator is. The started making them a few inches taller 20 years ago or so and some older houses have openings that are too short.

In older home if you look between the panes of a double pane window you can often see the manufacture date of the window and then guess how old they are.

Always look in the electrical panel to see how old the panel is and if there are extra breakers to add a shop or hot tub onto the panel.

Avoid variables you can't control, like HOA fees, high taxes, loud businesses next door.

For those chasing the "North Idaho Dream" of five acres with a house and shop in the woods:

Think about how far you want to be from a loaf of bread, what kind of internet access is available, who will plow the roads in the winter, etc.

Look a map and figure out how far the property is from the nearest lake or river and how far it is from government forest land for using ATV's, hunting etc. About 70% of all of the land in Idaho is owned by the government in one for or another, get out an enjoy it.

When you are driving out on the back roads looking at properties look for mail boxes because then you know at least one person drives that road in the winter.

Look for school bus stops because they have a higher priority for plowing in the winter.
 
2012-11-05 05:09:50 PM  
www.cbc.ca

This was $1M in Winnipeg? Srsly?
 
2012-11-05 05:13:05 PM  

ElFugawz: [www.cbc.ca image 300x170]

This was $1M in Winnipeg? Srsly?


Plus the mice.
 
2012-11-05 05:14:03 PM  
She needed a pest inspection, not a home imspection. I'm guessing that she did not get a loan from the bank to pay for this because if she did she would have been required to get both a home inpspection and a pest inpection, at least that is the way it works in most of the US. Hell, if she is rich enough to buy the house than she is rich enough to pay to fix it up.
 
2012-11-05 05:25:32 PM  
Well, when you only pay $1m, you're going to get a rat infested shed.

/Californian.
 
2012-11-05 05:26:51 PM  
Random thoughts:

I can't imagine the homeowner never hearing anything suspect, especially if the buildup had taken years. I've been through rodent problems that are trifling by comparison, and we could darned well hear *something* before we could see/smell any evidence.

I can't imagine how a competent inspector--If Hired--wouldn't have noticed something. Then again, owner waived this dumbly.

Gonna be an interesting court battle. If seller can keep a straight face and say "never heard or saw a thing," then they probably win, I suppose.


That said, you're at the mercy of the inspector--though some firms sell "Home Warranties" that perhaps would deal with these....?


INSPECTOR'S JOURNAL ONLINE FORUM--recent chat re mice infestations:

http://www.inspectorsjournal.com/forum/topic.asp?topic_id=16552
 
2012-11-05 05:51:04 PM  

ElFugawz: [www.cbc.ca image 300x170]

This was $1M in Winnipeg? Srsly?


5000 sq ft house that may have a fair chunk of land attached to it.
 
2012-11-05 06:31:19 PM  

kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.


in my opinion, if you have a realtor you trust and someone at the bank who is committed to you things will be a lot easier. Also, I think we really underestimated the need for closet space. Also, when you set your budget (and really put some thought into it!) make sure that everyone knows it is firm (especially your realtor) because when you look at houses the most expensive one will always be the one you want. So it better be in your budget.

We did all the walk throughs with our inspector plus had a home builder/contractor friend walk through it with us as well.

I also would not waste a lot of time on 'for sale by owner'. All the people I know who are selling their house themselves:

a) don't fix anything that is wrong with their home
b) are asking way too much
c) make it horribly inconvenient for you to see their home
 
2012-11-05 06:55:14 PM  
kinda sucks but the insulation is just the pink stuff and upgrading to the blown in foam will lower her heat bills significantly, silver lining...
 
2012-11-05 07:40:03 PM  
We bought our first home a few months ago, and my wife's father did the inspection. He's been a contractor for about 30 years, so he knows what to look for.

To my knowledge, a home inspection isn't mandatory in my part of Canada. But the mortgage company did require us to get a professional appraisal done on the place. (They want to be sure the house is worth at least the amount they're lending us, after all)

Also, private sales are they way to go. All you really need is a good mortgage broker and a lawyer. And you'd have to deal with those folks anyway, so why should a realtor get several thousand for essentially making a classified ad listing on MLS? Screw those parasites.
 
2012-11-05 07:59:34 PM  

spidermilk: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

in my opinion, if you have a realtor you trust and someone at the bank who is committed to you things will be a lot easier. Also, I think we really underestimated the need for closet space. Also, when you set your budget (and really put some thought into it!) make sure that everyone knows it is firm (especially your realtor) because when you look at houses the most expensive one will always be the one you want. So it better be in your budget.

We did all the walk throughs with our inspector plus had a home builder/contractor friend walk through it with us as well.

I also would not waste a lot of time on 'for sale by owner'. All the people I know who are selling their house themselves:

a) don't fix anything that is wrong with their home
b) are asking way too much
c) make it horribly inconvenient for you to see their home


You know, honestly, I'm a single guy, making a decent wage. I put cash in my 401k, I feed myself and pay my bills and have toys, and still put money into savings every month, but I don't run a budget at all. I've never needed to because I live so meagerly.

I think someone posted a calculator in-thread, but anyone recommend a budget for housing stuff?
 
2012-11-05 08:00:17 PM  
*ahem*

startswithabang.com
 
2012-11-05 08:06:44 PM  

WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.


must be Asian immigrants...if it were Mexican immigrants or African Americans migrating in your neighborhood your house would be worth $40K instead of $400K.
 
2012-11-05 08:11:22 PM  

MightyPez: Jesus. I am not a big earner by any stretch. When I was house shopping I was pinching pennies wherever I could, but I certainly didn't skip over the inspection of the place I planned to live in for a long time.


Exactly, fark this biatch
 
2012-11-05 08:22:09 PM  

Xcott: I knew some people who passed on the title insurance when buying a house.

For the uninitiated, "title insurance" insures that the house you're about to buy really belongs to the seller, without any gotchas like a neighbor having a legitimate claim to half your backyard. Since it "insures" against events in the past rather than in the future, you only make a one-time payment for it. It's a typical expense along with home inspection.

Passing on the insurance for whatever reason, my friends later found that the previous owner ran a business out of his house that went into bankruptcy, and some bank claimed it was theirs. I guess they're still living in it so they got the issue resolved, but Cheeee-rist people, pay for the damn insurance.


The average person loses money on all their insurance transactions.

It isn't THAT stupid to play the odds.
 
2012-11-05 08:24:00 PM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: Suddenly, MICE!
[img198.imageshack.us image 650x366]
Thousands of 'em.


yay! Sorry I love mice.
 
2012-11-05 08:52:57 PM  

Unobtanium:
Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.

You can hire me to review the contract before closing, if you wish. But at that point, you're already screwed or not; you're only paying me to find out earlier. An attorney is much more helpful before the contract is signed, to make sure you understand the terms and your responsibilities.
 
2012-11-05 09:54:11 PM  

kvinesknows: grokca: kvinesknows: GoldDude: Somebody's got to help me.
The seller must have known.
There's got to be SOME way that this isn't MY problem.

yah.. dont get that. article says she was in there several times with pros of various types... no one noticed.. so why should the owner notice>?

Because mice are noisy, there was no way the previous owners could not have known there were mice in the house, unless they were deaf.

and no way the original purchaser and her numerous experts she had through the place should not have noticed either.


Depends on what time of day it was, mice tend to be nocturnal. Inspections happen during the day.
 
2012-11-05 10:32:05 PM  

apiarist: Unobtanium:
Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.
You can hire me to review the contract before closing, if you wish. But at that point, you're already screwed or not; you're only paying me to find out earlier. An attorney is much more helpful before the contract is signed, to make sure you understand the terms and your responsibilities.


apiarist: Unobtanium:
Oh, yeah,
(5) strongly consider your own attorney for the closing, or at least to review the contract before closing.
You can hire me to review the contract before closing, if you wish. But at that point, you're already screwed or not; you're only paying me to find out earlier. An attorney is much more helpful before the contract is signed, to make sure you understand the terms and your responsibilities.


I suppose it depends on jurisdictions, but transfer of land can have a lot of strict rules and aren't as simple as regular transfers of property. You are often advised to get a lawyer to handle the closing to ensure it is done properly,
 
2012-11-05 11:17:20 PM  

kroonermanblack: spidermilk: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

in my opinion, if you have a realtor you trust and someone at the bank who is committed to you things will be a lot easier. Also, I think we really underestimated the need for closet space. Also, when you set your budget (and really put some thought into it!) make sure that everyone knows it is firm (especially your realtor) because when you look at houses the most expensive one will always be the one you want. So it better be in your budget.

We did all the walk throughs with our inspector plus had a home builder/contractor friend walk through it with us as well.

I also would not waste a lot of time on 'for sale by owner'. All the people I know who are selling their house themselves:

a) don't fix anything that is wrong with their home
b) are asking way too much
c) make it horribly inconvenient for you to see their home

You know, honestly, I'm a single guy, making a decent wage. I put cash in my 401k, I feed myself and pay my bills and have toys, and still put money into savings every month, but I don't run a budget at all. I've never needed to because I live so meagerly.

I think someone posted a calculator in-thread, but anyone recommend a budget for housing stuff?


Here's the standard breakdown* Link

*Not applicable in places like San Francisco and New York where rent is obscene.

I used something like that when I got my first job to figure out how much I should be paying in rent. Since then, I've found much more useful advice: if you're already in good shape and you're saving as much as you want, don't worry about the rest of it. To figure out if you are saving enough, you can find any number of retirement calculators on line, or, depending on your resources, you can hire a financial advisor to help you figure out what your future looks like 40 years down the line. And, as a bonus, they'll help you make more money. It sounds like a financial advisor is what you actually want. But since you mentioned a 401k, check with the provider. They may have some free or cheap advisors you can take advantage of.
 
2012-11-06 12:21:53 AM  
img198.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-06 01:38:52 AM  

Summer Glau's Love Slave: [www.fabcats.org image 431x287]
If only there were some sort of creature that preyed on mice...

/Just sayin'


I wouldn't want to let cats take care of the problem. I mean, having a cat before it becomes a problem helps. They'll take care of the odd one here and there and keep the population in check. However, once there's an infestation, all the urine and feces everywhere are just as dangerous to pets as they are to people.


Mikeyworld: kroonermanblack: Anyone have advice for a first time house shopper buyer? I'm considering buying something in my area. Personally I like small and bizarre and cheap. But I don't really have 300k to drop over 30 years, and would prefer a much shorter aggressive mortgage.

Get yer credit score. That'll have more of an effect on the cost than almost anything. And remember that this is a long-term deal. Make sure the basics are solid, ya know? The bathroom is near the bedrooms. There isn't a garage door in the living room. The kitchen has ALL the necessary plumbing. And get the inspections, as this article points out.


OMFGLOL!!! My uncle's house was like that! He owns a home building company, so he had his house custom built. There's an actual living room, but there was also an attached garage which they ended up using as a second living room/family room. I guess it was insulated, but it just had a concrete floor. They put down some rugs and had furniture, a TV and a hot tub. But eventually, they turned the garage door into an actual wall, built a detached garage and added onto the house.


spentshells: Wolfy: A million bucks for a house in Winnipeg...

/Palmface.jpg

HAHAHHA you are so right on the money here. What someone with 1 million dollar house budget does is buys a 300 dollar house in the peg and 700,00 cottage in kenora


Or Falcon Lake....But I think you meant 300 thousand dollar house and 700 thousand dollar cottage.


SuperNinjaToad: WinnipegDragon: kvinesknows: LemSkroob: One million? In Winterpeg? Dont most places there only cost $500 to begin with?

meh... winnipeg has an insane immigrant population growth right now and this drives house bidding wars of $20K or more over asking price bidding wars on houses that list at $150K and are were worth less then $70K 5 years ago.

This is so true. The bubble is pretty big right now and probably will pop at some point. Fortunately, lending laws here won't result in a huge recession like in the States.

My place was $149k 11 years ago, worth probably $400k now.

must be Asian immigrants...if it were Mexican immigrants or African Americans migrating in your neighborhood your house would be worth $40K instead of $400K.


Yup. It was stated in a recent newspaper article that the second most common language in the city is not even French, but Tagalog (Filipino).
 
2012-11-06 02:18:49 AM  

grokca: Depends on what time of day it was, mice tend to be nocturnal. Inspections happen during the day.


That's exactly why I have a hard time believing no one ever suspected anything that had potentially been going on for ~5 years.
Night time tends to be the quietest relatively so you would think someone would have heard something in all that time.
I knew I had a mouse about a month ago because I could hear it. That 1 mouse.
 
2012-11-06 07:43:45 AM  
mice to meet u

www.biography.com
 
2012-11-06 09:12:20 AM  

WalMartian: I just bought a 20-yr old home this summer that had a home warranty on it (American Home Shield). The warranty is complete crap. A total waste of money. I have another home to sell and I told my agent I will not spend a dime on an AHS warranty.


When the sink disposal started leaking all over the kitchen, we were relieved to have a warranty.

Then we found that we were constrained to their choice of service company, and has a $100 deductible. The service company claimed the 5-year-old unit had been incorrectly installed, since one of the bolts was now loose. Our claim was denied and we had to pay out of pocket, without the ability to shop around for a better price.

Complete scam. You're out the cost of the warranty PLUS the inflated prices of their "preferred" service provider, and you won't know if you're covered until they show up. Hint: If something fails early, it was improperly installed, and that's exactly what they don't cover.
 
2012-11-06 09:20:21 AM  

Representative of the unwashed masses: "Now I have a shell, which I love, and it will be clean. But someone's got to help me," Forsythe said.

No, no we don't...


ronewzakcleveland.files.wordpress.com
"Someone has to pay for all these kids!"

Maybe we should hook those two up and they could help each other.
/Probably not.
 
2012-11-06 02:46:35 PM  
The previous homeowner told CBC News he did not know anything about a mouse problem, adding that he would have never sold the house if he did.


You mean those stealthy critters were sneaking around you undetected, not eating a d*** thing in that house... FOR FIVE YEARS?!?!?!

Solid Mouse is the new Solid Snake.
 
2012-11-06 03:20:42 PM  
Home inspections are a joke.

"...there's some damage in the , recommmend having proffesional come out for further inspections...that'll be $500"
 
2012-11-06 04:34:11 PM  
That isn't the problem.
The issues are even when the inspectors misses something obvious, the inspector is only liable for up to the amount you paid him.

They need to be licensed and have standards that must be met or they bear the liability.
 
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