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(NASA)   New alert notifies you when you can see the ISS overhead. That reminds me, I wonder where my laser pointer is   (spotthestation.nasa.gov) divider line 26
    More: Cool, International Space Station, laser pointers, space stations, Johnson Space Center  
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1992 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Nov 2012 at 8:27 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-11-05 08:31:48 AM  
Better be one hell of a laser pointer.
 
2012-11-05 08:40:08 AM  
done and done.

Thanks, subby!
 
2012-11-05 08:40:30 AM  
Is it on google sky maps?
 
2012-11-05 09:13:33 AM  
 
2012-11-05 09:43:19 AM  
Or go here and enter your latitude and longitude and get a map telling you where in the sky it'll be. Even if you don't live in one of the cities in NASA's list. (Probably not worth looking unless the magnitude is negative - smaller numbers are brighter.)
 
2012-11-05 09:49:10 AM  
woot

/signed up
 
2012-11-05 10:00:57 AM  
Heavens Above is a better site, and also includes other satellites including daytime-visible Iridium flares.
 
2012-11-05 10:11:07 AM  

crab66: Better be one hell of a laser pointer.


http://www.wickedlasers.com/arctic
 
2012-11-05 10:11:28 AM  
Perhaps one of you Farkers out there can answer this for me......Has the ISS ever at any time been in geostationary orbit, perhaps back about the turn of the millenium? I remember there being a stationary object (not a streetlight) visible in the low southeastern sky from Glasgow, Scotland for several months. I always assumed it to be the ISS.

I'm not saying its aliens, but....
 
2012-11-05 10:19:52 AM  

Soup_In_A_Basket: Has the ISS ever at any time been in geostationary orbit


Nah. Geostationary orbit is at an altitude of 22,236 miles. The ISS is in low earth orbit, at about 225 miles. It's a lonnnnnnnnnng way from geostationary.
 
2012-11-05 10:21:43 AM  
Here's a graphic for context. The ISS is in the blue zone at the left. Geostationary is that line where it goes from green to red.
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-11-05 10:32:39 AM  
Theaetetus - Thanks. Cool chart!
 
2012-11-05 10:42:38 AM  

Soup_In_A_Basket: Theaetetus - Thanks. Cool chart!


Not mine, from Wiki. But here's the full size, readable version.
 
2012-11-05 10:44:52 AM  
Came to plug Heavens-Above and am happy to see that it was already done twice.
 
2012-11-05 11:13:40 AM  

Theaetetus: Soup_In_A_Basket: Theaetetus - Thanks. Cool chart!

Not mine, from Wiki. But here's the full size, readable version.


Wow, I learned something today. Thank you so much! That was very cool!
 
2012-11-05 11:22:08 AM  

Theaetetus: Soup_In_A_Basket: Has the ISS ever at any time been in geostationary orbit

Nah. Geostationary orbit is at an altitude of 22,236 miles. The ISS is in low earth orbit, at about 225 miles. It's a lonnnnnnnnnng way from geostationary.


It's a long way to go.
It's a long way to Geostationary
to the sweetest orbit I know
Goodbye, current orbit,
Farewell L-E-O
It's a long long way to Geostationary,
But my heart's right there.
 
2012-11-05 11:44:53 AM  
If you have an Android device, Satellite AR is a very nice app for spotting various satellites.

It has a setting specifically for the ISS, it'll tell you how long it is until the next flyover, and when one is iminent, it gives you an AR view similar to Google SkyMap with a projected track where the ISS will fly.

I usually use Heavens above to give me a list of approx times of when its going to pass over, and then Satellite AR to pinpoint where it's coming from once I'm out there.


A shot of the ISS taken from my back garden in Apr 2011 (30 Second exposure) (it's big to embed).
(Shameless plug: there's a whole bunch of them on a blog myself and a couple of mates run)

http://www.twisst.nl/ is also a good service, it will tweet you when the ISS is going to flyover your location (as listed in your twitter profile)
 
2012-11-05 12:30:11 PM  
I prefer n2yo.com over Heavens Above. Seems to be similar to the rest but I am more familiar with it.
 
2012-11-05 12:53:40 PM  

Soup_In_A_Basket: Theaetetus - Thanks. Cool chart!


full size!
 
2012-11-05 01:23:10 PM  

rwfan: I prefer n2yo.com over Heavens Above. Seems to be similar to the rest but I am more familiar with it.


N2YO is a ham radio operator. It's appropriate, because not only do we have 29 operating ham radio satellites in space, there is also a ham radio station on board the ISS.
 
2012-11-05 01:23:28 PM  
On Android, I've always been a fan of ISS Detector. The one Pinko_Commie names is nice, too.

Unfortunately, at my latitude, it never gets more than a few degrees over the horizon, so I can only see it from the tall buildings we don't have.
 
2012-11-05 01:45:13 PM  

Radak: On Android, I've always been a fan of ISS Detector. The one Pinko_Commie names is nice, too.

Unfortunately, at my latitude, it never gets more than a few degrees over the horizon, so I can only see it from the tall buildings we don't have.


You could always try talking to them.
 
2012-11-05 01:58:46 PM  
Shining lasers at the ISS? Well, not lasers exactly, but It's been done.

Video
 
2012-11-05 06:05:33 PM  
Spaceweather has offered this for years haven't they?
 
2012-11-06 12:09:55 AM  
This might never see a green light, but this is why I figure TFark is worth it. Nice.
 
2012-11-06 08:28:08 AM  

Radak: On Android, I've always been a fan of ISS Detector. The one Pinko_Commie names is nice, too.

Unfortunately, at my latitude, it never gets more than a few degrees over the horizon, so I can only see it from the tall buildings we don't have.


That's quite a nice one. Satellite AR is good for showing you the track, but it always annoyed me that you couldn't set an alarm on it.
 
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