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(Short List)   'Nerd' also nurd (nûrd), noun. Slang. Definition: simplistic and ridiculous person, dork. (From the Swedish Academy's dictionary). Well, not for long   (shortlist.com) divider line 18
    More: Cool, Swedish Academy, Swedish, nerds, nouns  
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2530 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Nov 2012 at 11:23 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-03 11:30:13 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
t.qkme.me
 
2012-11-03 11:38:54 AM
The moniker "nerd", like "geek", is a title that must be bestowed on you by society at large (e.g. by people who are clearly *not* nerds or geeks).

In other words, you can't call yourself a nerd/geek just because you like anime or play WOW.

And no real nerd would ever wear a shirt that says "nerd" or "talk nerdy to me" or any other such thing (real nerds don't advertise).

Sorry poseurs, but that's just the way it is. Find another sub-culture to co-opt.
 
2012-11-03 11:59:59 AM
I've never heard of someone who wasn't a nerd already with aspiring to be one the way some people regard some group's language, behavior, fashion, etc. as cool and imitate it.

We are talking "pride" issues here to make "nerd" non derogatory. It's analogous to "fat pride".
 
2012-11-03 12:18:07 PM
When I was younger (1990s in Illinois and Indiana) the essence of "nerd" was "smart, dorky outcast who rejected pretty much all culture and minimized contact with others." This would be contrasted with "geek," which was "smart, often dorky person fixated on a particular aspect of culture and sought out others similarly fixated to socialize with." So, for example, you had band geeks, drama geeks, gaming geeks, movie geeks, etc. The geeks often were hard for non-geeks to socialize with, often they were introverts by nature and could be as awkward as nerds in larger society.

Having been both a nerd and a geek, I can say that I identify far more with the Swedish definition than (for example) The Big Bang Theory's definition.

Of course I would also postulate that the true nerd is a dying breed. Why? Nerds were isolated socially by their priorities, which just didn't mesh with the priorities of those around them. Today, one can reach across the internet and find others of like mind to form imagined communities with.

For example, in the movie Grandma's Boy, Alex and the other testers are geeks. They hang out with each other, compete, and have their own social clique by their own choice. JP is a nerd, flouting his own supreme talents and rejecting the conventions and assistance of others while ensconsed in his isolated office. Despite his enormous skill and drive, he is very simplistic in nature. And while he is a character in a movie and it's damned hard to develop characters in the constraints of screenwriting, I have known many JPs who simply never were "discovered" and elevated beyond being self-absorbed higher-than-thou types (never met a holier-than-thou nerd, that would require acknowleging something greater than them).

I know others have said in other threads that the terms meant different things when they were growing up, but that was my experience in the Midwest.
 
2012-11-03 12:29:04 PM
http://nerdery.com/100nerds/
 
2012-11-03 12:30:27 PM

BolloxReader: When I was younger (1990s in Illinois and Indiana) the essence of "nerd" was "smart, dorky outcast who rejected pretty much all culture and minimized contact with others." This would be contrasted with "geek," which was "smart, often dorky person fixated on a particular aspect of culture and sought out others similarly fixated to socialize with." So, for example, you had band geeks, drama geeks, gaming geeks, movie geeks, etc. The geeks often were hard for non-geeks to socialize with, often they were introverts by nature and could be as awkward as nerds in larger society.

Having been both a nerd and a geek, I can say that I identify far more with the Swedish definition than (for example) The Big Bang Theory's definition.

Of course I would also postulate that the true nerd is a dying breed. Why? Nerds were isolated socially by their priorities, which just didn't mesh with the priorities of those around them. Today, one can reach across the internet and find others of like mind to form imagined communities with.

For example, in the movie Grandma's Boy, Alex and the other testers are geeks. They hang out with each other, compete, and have their own social clique by their own choice. JP is a nerd, flouting his own supreme talents and rejecting the conventions and assistance of others while ensconsed in his isolated office. Despite his enormous skill and drive, he is very simplistic in nature. And while he is a character in a movie and it's damned hard to develop characters in the constraints of screenwriting, I have known many JPs who simply never were "discovered" and elevated beyond being self-absorbed higher-than-thou types (never met a holier-than-thou nerd, that would require acknowleging something greater than them).

I know others have said in other threads that the terms meant different things when they were growing up, but that was my experience in the Midwest.


You people also say "pop" instead of "soda", so that explains why your opinion is radically wrong
 
2012-11-03 01:20:36 PM
You people also say "pop" instead of "soda", so that explains why your opinion is r .

You people? Expect to have the Juggalos track you down and douse you with red pop.
 
2012-11-03 02:09:34 PM
Goddamnit. Ogred in the Boobies. Well done on the quick pull of the trigger, Wasilla Hillbilly.
 
2012-11-03 02:38:01 PM
Awful translation from Swedish in TFA.

" 'simple-minded and laughable person' ("enkelspårig och löjeväckande person")"

Wrong.

"Maybe you are playing nerd, geek horse, language geek or nerd plug?"

Wrong, wrong, wrong.
 
2012-11-03 02:55:13 PM

neuroflare: BolloxReader: When I was younger (1990s in Illinois and Indiana) the essence of "nerd" was "smart, dorky outcast who rejected pretty much all culture and minimized contact with others." This would be contrasted with "geek," which was "smart, often dorky person fixated on a particular aspect of culture and sought out others similarly fixated to socialize with." So, for example, you had band geeks, drama geeks, gaming geeks, movie geeks, etc. The geeks often were hard for non-geeks to socialize with, often they were introverts by nature and could be as awkward as nerds in larger society.

Having been both a nerd and a geek, I can say that I identify far more with the Swedish definition than (for example) The Big Bang Theory's definition.

Of course I would also postulate that the true nerd is a dying breed. Why? Nerds were isolated socially by their priorities, which just didn't mesh with the priorities of those around them. Today, one can reach across the internet and find others of like mind to form imagined communities with.

For example, in the movie Grandma's Boy, Alex and the other testers are geeks. They hang out with each other, compete, and have their own social clique by their own choice. JP is a nerd, flouting his own supreme talents and rejecting the conventions and assistance of others while ensconsed in his isolated office. Despite his enormous skill and drive, he is very simplistic in nature. And while he is a character in a movie and it's damned hard to develop characters in the constraints of screenwriting, I have known many JPs who simply never were "discovered" and elevated beyond being self-absorbed higher-than-thou types (never met a holier-than-thou nerd, that would require acknowleging something greater than them).

I know others have said in other threads that the terms meant different things when they were growing up, but that was my experience in the Midwest.

You people also say "pop" instead of "soda", so that explains why your opinion is r ...


furthermore, a real nerd or geek would be way to nerdy or geeky to hang out on a hip site like Fark. it's just total fail for lonely poseur pop drinker boy. maybe it's not too late to be a cutter. hint hint.
 
2012-11-03 03:44:33 PM

Zmog: Awful translation from Swedish in TFA.


I can only imagine they used Google Translate and decided the words they got back needed no context.

At any rate, trying to make "nerd" a compliment misses the point. If you want to be a nerd, you take the negative connotation that goes with it. Otherwise, you're not a nerd. Just pitiful. And society has lots of names for you. In a wide array of languages.
 
2012-11-03 04:11:47 PM
 
2012-11-03 04:13:50 PM
The way I see it -

Dork - Socially inept. Lacks any particular defining characteristics. Unable to mesh with the population at large. Awkward sensibilities.

Nerd - Intelligent (often highly). Focused on knowledge and studies. Introverted (in the proper definition of the word). Rejects societal norms as they see no use for them. Socially stunted (often from lack of experience or desire).

Geek - Intelligent (often highly). Focused on hobbies and interests (often emphatically). Has no use for societal norms and instead chooses path of self fulfillment. Somewhat capable in social settings but only properly relates with like minded.
 
2012-11-03 04:27:33 PM
Get over it nords
 
2012-11-03 08:31:48 PM
How about:

Nerd - someone who can't help but shoves the things they like down other people's throats
 
2012-11-03 11:08:12 PM
nerd: someone who gives a shiat about dictionary definitions; dork.
 
2012-11-04 01:20:43 AM
Never Ending Radical Dude.
 
2012-11-04 09:41:06 PM
www.eldacur.com
 
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