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(io9)   We are one step closer to nerve regeneration   (updates.io9.com) divider line 44
    More: Cool, axon, nerve regeneration, zygosity, scientific papers, Penn State University, paralysis, spinal cords  
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4505 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Nov 2012 at 8:09 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-02 07:21:45 PM
Good, because I'm probably going to need it in a few years.
 
2012-11-02 07:49:59 PM
images2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-11-02 07:53:47 PM
Nerve cancer sounds like it's going to suck.
 
2012-11-02 08:20:49 PM
FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.
 
2012-11-02 08:25:20 PM

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.


andthentheresthisguy.jpg
 
2012-11-02 08:45:21 PM

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.


Just look at AIDS treatment. It used to be that only the super-rich like Magic Johnson could afford the extensive costs associated with managing the disease. Now the medicine is becoming mainstream enough that they're able to defer some cost to treat the epidemic in Africa.
 
2012-11-02 08:46:25 PM
The nerve of those scientists!
 
2012-11-02 08:56:27 PM
Huh. I had my money on drinking pureed rat-brain olfactory bulb shakes for their glial cells.
 
2012-11-02 09:16:21 PM

Summoner101: Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.

Just look at AIDS treatment. It used to be that only the super-rich like Magic Johnson could afford the extensive costs associated with managing the disease. Now the medicine is becoming mainstream enough that they're able to defer some cost to treat the epidemic in Africa.


I took AIDS medicine before it was mainstream

/got nothin
 
2012-11-02 09:33:58 PM
good, next let's research nerve stapling centres
 
2012-11-02 09:47:06 PM
As a guy with cerebral palsy, I find this absolutely wonderful
 
2012-11-02 10:01:18 PM

Bio-nic: As a guy with cerebral palsy, I find this absolutely wonderful


As a guy whose sister has a spinal cord injury at the C4 level, I find this absolutely wonderful.
 
2012-11-02 10:02:40 PM

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.



Like cell phones or any other new technology. While it's still in its infancy it's expensive, but with time the price comes down as the technology becomes mature.
 
2012-11-02 10:10:25 PM
So, if I understand you correctly - and I think I do - you're saying we can rebuild him? Maybe, make him stronger?
 
2012-11-02 10:36:37 PM
The nerve of some people.

bowtiesheep: make him stronger?


We have the technology.
 
2012-11-02 10:38:14 PM
Will this help people with multiple sclerosis? My exgirlfriend has it, she just started doing the every other day self injections about 6 months ago(and she has to do it now for the rest of her life(she's 23)). No way in hell could I do that or deal with the rest or the problems caused by MS.
 
2012-11-02 10:50:58 PM

AntonChigger: Summoner101: Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.

Just look at AIDS treatment. It used to be that only the super-rich like Magic Johnson could afford the extensive costs associated with managing the disease. Now the medicine is becoming mainstream enough that they're able to defer some cost to treat the epidemic in Africa.

I took AIDS medicine before it was mainstream

/got nothin


I've always tried to be HIV POSITIVE!
 
2012-11-02 10:51:28 PM
Good, because you people are getting on my last nerve.
 
2012-11-02 11:05:58 PM
Axonal rewiring is such a complicated thing to design drugs for a lot of reasons. In the central nervous system, during early development and regions create their initial connections, projecting axonsare actually led through the neuroplasmic space in a way very similar to how single celled organisms "smell" particles in their medium, or more visually comparably, how roots grow through gravelly ground. In the peripheral nervous system, you're generally dealing with the severance of fairly few neurons. But the thing is, those few neurons are highly weighted on the cortex, so a sudden lack of input from them, even IF you could magically reconnect it, would lead to atrophy of the 'cluster' it innervates and its function.
 
2012-11-02 11:06:23 PM

urban.derelict: The nerve of some people.

bowtiesheep: make him stronger?

We have the technology.


faster/better... not so much.
 
2012-11-02 11:08:22 PM

PonceAlyosha: Axonal rewiring is such a complicated thing to design drugs for a lot of reasons. In the central nervous system, during early development and regions create their initial connections, projecting axonsare actually led through the neuroplasmic space in a way very similar to how single celled organisms "smell" particles in their medium, or more visually comparably, how roots grow through gravelly ground. In the peripheral nervous system, you're generally dealing with the severance of fairly few neurons. But the thing is, those few neurons are highly weighted on the cortex, so a sudden lack of input from them, even IF you could magically reconnect it, would lead to atrophy of the 'cluster' it innervates and its function.


**The difficulty is, in the actual adult brain, there's nearly no empty space for the axon to navigate through, so even if you have a neurogenic cell and the proper axonal guidance molecule gradient, you'd still have to worry about other damnable neurons in the way. That's why adult gross neuromodulation is through the formation of synapses and dendrites, and not the shuffling of axons.
 
2012-11-02 11:14:25 PM
cdn.mos.totalfilm.com

Mmmmmmmm fetus om nom nom
 
2012-11-02 11:14:53 PM
PonceAlyosha: how would this proposed therapy be modulated to only "repair" what's broken, and not, as someone else earlier intimated, make nerves all over the body grow out of control? That could be the most painful way to die, in a literal sense.
 
2012-11-02 11:22:02 PM

Any Pie Left: PonceAlyosha: how would this proposed therapy be modulated to only "repair" what's broken, and not, as someone else earlier intimated, make nerves all over the body grow out of control? That could be the most painful way to die, in a literal sense.


The problem isn't making a single cell grow into a healthy adult cell, for example using stem cell transplants, or stopping it from becoming cancerous. That is comparatively kid's stuff. The problem is once that cell matures, we can't make it connect to where it needs to. In the developing brain, there are a lot of different axonal guidance molecules that correspond to different types of neurons or glial cells, and through chemical gradients string them between each other like a woven rug whose strands never touch to the appropriately receptive regions of neurons. In adults, those chemical gradients don't exist. And even if we could induce them, they wouldn't lead to out of control cell growth, just, in the case of a single transplanted neuron, it not creating a synaptic connection with a receptive dendrite, so the cell, which can not transmit signal, atrophies and dies.
 
2012-11-02 11:25:10 PM

PonceAlyosha: Any Pie Left: PonceAlyosha: how would this proposed therapy be modulated to only "repair" what's broken, and not, as someone else earlier intimated, make nerves all over the body grow out of control? That could be the most painful way to die, in a literal sense.

The problem isn't making a single cell grow into a healthy adult cell, for example using stem cell transplants, or stopping it from becoming cancerous. That is comparatively kid's stuff. The problem is once that cell matures, we can't make it connect to where it needs to. In the developing brain, there are a lot of different axonal guidance molecules that correspond to different types of neurons or glial cells, and through chemical gradients string them between each other like a woven rug whose strands never touch to the appropriately receptive regions of neurons. In adults, those chemical gradients don't exist. And even if we could induce them, they wouldn't lead to out of control cell growth, just, in the case of a single transplanted neuron, it not creating a synaptic connection with a receptive dendrite, so the cell, which can not transmit signal, atrophies and dies.


Don't be such a negative nelly.

200 years ago, bloodletting was still the best cure for an infection. Then we got antibiotics. Ta-da.

You can't make the cell hook up. But animals can so obviously it's possible. The only thing is when will we discover a way for humans to do it? Not if, never if, only when.
 
2012-11-02 11:25:58 PM

PonceAlyosha: it not creating a synaptic connection with a receptive dendrite, so the cell, which can not transmit signal, atrophies and dies.


*It would lead to the neuron simply not creating a connection with the receptive dendrite. The axon, and the neuron it projects from, essentially becomes a dead end in what is nearly always a feedback loop and thus is pruned. Since the cell can not transmit signal, even if the cell healthily receives it. Thus the cell atrophies and dies, wasting the surgery to implant them in the first place.

Now that's only in the case of long projecting neurons, so layer four....To continue this conversation would get a bit to in depth, but this has nothing to do with the overall viability of neuronal stem cell transplants, just transplants attempting to replace the long motor and sensory neurons involved in paralysis.

The mammalian motor and spacial perceptive systems are probably the coolest things on the planet.
 
2012-11-02 11:29:13 PM

doglover: PonceAlyosha: Any Pie Left: PonceAlyosha: how would this proposed therapy be modulated to only "repair" what's broken, and not, as someone else earlier intimated, make nerves all over the body grow out of control? That could be the most painful way to die, in a literal sense.

The problem isn't making a single cell grow into a healthy adult cell, for example using stem cell transplants, or stopping it from becoming cancerous. That is comparatively kid's stuff. The problem is once that cell matures, we can't make it connect to where it needs to. In the developing brain, there are a lot of different axonal guidance molecules that correspond to different types of neurons or glial cells, and through chemical gradients string them between each other like a woven rug whose strands never touch to the appropriately receptive regions of neurons. In adults, those chemical gradients don't exist. And even if we could induce them, they wouldn't lead to out of control cell growth, just, in the case of a single transplanted neuron, it not creating a synaptic connection with a receptive dendrite, so the cell, which can not transmit signal, atrophies and dies.

Don't be such a negative nelly.

200 years ago, bloodletting was still the best cure for an infection. Then we got antibiotics. Ta-da.

You can't make the cell hook up. But animals can so obviously it's possible. The only thing is when will we discover a way for humans to do it? Not if, never if, only when.


I said you can't make the cell hook up through establishing a chemical gradient. There are other ways, in fact, the best one right now is the simplest. One of the most effective ways regain lost motor function, such as from a stroke, is applied constraint induced motion therapy, which very simply forces a limb to regain function by causing it to reconnect sensory and motor neuronal circuitry through repeated motions.

But seriously Donny you're out of your element.
 
2012-11-02 11:36:18 PM

PonceAlyosha: applied constraint induced motion therapy, which very simply forces a limb to regain function by causing it to reconnect sensory and motor neuronal circuitry through repeated motions.




You mean Mantis would possibly have been able to walk again as his suit would help neurons reconnect?
 
2012-11-02 11:43:21 PM

doglover: PonceAlyosha: applied constraint induced motion therapy, which very simply forces a limb to regain function by causing it to reconnect sensory and motor neuronal circuitry through repeated motions.



You mean Mantis would possibly have been able to walk again as his suit would help neurons reconnect?


I mean grandpa can move his left arm again if you tie it down and make him progressively more and more of what he can move for hours at a time for months. The doctor who invent/discovered/designed it is actually the infamous Dr. Taub, whom sparked some of the earliest PETA shennagans for his work deaffrenting the sensory neurons of monkey limbs, causing "sensory paralysis." Sensory paralysis is when an animal, or human, neglects a FULLY FUNCTIONAL, completely mobile limb because they get no sensory input from the movement. Here's the part that links it to what I mentioned before. Taub discovered that if you forced them to move the limb, even involuntarily, the monkeys would regain full motor function, and more importantly, the collateral sensory neurons involved in the motor loops would while not regenerate, make some repair. That's because the currency in all neuronal systems is signal. It drives growth and is the water and sunlight to the brain's beautiful tree.
 
2012-11-02 11:44:33 PM
♪ Talkin' 'bout regeneration... ♪
 
2012-11-02 11:47:34 PM

jack21221: Bio-nic: As a guy with cerebral palsy, I find this absolutely wonderful

As a guy whose sister has a spinal cord injury at the C4 level, I find this absolutely wonderful.


As a guy who severed the nerve leading to his outer pinky, I find this mildly intriguing.
 
2012-11-02 11:50:50 PM
My right brachial plexus is getting a real kick outta these comments.
 
2012-11-02 11:57:58 PM
This came at the right time: I-Team: Red Wine Compound Could Help Blindness Link
 
2012-11-03 12:09:15 AM

fsbilly: jack21221: Bio-nic: As a guy with cerebral palsy, I find this absolutely wonderful

As a guy whose sister has a spinal cord injury at the C4 level, I find this absolutely wonderful.

As a guy who severed the nerve leading to his outer pinky, I find this mildly intriguing.


As a brain in a jar connected to the internet, I find my pleasure centers are tingling.
 
2012-11-03 12:33:08 AM

mongbiohazard: Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.


Like cell phones or any other new technology. While it's still in its infancy it's expensive, but with time the price comes down as the technology becomes mature.



Really? You're living in fantasyland. Do you think for a minute that something that has eluded medical science like the regeneration of nerve cells is ever going to be packaged into an inexpensive cure that an uninsured blue collar worker is going to be able to afford? Give me a f*cking break.
 
2012-11-03 12:36:29 AM
As a guy who ... reads this, I find this intriguing. Seriously, this would be wonderful.
 
2012-11-03 12:41:04 AM

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.


Naaa, Obamacare will cover it, right?
 
2012-11-03 12:43:07 AM

Bonanza Jellybean: Huh. I had my money on drinking pureed rat-brain olfactory bulb shakes for their glial cells.


Personally, I find the pureed brains of 3rd trimester aborted fetuses work a lot better.
 
2012-11-03 12:59:55 AM

Boojum2k: Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: This could open up a new avenue of research into undoing the injuries that cause paralysis and other neurological disorders.

Of course, only the rich people will be able to afford the treatment if/when it finally becomes a reality. But hey -- at least those pesky equestrian competition accidents will no longer necessarily mean the end of a happy, normal ambulatory life for Muffy and her trust fund.

andthentheresthisguy.jpg


www.chinadaily.com.cn
 
2012-11-03 01:46:04 AM
We are living on the edge of amazing discoveries, as long as the fundies don't regress to the dark ages.
 
2012-11-03 06:53:22 AM

Richard Saunders: My right brachial plexus is getting a real kick outta these comments.


So is my right foot.

I have a line running from my back inside calf to the inside of my ankle and then down the side of my foot to the end of my big toe that simultaneously feels ice cold and tingly numb... all the time.

/also a knot of melted calf muscle the size of a baseball
//it still functions... just not very well and with a great deal of discomfort
//would willingly wait until others with more serious conditions are treated, of course
 
2012-11-03 08:03:07 AM
nerve regeneration? sweet! my wifes next husband won't have to learn what a dead f@ck she is.
 
2012-11-03 08:34:11 AM

iaazathot: We are living on the edge of amazing discoveries, as long as the fundies don't regress to the dark ages.


If it weren't for them we'd have more medical progress.
 
2012-11-03 09:22:11 PM
As someone who has done their best to eliminate all their nerves I welcome this news.

/Also, done in one.
 
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