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(Flickr)   First photos shared by the MTA of the flooded NYC subway tunnels   (flickr.com) divider line 46
    More: Followup, Water pumping, New York City Transit  
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15985 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Nov 2012 at 7:11 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-03 07:20:40 AM  
Any other source besides flickr? It's blocked here...and I'd kind of like to see them.
 
2012-11-03 07:26:05 AM  
well, there's your problem...
 
2012-11-03 07:29:19 AM  
image.spreadshirt.com
 
2012-11-03 07:29:21 AM  
I was watching some tv (ny1 online), and they were showing some of the damaged stations (pretty sure they were at south ferry), and the damage was just incredible, water more than 30 ft deep flooding stations, all of the electrical, all the fare boxes and turnstyles... just shot to shiat... and tons of wood/debris just piled up in the stations.
 
2012-11-03 07:30:42 AM  
99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.
http://www.thinkinghousewife.com/wp/2012/11/the-lumpenproletariat-of-n ew-york/
 
2012-11-03 07:31:52 AM  

brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City


More than 1% of Americans live in/around NYC, so you already got part of that wrong.
 
2012-11-03 07:32:19 AM  

brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.
http://www.thinkinghousewife.com/wp/2012/11/the-lumpenproletariat-of-n ew-york/


More than 2% of the country lives NYC, I get the feeling that they care. I also get the feeling that you're bad at math.
 
2012-11-03 07:34:35 AM  

davidphogan: brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City

More than 1% of Americans live in/around NYC, so you already got part of that wrong.


8 million in the city
22 million if you include the metro area

either way, a whole lot of people do care, but not batman apparently.
 
2012-11-03 07:36:00 AM  

davidphogan: More than 1% of Americans live in/around NYC, so you already got part of that wrong.


I'm a provincal living in deepest flyover country, and I care. I visit NYC as often as I can: 2-3 times per year. Can't wait to go back. Bounce back quickly, NYC.
 
2012-11-03 07:37:18 AM  

brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.
http://www.thinkinghousewife.com/wp/2012/11/the-lumpenproletariat-of-n ew-york/


Speaking of boils on America's butt, how bout arse clowns like yourself who take pot shots at people recovering from one of the worst natural disasters they've faced in their lifetimes.

Go home, the adults are talking here.
 
2012-11-03 07:38:19 AM  
I guess it took them a few days to pump all that water into the tunnels for their photo op.

#sandyneverhappened.org

brought to you by #dielyingjews.org in coordination with #manonthemoonmyass.net
 
2012-11-03 07:41:14 AM  
I live in Ohio, and even if though I have no interest in going to NYC, it's just simple humanity to "give a damn" about your fellow Americans.
 
2012-11-03 07:42:38 AM  
I wonder how many dead rats are going to show up when the water levels come down.

:(
 
2012-11-03 07:42:39 AM  

brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.


Congratulations, you've scored a 9.5 on the trolling scale.
 
2012-11-03 07:50:48 AM  

viscountalpha: I wonder how many dead rats are going to show up when the water levels come down.

:(


Why does that make you sad?
 
2012-11-03 07:53:25 AM  
You know what that first pic reminded me of? The start of the Pirates of the Caribbean attraction at DisneyWorld. Kinda heard "DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES" in my head as I was looking at it.

I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?
 
2012-11-03 08:00:33 AM  
I blame Bush
 
2012-11-03 08:11:07 AM  

blockhouse: I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?


It was an inside job. The government had intelligence that the city would flood but they did nothing. I bet they even turned on pumps in reverse to flood the tunnels faster. I bet there was even some thermite involved somehow. Alex Jones will go public with a big revelation soon. We want the truth!!

//sarcasm, but I'm sure it won't be long before we starting hearing shiat like this
 
2012-11-03 08:19:24 AM  

brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.
http://www.thinkinghousewife.com/wp/2012/11/the-lumpenproletariat-of-n ew-york/


100% of New Yorkers believe that America is LA and NY and a bunch of white trash in between.
 
2012-11-03 08:21:55 AM  

Lost_in_Oregon: brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.

Congratulations, you've scored a 9.5 on the trolling scale.


I'd give it a 5 at best.

I'm wondering how forever compromised those tuunnels may be. Where are the Fark engineers on this one?
 
2012-11-03 08:28:53 AM  

AbbeySomeone: Lost_in_Oregon: brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.

Congratulations, you've scored a 9.5 on the trolling scale.

I'd give it a 5 at best.

I'm wondering how forever compromised those tuunnels may be. Where are the Fark engineers on this one?


Probably calling each other names in a political thread...
 
2012-11-03 08:48:46 AM  
Using ruler to measure water depth...

I wonder how Queen Elizabeth got suckered into going into that murky water to measure the depth?
 
2012-11-03 09:10:54 AM  
I always heard that NYC was the world's business capital but I really think they are missing a big chance here. Leave the tunnels flooded, buy a bunch of gondolas, and charge rubes from fly over states $50 a head to enjoy the exotic new york love tunnel.
 
2012-11-03 09:14:34 AM  

spentmiles: I guess it took them a few days to pump all that water into the tunnels for their photo op.

#sandyneverhappened.org

brought to you by #dielyingjews.org in coordination with #manonthemoonmyass.net


There you are, I've not seen you lately. I was worried that the troll king had been taken out by a couple of elves or something.
 
2012-11-03 09:28:22 AM  

Cheron: I always heard that NYC was the world's business capital but I really think they are missing a big chance here. Leave the tunnels flooded, buy a bunch of gondolas, and charge rubes from fly over states $50 a head to enjoy the exotic new york love tunnel.


Better idea: build a canal for the gondolas along broadway near 42nd St -- let's not give the tourists a reason to leave Times Square.
 
2012-11-03 09:34:50 AM  
The lives of many many thousands of people have been turned upside down; whole neighbourhoods have flooded and/or burned down completely. It's going to be a long time before anything like "normal" returns for a whole lot of people. Kudos to all those rescue workers and regular folks who are busting their butts trying to get things dried out and cleaned up.
 
2012-11-03 09:35:53 AM  

firefly212: davidphogan: brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City

More than 1% of Americans live in/around NYC, so you already got part of that wrong.

8 million in the city
22 million if you include the metro area

either way, a whole lot of people do care, but not batman apparently.


Batman is part of the 1% #OccupyGotham
 
2012-11-03 09:37:18 AM  
I wonders if those plastic bags over cellars, helped.
 
2012-11-03 09:43:15 AM  

blockhouse: I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?


My guess is that some were, but the water also rose much higher than was anticipated. Also, the subway system is not designed to close, ever. Many stations don't even have gates or a way to keep people out, much less water. And considering there are 468 stations, and most stations have at least 4 entrances, and some many more, that's thousands of entrances that would need to be closed before even thinking about vents, sidewalk grates and everything else. I don't know exactly what was done, but I suspect that the amount of resources to seal everything off sufficiently either didn't exist, or couldn't be justified until something like this happened. Hopefully next time there will be new plans for an approaching storm.
 
2012-11-03 09:54:35 AM  

whenIsayGO: blockhouse: I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?

My guess is that some were, but the water also rose much higher than was anticipated. Also, the subway system is not designed to close, ever. Many stations don't even have gates or a way to keep people out, much less water. And considering there are 468 stations, and most stations have at least 4 entrances, and some many more, that's thousands of entrances that would need to be closed before even thinking about vents, sidewalk grates and everything else. I don't know exactly what was done, but I suspect that the amount of resources to seal everything off sufficiently either didn't exist, or couldn't be justified until something like this happened. Hopefully next time there will be new plans for an approaching storm.


468 stations in the whole system, sure. How many of those are below ground? How many of those were actually in the flooded areas? I doubt much water got in through the Times Square station.

Not diminishing your point about the number of possible access points for water, just saying, let's not overstate the problem.
 
2012-11-03 10:14:41 AM  

blockhouse: I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?


1. Virtually the entire subway system was built 100 years ago with out this kind of weather event anticipated. There's a limit to how much you can modify it without rebuilding it.

2. The MTA has been installing raised grates throughout the city since 2007:

media.ny1.com

3. This was literally a record storm surge -- the water levels had never gotten this high before. That's why they call it a once in a 100 years storm.
 
2012-11-03 10:15:23 AM  

viscountalpha: I wonder how many dead rats are going to show up when the water levels come down.

:(


Not very many.

Rats are smart enough to move to higher ground.
 
2012-11-03 10:32:04 AM  
It's a river of slime!
 
2012-11-03 10:42:27 AM  

Cheron: I always heard that NYC was the world's business capital but I really think they are missing a big chance here. Leave the tunnels flooded, buy a bunch of gondolas, and charge rubes from fly over states $50 a head to enjoy the exotic new york love tunnel.


No, the answer is hovercrafts. Lots of them. Not many eels in the East or Hudson Rivers.
 
2012-11-03 11:29:10 AM  
Never seen a pump train before. Saw the vacuum train at 4 am once.

I'm sure those nice folks over at Marcellus Shale would love to pay for any infrastructure improvements NYC needs and that would get them on board and invested in not destroying the city with poisoned frack juice in the reservoirs.
 
2012-11-03 11:38:21 AM  

blockhouse: You know what that first pic reminded me of? The start of the Pirates of the Caribbean attraction at DisneyWorld. Kinda heard "DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES" in my head as I was looking at it.

I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?


Allowed this to happen? WTF do you do to stop 400 Million gallons of water from flooding a hundred year old underground system. those inflatable plugs are totally unrealistic... also, sandbagging subway vents... that means covering miles of nyc sidewalks with sandbags... even if they took all the sand in the state, it probably wouldn't be enough. When you fight mother nature, you're gonna lose sometimes.
 
2012-11-03 11:41:13 AM  
To heck with flooded pics. The footage of a deserted Grand Central Station would make great stock footage for numerous films.
 
2012-11-03 11:49:11 AM  

brewswane: 99 percent of Americans dont care about anything that happens to New York City and consider it a boil on Americas butt.
http://www.thinkinghousewife.com/wp/2012/11/the-lumpenproletariat-of-n ew-york/


I basically felt the same way after 9/11. I visited Manhattan a couple of years later, though, and it turned out to be a pretty cool place. I remember walking past a sushi place that was open at 2:00 AM and the special on their sidewalk menu was horse dick.
 
2012-11-03 12:05:47 PM  
I'm impressed that the Bowling Green station is apparently open today. The South Ferry station looks like it's going to be a long time though. My office is across the street from both and we won't be getting back in there for another week at least.
 
2012-11-03 12:22:19 PM  

LesterB: I'm impressed that the Bowling Green station is apparently open today. The South Ferry station looks like it's going to be a long time though. My office is across the street from both and we won't be getting back in there for another week at least.


It's easily going to take months -- I wouldn't be surprised if it isn't until the spring. All the equipment has to be junked. They're probably going to have to rip out a lot of the walls because so much water got behind them. I'm sure most of the electrical in the station is fried. And because it's a termination point, I imagine it's a lower priority than other stations -- they can just run a free shuttle from Rector St indefinitely.
 
2012-11-03 01:24:52 PM  

ausfahrk: I basically felt the same way after 9/11. I visited Manhattan a couple of years later, though, and it turned out to be a pretty cool place. I remember walking past a sushi place that was open at 2:00 AM and the special on their sidewalk menu was horse dick.


I started watching the Times Square webcam for some reason--at first to see if the storm hit it--and it's pretty crazy. I saw a drug deal the other day, and then, right when the guy turned his head toward the camera, the live footage stopped for just a second.

I might not have really seen that--maybe it was just a blip in the broadcast, but that's exactly what it looked like. Definitely saw a drug deal though--right in front of the webcam.

This morning I was watching a young man trying to panhandle, but he really sucked at it, so he wandered off.
 
2012-11-03 02:46:42 PM  
Heh. So I'm not the only one rubber-necking the Times Square Webcam this week.

I had it running in the background all Sunday night and Mon, mostly because all the other webcams that would show the storm coming in were offline. It made me feel a bit closer to all the New Yorkers during the storm.
 
2012-11-03 03:22:16 PM  

Max Awesome: Heh. So I'm not the only one rubber-necking the Times Square Webcam this week.


I've been checking it at random since the storm. Did you know they play soccer at 1am local time in the middle of Times Square?
 
2012-11-03 05:37:09 PM  
Paging Doctor Freeman. Doctor Gordon Freeman, report to MTA Headquarters, please
 
2012-11-03 05:48:18 PM  

blockhouse: I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?



I don't think they anticipated a 13 foot storm surge.. I don't think anyone expect this storm to do the damage it did.. Well, I take that back.. The Weather Channel guys had it right.. Perfect in fact, but nobody wanted to believe them because of how bad they said Irene was going to be a year ago.. And it didn't pan out as bad as they expected..
 
2012-11-04 02:43:02 AM  

wxboy: whenIsayGO: blockhouse: I'm wondering how this was permitted to happen. NYTA knew that a large storm with a devastating, unprecedented storm surge was gunning for the city several days before it arrived. Why were the station entrances, ventilation shafts, etc not sandbagged?

My guess is that some were, but the water also rose much higher than was anticipated. Also, the subway system is not designed to close, ever. Many stations don't even have gates or a way to keep people out, much less water. And considering there are 468 stations, and most stations have at least 4 entrances, and some many more, that's thousands of entrances that would need to be closed before even thinking about vents, sidewalk grates and everything else. I don't know exactly what was done, but I suspect that the amount of resources to seal everything off sufficiently either didn't exist, or couldn't be justified until something like this happened. Hopefully next time there will be new plans for an approaching storm.

468 stations in the whole system, sure. How many of those are below ground? How many of those were actually in the flooded areas? I doubt much water got in through the Times Square station.

Not diminishing your point about the number of possible access points for water, just saying, let's not overstate the problem.


Well, 30 seconds on wikipedia would have told you: Out of the system's 468 stations, about 280 are underground and about 150 are elevated, the rest are in open cuts, at-grade and on embankments.. Not to mention that parts of NY and NJ that were ABOVE GROUND were destroyed and/or reclaimed by the ocean, the idea that there was anything even REMOTELY FEASABLE that would have prevented this (short of hermetically sealing 2/3 of the subway) is laughable. When a torrential downpour exceeding the capacity of pumps, plus an immense tidal flow hits you, you're not going to win. Physics is a biatch.
 
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