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(The Sun)   Study: 78% of parents won't let their snowflakes play outside   (thesun.co.uk) divider line 103
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9653 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Nov 2012 at 8:14 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-04 09:16:56 AM  

muzzrphochr: dittybopper: i52.tinypic.com

You were making a good point....till this pic. Packing a cannon may be a tad extreme.


He's *CLEANING* it.
 
2012-11-04 09:19:09 AM  
The irony is that roads have never been safer, despite there being a lot more cars. We have something like 2000 deaths on the road in the UK which is a quarter of what it was in 1970 (mostly because those cars also have far better brakes and tyres and are safer to be a passenger).

And if you're scared of pedophiles, here's a number: there were 72 successful child abductions by a stranger. Yes: SEVENTY TWO. If you're worried about that level of risk, you're a moron.

The problem here is that people aren't balancing risk and benefit.

/ my kids were playing out in the street at the age of 7.
 
2012-11-04 09:21:09 AM  

Lunaville: I understand giving into the peer pressure to keep your kids on lock down at all times. I periodically make my kids go outside. I have neighbors come over and report that my children were riding their bikes in the road. Yes, well circling the front lawn gets awfully boring. On another occasion, a neighbor dropped by because he thought I should know my kids were playing in the narrow strip of woods behind our house. He looked perfectly horrified when I said "Yeah, I gave them a choice between going out to play or scrubbing the toilet."

I haven't done that in a while and it's time for me to get back on my toes. Yesterday, my kids spent about 10 hours on electronic devices. One spent the entire day playing a single video game. We all love our computerized activities, but geesh, that's not healthy.


My boys are out in the woods all day (behind our subdivision). Had a neighbor comain because they were trapping or shooting rabbits. My answer was, "I know. They cook them and eat them. " Same lady was concerned when she saw the boys playing football in the greenway without helmets. I told her not to watch anymore and it wouldn't bother her. Bet her kids are a ton of fun but nobody ever sees them outside. They get off the school bus and go in the house....sad.
 
2012-11-04 09:26:15 AM  

NutWrench: "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics." - Mark Twain


Disraeli sed it first.
 
2012-11-04 09:29:17 AM  

bborchar: Lunaville: bborchar: Uh, no, I'm not going to let my under-10 year old children play in the street. Especially considering our road is a high traffic road. In our yard, though? Of course. At the playground? Definitely. Let them on a computer? Not yet. Not sure how "playing outside" got equated to "playing in the street". I would hope that no parents were letting their kids play in the street.

Because cyclists have no right to use the road? Most kids get their first bike at around age six. The road is where most people ride their bikes. I'm certain that's where you rode yours and still do if you own a bike.
You're why I went to my doctor when my kids received their first bicycles and said "Help, I need a Valium prescription." Wisely, he said "No."
Yes, I know you're going to argue that things are different now than when you were a kid and that's why todays' children shouldn't be allowed to ride their bikes in the street. And you're right things are different. A lot more people are a$$holes about kids now.

My kids are 3 and 1 :p And I live on a main street. Not all roads are safe for bicyclists, mine included. Now, when the weather is nice, we walk to the library, park or preschool. And when my daughter is old enough, she'll walk to school because it's very close. But I will take my daughter and son to ride their bikes down the trail that goes all through the city and down into the country for miles instead of in the middle of a street where no one obeys the traffic laws. We even closed the street down for our block party (we do it one day each year), and that still didn't stop some idiot from going around the barrier and almost hitting the group of kids playing in the road.


I'm so sorry, truly. That does sound like a nightmare. I'd have a complete nervous breakdown if I had to deal with drivers circumventing barriers to drive through a block party.
 
2012-11-04 09:29:53 AM  

Lunaville: ninotchka: Lunaville: I understand giving into the peer pressure to keep your kids on lock down at all times. I periodically make my kids go outside. I have neighbors come over and report that my children were riding their bikes in the road. Yes, well circling the front lawn gets awfully boring. On another occasion, a neighbor dropped by because he thought I should know my kids were playing in the narrow strip of woods behind our house. He looked perfectly horrified when I said "Yeah, I gave them a choice between going out to play or scrubbing the toilet."

I haven't done that in a while and it's time for me to get back on my toes. Yesterday, my kids spent about 10 hours on electronic devices. One spent the entire day playing a single video game. We all love our computerized activities, but geesh, that's not healthy.

Do you live in my neighborhood? People are ridiculous here. Most of them either have no kids or have one precious snowflake

I've found people with no kids at all are nearly always parenting experts.


Well of course we are. When you have kids your brain gets clouded by all those chemicals that MAKE you love the little shiat no matter what. Those of us without kids don't have this problem.

It would be downright selfish of us not share what our unaltered brains can see so clearly. It's kind of a civic duty, and you're welcome.
 
2012-11-04 09:31:27 AM  

tudorgurl: Lunaville: I understand giving into the peer pressure to keep your kids on lock down at all times. I periodically make my kids go outside. I have neighbors come over and report that my children were riding their bikes in the road. Yes, well circling the front lawn gets awfully boring. On another occasion, a neighbor dropped by because he thought I should know my kids were playing in the narrow strip of woods behind our house. He looked perfectly horrified when I said "Yeah, I gave them a choice between going out to play or scrubbing the toilet."

I haven't done that in a while and it's time for me to get back on my toes. Yesterday, my kids spent about 10 hours on electronic devices. One spent the entire day playing a single video game. We all love our computerized activities, but geesh, that's not healthy.

This. My 3 yr old plays outside with parental supervision. There are several.older kids (5-8 yrs old) who play with him. He loves being outside, and by god we're going to nurture that.

Too many of my students are on devices constantly. Many of them have never really been allowed to be kids and explore because they have helicopter parents. The kids and parents both are outrageously obnoxious.

My son will be covered in dirt as much as possible. I want him to have the same freedom in childhood as i did.


You sound awesome. I wish your family lived in my neighborhood.
 
2012-11-04 09:31:45 AM  
When I was a wee lad my Mum regularly urged me to "go play in the highway" as we lived quite close to Rt.23 in NJ. She was also keen on "selling me to the gypsies" which evidently were in short supply in our area.
 
2012-11-04 09:31:57 AM  
The world's too dangerous for kids to be allowed out of he womb.
 
2012-11-04 09:47:15 AM  
Our little guy is two. We have a low-traffic, one-lane wooded road next to our house that we usually go for walks down, and he's learned, just from observation (because the traffic is indeed so low we usually walk in the middle of the road) that when he hears an approaching vehicle we all run to the side of the road. He takes this duty very seriously, to make sure we all get clear. He's so keen on this that he makes sure we get off the road for traffic we can hear a kilometer away, on a different road. Safety first!

Not all kids are dumb and unable to be trusted in the vicinity of pavement and motor vehicles to not get themselves killed.

He also can't stand to stay in the house past 9am. We don't even have to insist he goes out; he insists we go out. We're pretty lucky, I guess. =)
 
2012-11-04 09:56:18 AM  
We wouldn't have played
Damn, lay off the hysterics.

/not trolling
//not that old (early 30's)
///2 kids
 
2012-11-04 09:57:08 AM  
lol, guess I cannot use the (
 
2012-11-04 09:58:39 AM  
fail, sorry, I'll go back to cleaning.
 
2012-11-04 09:58:42 AM  
When I was around 10 years old, the only rule I had to follow was to be home by dark.

I already knew to watch out for cars while playing in the street. That's why when the neighborhood kids played baseball in the street with me, we would regularly yell "CAR!" and all dash to the side of the road.

I wandered for miles around my house. It was awesome, and absolutely nothing bad ever happened to me.
 
2012-11-04 10:02:44 AM  
My daughter (who is now pregnant with her first child) recently remarked that we never just sat around the house while she was growing up. She said we were always going outside somewhere to have fun. I had never really thought about it. Same way I was raised, although as a boy, I was not usually accompanied by an adult. Just dogs and other boys.

/minor miracle that I survived to reproduce, but those were good times!
 
2012-11-04 10:08:46 AM  
I let my kids go out wandering the neighborhood after dark. The only think I insisted was that they take the dog.
When my oldest was 15 she complained that the dog wouldn't let her boyfriend come within 6 feet of her. Good Dog!
 
2012-11-04 10:09:41 AM  
Hmmm I wonder why kids are so fat these days?
 
2012-11-04 10:11:18 AM  

Lunaville: Hobodeluxe: I grew up outside.
born in 1960
raised in Georgia
we had a creek about 100yds from the house so there was plenty of swimming and fishing.
rode dirt bikes and played ball.
had a dog ,a bike,a skateboard and didn't have to be home until after dark.

way south: I remember when my parents wouldn't let me play inside.

ain't that the truth.

Hello, I also grew up in Georgia. My mother shoved us all outside right after breakfast or, when we were older, the second homework was completed. Then, she locked the doors and we stayed outside until dark. If I needed to use the restroom, I had to knock on the door. She would open the door wide enough for me to see one eye and say "What?" When I told her what I needed she'd say "Straight to the bathroom and right back outside! You're not spending the day slumped in front of the television." We would spend the whole day in the woods. As we got older and began to wander a bit further, we spent long hours in a local creek and found an empty lot that was perfect for mud-sledding in wet weather. We loved getting a running start, belly-flopping and zooming down hill through the twists and turns at that site. My mother, despite her love of outdoor play, did despise what the red clay did to our clothes when we went mud-sledding though.


Never saw any strange men arriving just after your father left?
 
2012-11-04 10:15:40 AM  
I think two things are happening. The first is the dissolution of community and neighborhoods. We live our lives much more isolated than we used to. Yes, I used to wander the neighborhood as a kid, but every person in a two mile radius knew who I was and I knew them. If I were up to trouble, my parents would know before I got home and if someone were to be bothering me, there'd be an adult there within seconds. Now, I'm embarrassed to say that I know very few of my neighbors and only a couple that I know well enough to trust with my children. They live very isolated existences as do I. My parents would meet up with neighbors for dinners, they would see them at church, they would see them at community activities. Now, I drive to church, I drive to community activities, I invite only my friends for dinner. Yes, this is my fault, but I don't think I'm the only one.

The other issue is the geographic dispersion of crime. Yes, crime rates have gone down, no doubt. The problem is though that the crime that is happening is no longer isolated to 'bad' neighborhoods. The southside of Chicago is a paradise now compared to during the crack epidemic of the 80s. The thing is though, Anytown, USA used to have zero crime and now it has a moderate level of crime as drug use has taken over the suburbs and rural areas. I moved to my town in 1996 and no lie, it was front page news for days when three cars in an overnight carpark had their windows broken and stereos stolen. Now, we have around one murder a month and muggings at least once a week. It's an area of about 100,000 people, so the rate isn't high, but it went from zero to noticeable and that has changed behaviour dramatically. When I first moved here, I'd wander the streets until the wee hours of the morning. Now, I'm inside after dark. I certainly wouldn't take my kids downtown after 8 or so and letting them wander there alone seems unthinkable.
 
2012-11-04 10:36:22 AM  

Uncle Tractor: A child that grows up without at least one trip to the doctor / hospital because of a play-related injury hasn't had a real childhood. Children are supposed to push those boundaries. Sometimes they get hurt as a result. It's a learning experience.

Too many of today's parents are a bunch of sissies and the damage they're doing to their kids is worse than a broken arm or skinned knee.


Bravo! - couldn't have said it better myself!
No wonder these kids are all fat pieces of shiat? They get no physical exercise and no human interaction. Qualifies as one of the worse forms of abuse in my mind.
 
2012-11-04 10:38:47 AM  

crab66: There are not many things I detest more than modern parents of young children.


Especially when they nearly outweigh a pod of whales!!
 
2012-11-04 10:42:57 AM  
In the old days people had kids, lots of kids. There were kids in every yard, hanging out of all the trees, riding bikes everywhere. So, if you lost a few here and there, not as big a deal. There was always a spare around.
 
2012-11-04 10:44:22 AM  

crab66: There are not many things I detest more than modern parents of young children.


I concur, we need more Cro-Mag parents in this world.
 
2012-11-04 11:04:15 AM  
Ah the sun... I kick my kids outside whenever I can.
 
2012-11-04 11:06:38 AM  

thurstonxhowell: Uhhh, kids under 10 shouldn't play in the street. Hell, unless you live on a quiet cul-de-sac, no one should play in the street. The street is for cars.


During big snow storms when I was a kid, the cul-de-sacs were where they would deposit a crap-ton of snow in a big pile. Oh the times we had sledding down those things :D (residential neighborhood, of course, so pretty much only local traffic). Also I remember seeing a lot of street hockey games and rollerblading, etc. You just picked up the goal and moved to the sides anytime a car came through, since the neighborhood was designed to make it easy to see them coming.
 
2012-11-04 11:26:10 AM  
Anyone surprised? Really?

Consider this: starting in the 1970's, child molesters hit the news -- that the actual originating incident itself was false took over a decade to emerge and by then, the media had fanned the flames into a roaring fire. By the 2000's. pervs wanting to snatch your kid were apparently behind every rock, weed and stick outside.

Then, the sun went from healthy and beneficial to a cancer causing, evil orb in the sky. Step outside for a minute without being slathered in layers of sun block and your kids would develop cancer as you watched. Again, the media made sure everyone knew about this fact -- again and again.

Just to make you feel more secure, you were informed of about 75 different ways all of that fresh air and greenery and dirt could nastily kill you. MERSA kinda comes to mind.

Around the 80's, everyone became litigious, suing everyone else for nearly everything. Meaning if your neighbors kid stupidly plowed face first into your house wall on your yard and broke his nose, well then, you had to pay medical expenses, pain and suffering, time lost by his parents from work and the future psychiatric treatments he'd need.

It was more cost effective to not let your kid have friends over.

Playing a game of Tag or Capture The Flag could have the SWAT team called out and the Division of Family Services would come and give you the Evil Eye.

Then, it was decided you couldn't smack your kid for discipline. Do so and go to jail. DFS would get involved -- again.

Go swimming at a beach or pond? 27 different forms of marine life were waiting to munch on your kid along with brain eating parasites, rip tides that would whisk him to France and 'Nasty Things' folks dropped in the sand.

Don't forget the drug dealers and gang mambers swarming around either wanting to recruit your kid, beat him up, shoot him or sell him brain burning things like bath salts.

In school, according to the media, every teacher wanted to have sex with him or her. Every teacher was a physically abusive, mentally tormenting, pain inducing sadist. Plus forced physical activity like gym class was now against his or her Rights.

Did I mention the bullies lining up on school grounds to torment your little darling? Apparently, they have lists of who to pick on which day and a schedule to keep.

There are now so many confusing, government backed regulations in schools that nearly anything your kid does or wears to express himself is going to get him in trouble. He had best not even think about touching a member of the opposite sex for any reason or he'll be branded a sex offender for life.

Stay away from public playgrounds with equipment on them. Everything there can injure or infect your kid and you'll just have to sue the city, the workers who maintain the stuff and even the companies who made it.

If you have a kid, you'll most certainly need a lawyer.

Don't tell them about the 'Birds and the Bee's'; you'll be a sex offender. Plus, there's Killer Bee's out there.

If you let your kid outside, make sure you have a first aid kit that would impress an Emergency Room. You'll need it for any scratch or cut can infect him and rot his arm off.

The Media assures you of that.

No playing in puddles either after rain storms. They're basically cesspools of bacteria and human fecal matter. No making paper boats or airplanes: a waste of resources.

If he climbs trees then he's a little psycho. He doesn't care how dangerous they are. Rush him to a shrink.

After all, folks much smarter and wiser than you have determined this.

/Glad I never had kids.
 
2012-11-04 11:29:36 AM  

way south: I remember when my parents wouldn't let me play inside.


THIS
 
2012-11-04 11:32:04 AM  
And that my friends....leads to THIS!

survivalfarm.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-04 11:47:28 AM  

Lunaville: I understand giving into the peer pressure to keep your kids on lock down at all times. I periodically make my kids go outside. I have neighbors come over and report that my children were riding their bikes in the road. Yes, well circling the front lawn gets awfully boring. On another occasion, a neighbor dropped by because he thought I should know my kids were playing in the narrow strip of woods behind our house. He looked perfectly horrified when I said "Yeah, I gave them a choice between going out to play or scrubbing the toilet."

I haven't done that in a while and it's time for me to get back on my toes. Yesterday, my kids spent about 10 hours on electronic devices. One spent the entire day playing a single video game. We all love our computerized activities, but geesh, that's not healthy.


senoy: I think two things are happening. The first is the dissolution of community and neighborhoods. We live our lives much more isolated than we used to. Yes, I used to wander the neighborhood as a kid, but every person in a two mile radius knew who I was and I knew them. If I were up to trouble, my parents would know before I got home and if someone were to be bothering me, there'd be an adult there within seconds. Now, I'm embarrassed to say that I know very few of my neighbors and only a couple that I know well enough to trust with my children. They live very isolated existences as do I. My parents would meet up with neighbors for dinners, they would see them at church, they would see them at community activities. Now, I drive to church, I drive to community activities, I invite only my friends for dinner. Yes, this is my fault, but I don't think I'm the only one.

The other issue is the geographic dispersion of crime. Yes, crime rates have gone down, no doubt. The problem is though that the crime that is happening is no longer isolated to 'bad' neighborhoods. The southside of Chicago is a paradise now compared to during the crack epidemic of the 80s. The thing is though, Anytown, USA used to have zero crime and now it has a moderate level of crime as drug use has taken over the suburbs and rural areas. I moved to my town in 1996 and no lie, it was front page news for days when three cars in an overnight carpark had their windows broken and stereos stolen. Now, we have around one murder a month and muggings at least once a week. It's an area of about 100,000 people, so the rate isn't high, but it went from zero to noticeable and that has changed behaviour dramatically. When I first moved here, I'd wander the streets until the wee hours of the morning. Now, I'm inside after dark. I certainly wouldn't take my kids downtown after 8 or so and letting them wander there alone seems unthinkable.


Dunno where you live, but you have more murders in your town of 100000 than I do in my city of 1.1 million. Time to move.
 
2012-11-04 12:13:48 PM  
One of the main problems is that there are now few actual places in which to play or roam. In my childhood there were wooded areas and vacant or semi-vacant lots, but those places no longer exist, especially in suburbia, because land costs too much to let it sit idle.
 
2012-11-04 12:18:13 PM  
This is exactly why I taught my kids weapons safety and use early

cdn.c.photoshelter.com

All mockery aside, don't teach children your own fears.
 
2012-11-04 12:55:15 PM  
Okay - I'm the odd ball out. That's fine. I grew up with parents who said, 'Go outside and play!'. My siblings and I were always running about. And it was a big mistake.

We lived in a moderately crappy part of town. Granted, there weren't drive-by shootings but there were some gang affiliations, drug using/selling, random violence and associated other crap. The kids that lived in our housing complex where mostly the kind of bad influences you didn't want your kids hanging out with. And us, sitting outside together, all the time, led to trouble. I mean, again, we weren't fearful of our lives or anything; but we did steer clear of the older kids and there were a few bullies our age that, depending on the day, would either try to kick our asses or joke about the last time they kicked our ass and hang out with us.

When we first moved in, I must have been in 3rd grade or so. The place scared the hell out of me. By the time high school rolled around, I thought it was normal. Spray painting things, hanging out with kids who were delivering drugs, smoking weed, shoplifting, fighting....it all seemed fine. Even the 'normal' stuff we did, seems pretty trashy now....we'd play soccer and baseball in the street and just yell 'car' as they approached. Nobody I know got hit by any cars - but I do know of times when we either broke a window/dented a house/car or someone got hurt far worse than they should have from the pavement/glass than a grass field.

I don't see how any of this helped me in life. My older brother fell in with the wrong crowd, did a lot of drugs, dropped out of school, and knocked up a chick who was still in high school; it certainly didn't help him.

When I have kids, for starters, I'll aim for a nicer neighborhood; but even still....I'd much rather pay the $200 or whatever it is to throw them on a sports team and let them socialize/exercise in a safer environment with adults around somewhere. Sure, they'll still have friends that they do stupid stuff with, but I don't think it'd be on the same level. Truth be told, with very, very rare exception, all of the trashiest kids I hung out with *couldn't* have afforded the price of any of those sports and, if they could, their parents (normally an unemployed single mom and absentee father), wouldn't.

I won't let them out of the house in the morning and let them run around until sundown. I don't see any merit in that model of parenting.
 
2012-11-04 01:08:23 PM  
Growing up in the 70s, I think I was typical in that I had free range from a very young age. I used to ride my bike or walk to many different neighborhoods to see friends or go to parks, libraries, etc. We were recently talking about this huge ditch we had to jump walking home from school - a couple mile walk, by the way. I've seen my old haunts, and you couldn't do what I did anymore because literally everything is gated off.

Now, we live in the country, and my two year old plays in the yard, the pasture, the creek, and on our long driveway while I do outside chores, if she isn't helping me. I don't know if I'd let her off the porch while I stayed inside just yet but that's more because of all the creatures in our healthy ecosystem who need to be respected than any concern about crime or skinned knees.

Even my teen knows I will only tolerate so much couch/screen time, though this is way more of a battle. Sigh.
 
2012-11-04 01:10:36 PM  

nirwana: crab66: There are not many things I detest more than modern parents of young children.

I concur, we need more Cro-Mag parents in this world.


Awww. Did I offend your snowflake parenting skills?


I'm so sorry.
 
2012-11-04 01:12:52 PM  
Any body that uses the word 'Mum' automatically makes me think of a pasty pansy tightie whitey wearing sperm slurper.
 
2012-11-04 01:22:25 PM  

crab66: nirwana: crab66: There are not many things I detest more than modern parents of young children.

I concur, we need more Cro-Mag parents in this world.

Awww. Did I offend your snowflake parenting skills?


I'm so sorry.


Parenting skills? you got the wrong guy here, sister. Nice try though.
 
2012-11-04 01:31:07 PM  
In London:

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-11-04 02:09:42 PM  
I don't understand the polling question. I also would not allow my children to play outside IN THE STREET.
 
2012-11-04 02:36:23 PM  
Seems like Britain has a lot of wimps and fear. When I was six I liked to take off and explore San Jose City, not the safest thing to do by far... Lots of kids roamed. I was sent off to Seattle when I was eight and we learned to play American Football on the paved street in front of our houses (no helmet/pads- HA! Take that.) And there were lots of forests to explore as well as a new city.

/I was never got the snowflake experience. Had the free-range child experience.
//You watched too much TV and you were locked out side the house.
///it was the '70s! In some ways it was actually more dangerous then.
 
2012-11-04 03:00:14 PM  
And let's not forget the 'sue everybody in sight' mentality now. My kids were playing with a plastic ball and bat set they got from Six Flags as a souvenir. The ball is a little smaller than a tennis ball and the bat is not even 20 inches. One hit and the wind catches it. It ends up in my gutter, so we get it down and tell the kids to play in the fenced in back yard. Next time, the wind catches it, over the fence it goes, and the neighbor starts carrying on about the damage to the landscape from a friggin' plastic ball and two little kids tromping over the grass to retrieve it. It was all we could do not to burst out laughing in her face. You could have picked it up and thrown it back, you old biddy.
 
2012-11-04 03:13:36 PM  

Huggermugger: One of the main problems is that there are now few actual places in which to play or roam. In my childhood there were wooded areas and vacant or semi-vacant lots, but those places no longer exist, especially in suburbia, because land costs too much to let it sit idle.


Yeah, and now everyone has a conniption fit kids are playing those places that do exist. A lot of parks are strictly closed at dusk... Cops show up in mass and taze and arrest playing kids with zero-tolerance policies (and yet do little with those people actually causing chaos and harm.) There are no random sandlots to play in any more.
 
2012-11-04 03:43:41 PM  
I grew up in the Bronx in the 1950's. We were out all day. Come home when hungry or dark. We moved to the country. Out all day. Came home when hungry.

Broke one arm any number of stitches. My son broke one arm, then an ankle some years later.

The reason you heal better when you are young is that you do these things.

My son says he won't have children because you can't bring them up the way you want to. It's no fun to be a kid today.
 
2012-11-04 03:58:37 PM  
Well, that article IS about Britain. Over there, it's probably illegal to allow your kids out of the house by now.
 
2012-11-04 05:02:48 PM  

KrispyKritter: She was also keen on "selling me to the gypsies" which evidently were in short supply in our area.


I keep threatening to do that to my own kids. Sadly, they are in short supply here, as well - and the kids have figured that out, too.
 
2012-11-04 05:07:01 PM  

Rik01: /Glad I never had kids.


Us too.
 
2012-11-04 06:53:46 PM  
I for one, hope more mothers allow their kids to play in traffic. Thank-you, The Sun, for shining light on this important issue.
 
2012-11-04 07:17:57 PM  
Oh look, this thread again...

Actually, since the last time this thread went green I have come up with another CSB.

As a teenager (13, 14?) I lived not far from a big river and during summer my friend Stephen and I would ride down to the boat ramp and look for two blokes putting a ski boat in the water. If we saw 2 blokes we'd wander up and ask if they needed a spotter. Often enough they'd say yes and we'd spend a day on the river watching the skiers for the driver. Then as the day wore on and the blokes got tired we'd suggest that perhaps we might get a turn on the skis (usually we'd get a yes to this too, a bit of a thanks for helping out). I was talking about this with my wife a few days ago and she looked at me and said "you know, today those men would get arrested". Sad really because not once did any of these strangers in ski boats do anything for me and my friend other than let us have a great day on the water.
 
2012-11-04 09:34:49 PM  
I was investigated by CPS for allowing my 9 yr old ride his bike to the park. Less than a mile away. With a cell phone. No crazy-busy streets to cross.
 
2012-11-04 11:26:49 PM  
Dude, it's Britain, what do you expect?

application.denofgeek.com
 
2012-11-04 11:30:05 PM  

KrispyKritter: When I was a wee lad my Mum regularly urged me to "go play in the highway" as we lived quite close to Rt.23 in NJ. She was also keen on "selling me to the gypsies" which evidently were in short supply in our area.


I did that with my kids. The gypsies part. They were even actively looking for them for me. Maybe that was a clue to my parenting skills.
 
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