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(Some brewing Guy)   Fire up the kettle and break out your wort chiller. Tomorrow is National Learn to Homebrew Day   (homebrewersassociation.org) divider line 115
    More: Spiffy, chillers  
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1097 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Nov 2012 at 3:38 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-02 01:19:23 PM  
I'm not brewing tomorrow but I am planning to start a winter warmer on Sunday.
 
2012-11-02 01:20:23 PM  
I have a coffee chocolate stout that should be ready to drink tomorrow.  
 
2012-11-02 01:33:06 PM  
I didn't realize it was tomorrow. However, I'm prepared. Tomorrow I'll be doing a mocha oatmeal stout and a holiday-spiced strong ale.
 
2012-11-02 01:40:00 PM  
That's tomorrow? I'll celebrate by sharing my honey porter with the friends that usually stand and watch the kettle boil.
 
2012-11-02 01:43:39 PM  
Oi kavult! I read that as "Hebrew".
 
2012-11-02 01:47:04 PM  
That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.
 
2012-11-02 01:52:12 PM  

Diogenes: Oi kavult! I read that as "Hebrew".


i did too. oy vey.
 
2012-11-02 02:25:43 PM  

Diogenes: Oi kavult! I read that as "Hebrew".


i.chzbgr.com
 
2012-11-02 02:29:01 PM  

BooBoo23: That's tomorrow? I'll celebrate by sharing my honey porter with the friends that usually stand and watch the kettle boil.


I have a honey ale kegged and ready for drinking on Tuesday.
 
2012-11-02 02:33:54 PM  

GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.


0/10
 
2012-11-02 02:37:05 PM  
I'm going to a brew festival tonight, and have a beer I could make tomorrow. I have a bunch of stuff to do tomorrow though, so it might get pushed to Sunday.
 
2012-11-02 03:16:32 PM  
I've got a berliner weisse, a milk stout and a scotch ale going right now. Going to bottle the berliner weisse this weekend and brew me a barleywine.
 
2012-11-02 03:30:39 PM  
Last time I tried homebrew was two years ago with a honey mead recipe. It was so goddamn strong, but at the same time undrinkable. Still got the carboy, maybe I'll try something else in the future.
 
2012-11-02 03:46:18 PM  
Have ten gallons of ballpark red burbling away as we speak.

/burble
//burble burble
///burble burble burble
 
2012-11-02 03:46:35 PM  
gopher321: Last time I tried homebrew was two years ago with a honey mead recipe. It was so goddamn strong, but at the same time undrinkable. Still got the carboy, maybe I'll try something else in the future.

You got any of the mead left over? I bet it's pretty good now if you do.

/ "Pumpkin" porter conditioning in bottles
// Next up: begging SWMBO to let me do the cherry chocolate stout
 
2012-11-02 03:46:43 PM  
my wife's words : this can only end in tears...
 
2012-11-02 03:47:57 PM  

gopher321: Last time I tried homebrew was two years ago with a honey mead recipe. It was so goddamn strong, but at the same time undrinkable. Still got the carboy, maybe I'll try something else in the future.


yeah, someone should have told you, mead has to sit. you can't just tap off the carboy and drink it.

generally needs to sit for 20-30 years, according to one mead-maker i know, before it's really ready.
 
2012-11-02 03:49:42 PM  
FlashHarry: Diogenes: Oi kavult! I read that as "Hebrew".

i did too. oy vey.


L'chaim!

brewpublic.com
 
2012-11-02 03:53:55 PM  
If your a more experienced brewer, and want something amazing, try out the New Holland co.'s "Dragon's Milk"
It's about halfway down the page.

Nectar of the gods
 
2012-11-02 03:56:14 PM  
Well, I guess I'll take another crack an my own root beer. Last batch came out terrible. Need more spices and less yeast.
 
2012-11-02 03:57:04 PM  
Jubelale clone conditioning away, should be ready when I kick either the Belgian IPA (Houblon clone) or the Trippel. Also have a barleywine aging on french oak....why am I so thirsty all of a sudden?
 
2012-11-02 03:57:27 PM  
I think I'm going to go against the seasonal style and make a wheat.
 
2012-11-02 03:57:28 PM  
I have some Wee Heavy and some brown ale. I have kolsch a Bavarian helles waiting to be brewed up. Replacing struts on Saturday so maybe Sunday?
 
2012-11-02 03:57:37 PM  
I would like to toss out a trade secret here. Brewing beer is a great date activity. You get to see how she does in the kitchen. If it works out its a cool story and if not you have something to help you forget.

Meghan was ok
Brittany was good
Megan was bad
Might start an Alicia this weekend ;-)

a tip though, don't get stoned and shag during the boil stage... pick one or the other.
 
2012-11-02 03:58:54 PM  

Tango_down: I would like to toss out a trade secret here. Brewing beer is a great date activity. You get to see how she does in the kitchen. If it works out its a cool story and if not you have something to help you forget.

Meghan was ok
Brittany was good
Megan was bad
Might start an Alicia this weekend ;-)

a tip though, don't get stoned and shag during the boil stage... pick one or the other.


I remember I ruined a batch because I got drunk and fell asleep while brewing. Wish I could say it was from banging.

Either way, don't take impairing agents in large quantities while you brew, kids.
 
2012-11-02 03:59:37 PM  
Woot! More excuses to brew.

Just started a month ago, 4 brews done thus far, loving this hobby (plus, it's wife sactioned!).

Need to get to whole grain to get costs down.... Happy brewing all.

/Amber Ale finished two days ago,
//Oktoberfest is ready for consumption tonight
///Xmass ale in primary, brewed last Thurs
////Belgian (strong) Pale Ale brewed last night.
// Cool Stories and slashies don't steep very well...
 
2012-11-02 04:00:10 PM  
Started a winter warmer yesterday. Think I'll make a Belgian Double in a few weeks.
 
2012-11-02 04:00:42 PM  
Viking Blod mead clone is ready to brew this weekend. 13lbs of summer wildflower honey, some aged hops, and plenty of hibiscus and I'm ready to roll.

Should end up ~16%abv when all is said & done. If you haven't tried the original I highly suggest it, though it isn't cheap.
 
2012-11-02 04:03:48 PM  

MoronLessOff: Well, I guess I'll take another crack an my own root beer. Last batch came out terrible. Need more spices and less yeast.


What are you using as a base recipe? I've tried a few runs, but none came out too rootbeer-y. I don't have the recipe in front of me but it was mostly sarsaparilla root with licorice and some other herbs and spices.

I've had better luck with orange cream soda which was basically whole vanilla bean, orange & lemon peel, and some bitter orange peel.
 
2012-11-02 04:04:24 PM  
...only one more week until my first batch is ready. a nice, strong rasputin stout clone...

/thirsty!
 
2012-11-02 04:06:10 PM  
Been quiet in the brewery, but I've got a blackberry cider to keg. 25 lbs of blackberries in 5 gallons.
 
2012-11-02 04:06:32 PM  
My husband loves to listen to homebrewing podcasts, but we only just moved into a house where we have space for brewing a couple weeks ago. Perhaps I'll kick him into starting something in the kitschy Mr. Beer kit I got him as a joke a couple years ago until we're unpacked enough to set up for proper brewing.

/I hate beer.
 
2012-11-02 04:07:14 PM  

Diogenes: Oi kavult! I read that as "Hebrew".

 

img69.imageshack.us
 
2012-11-02 04:09:01 PM  
Ive homebrewed once before. Sugar apple juice and yeast. It was toe curlingly terrible, but would get you blind drunk in a hurry.hmmm, maybe should give it another crack.
 
2012-11-02 04:09:02 PM  

pastorkius: MoronLessOff: Well, I guess I'll take another crack an my own root beer. Last batch came out terrible. Need more spices and less yeast.

What are you using as a base recipe? I've tried a few runs, but none came out too rootbeer-y. I don't have the recipe in front of me but it was mostly sarsaparilla root with licorice and some other herbs and spices.

I've had better luck with orange cream soda which was basically whole vanilla bean, orange & lemon peel, and some bitter orange peel.


The recipe is at home with my bottling gear. But I have sasparilla, licorice root, star anise (which smells awesome), vanilla bean (or pure extract, those beans are expensive), stick cinnamon, pure cane and brown sugar and honey. Ale yeast for in-bottle carbonation. I may have more spices, but it's been a while since I last tried.
 
2012-11-02 04:11:03 PM  

Holocaust Agnostic: Ive homebrewed once before. Sugar apple juice and yeast. It was toe curlingly terrible, but would get you blind drunk in a hurry.hmmm, maybe should give it another crack.


I've thought about doing this with some tasty cider from the local farmers' market.
 
2012-11-02 04:11:05 PM  

Holocaust Agnostic: Ive homebrewed once before. Sugar apple juice and yeast. It was toe curlingly terrible, but would get you blind drunk in a hurry.hmmm, maybe should give it another crack.


Perhaps you used too much sugar?
 
2012-11-02 04:20:35 PM  

John_Denver_Lives: I've got a berliner weisse, a milk stout and a scotch ale going right now. Going to bottle the berliner weisse this weekend and brew me a barleywine.


Wow! I too have a Berliner weisse going (not sour enough yet) a milk stout carbonating and I'm working on a wee heavy recipe right now. I also have a dubbel in primary, a mild to keg, an old bruin in secondary and absolutely no social life.
 
2012-11-02 04:22:40 PM  
Holy Carp, I forgot: I also started a Barolo and *then* I remembered the damn rye porter.

Nope. No social life.
 
2012-11-02 04:23:17 PM  
Well, ain't that some shiat? I was planning on starting a batch Saturday anyway. Nice.
 
2012-11-02 04:25:04 PM  

Treygreen13: Holocaust Agnostic: Ive homebrewed once before. Sugar apple juice and yeast. It was toe curlingly terrible, but would get you blind drunk in a hurry.hmmm, maybe should give it another crack.

Perhaps you used too much sugar?


badly balanced Ph, no tannins, and terrible mineral content(most likely NO significant mineral content as i'm willing to be store-bought apple juice in a bottle, from concentrate) are far more likely causes of terrible flavor than too much sugar. possibly bread yeast but maybe not.

starting a cider this month, going to be a whopper. rendering the juice myself and throwing in some fun additionals, rum-soaked oak chips(medium toast), a few hops, a smidge of honey, a little cinnamon and nutmeg... nothing crazy but enough to lift the apple flavor.

/brewing is science for drunken people.
 
2012-11-02 04:25:05 PM  
I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.
 
2012-11-02 04:26:21 PM  
I've recently started myself.

I currently have 5 gallons of Caramel Hard Cider that just got bottled, (2) 5 gallon batches of Cherry Berry Mead racked which hopefully will be ready for my wedding next june, 5 gallons of Lime Skeeter Pee

The cider has potential but needs to sit for a few weeks still before the flavors are finished.
 
2012-11-02 04:26:40 PM  

poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.


That tears it. I'll forgo root beer this weekend and pick me up a gallon or two of cider and some fresh yeast.
 
2012-11-02 04:27:47 PM  
I had a minor failure of a wee heavy I made. Stupid me got distracted watching the bronco game and let my sparge water get too hot extracting some tannins and too many non-fermentable sugars. It's the worst beer I've made, but it's still better than bud light.

I've got an ambitious project for a snickers stout that i want to make. I just need to get around to ordering the powdered peanut butter.
 
2012-11-02 04:29:43 PM  

poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.


This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great
 
2012-11-02 04:29:57 PM  
I only have half a batch of barleywine and a few bottle of witbier left. I have been meaning to brew for about a month now but keeping the kids looked after and the yard winiterized doen't happen by itself. Maybe this weekend I can do my servicable pilsner and porter. Neither very exciting but darn good simple drinking beers.
 
2012-11-02 04:34:36 PM  

Communist_Manifesto: poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.

This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great

This thread is quite good for a first time cider. This is the one i am making. Its quite easy.
 
2012-11-02 04:34:59 PM  
A friend of mine has put up the brown ale he brews for the traditional Turkey Fry the weekend before Thanksgiving. It's pretty delicious.
 
2012-11-02 04:35:09 PM  

VoodooTaco: Woot! More excuses to brew.

Just started a month ago, 4 brews done thus far, loving this hobby (plus, it's wife sactioned!).

Need to get to whole grain to get costs down.... Happy brewing all.

/Amber Ale finished two days ago,
//Oktoberfest is ready for consumption tonight
///Xmass ale in primary, brewed last Thurs
////Belgian (strong) Pale Ale brewed last night.
// Cool Stories and slashies don't steep very well...


I recommend starting whole grain ASAP. Wife and I built a mash tun out of a 12-gallon cooler and never looked back.

It's not nearly as hard as you might think (if you haven't done it yet). For me it was just a matter of using more water and scheduling an extra two hours for mash time / extra cleanup.

I highly recommend the Thunderstruck Pumpkin Ale (first hit on google, homebrewtalk) - my favorite batch so far.
 
2012-11-02 04:39:50 PM  

James!: I have a coffee chocolate stout that should be ready to drink tomorrow.


Just finished a Whiskey Stout. We soaked wood chips from a used whiskey cask in it for a week and added a touch of cinnamon (for that holiday essence).
 
2012-11-02 04:42:29 PM  

Loki009: Communist_Manifesto: poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.

This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great
This thread is quite good for a first time cider. This is the one i am making. Its quite easy.


Nice, but I don't have the gear for that much brewing. I can do 1.5 gallons in 16 oz bottles. I'll have to cut that down a bit, but caramel apple cider sounds awesome.
 
2012-11-02 04:44:35 PM  

Loki009: Communist_Manifesto: poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.

This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great
This thread is quite good for a first time cider. This is the one i am making. Its quite easy.


Aww homebrewtalk, is there anything you can't do? I think tomorrow might be a good day for this.

Not that anyone cares, but this is the best beer/recipe I've come up with myself: Link

I like to use the ringwood ale yeast because it ferments faster than any other yeast I've ever seen and it adds some good fruity esters. You have to let it sit for at least 2 weeks in primary as ringwood requires a diacetyl rest. It got pretty high marks at the denver county fair homebrew competition but didn't win.
 
2012-11-02 04:52:45 PM  

Communist_Manifesto: Not that anyone cares, but this is the best beer/recipe I've come up with myself: Link


That one sounds fun. Time to bottle my British Brown Ale, clear out a carboy and get some ingredients.
 
2012-11-02 04:58:38 PM  

MoronLessOff: Loki009: Communist_Manifesto: poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.

This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great
This thread is quite good for a first time cider. This is the one i am making. Its quite easy.

Nice, but I don't have the gear for that much brewing. I can do 1.5 gallons in 16 oz bottles. I'll have to cut that down a bit, but caramel apple cider sounds awesome.


I didnt either, however the equipment isnt expensive or hard to get. My local brew supply house sells 6.5 gallon PET carboys for $25. Other than that you only really need a siphon and something to bottle into.
 
2012-11-02 05:06:04 PM  

violentsalvation: GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.

0/10


I'd give it a 1/10, because it made me laugh.
 
2012-11-02 05:09:08 PM  

Modguy: violentsalvation: GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.

0/10

I'd give it a 1/10, because it made me laugh.


It takes on a new meaning if you just look at the first letter of each line.
 
2012-11-02 05:12:08 PM  

Communist_Manifesto: I had a minor failure of a wee heavy I made. Stupid me got distracted watching the bronco game and let my sparge water get too hot extracting some tannins and too many non-fermentable sugars. It's the worst beer I've made, but it's still better than bud light.

I've got an ambitious project for a snickers stout that i want to make. I just need to get around to ordering the powdered peanut butter.


Won't the oil in the peanut butter screw up your head retention? And the salt in the peanut butter...I admit to the curiosity, here.
 
2012-11-02 05:13:23 PM  

GreenAdder: Modguy: violentsalvation: GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.

0/10

I'd give it a 1/10, because it made me laugh.

It takes on a new meaning if you just look at the first letter of each line.


HA! Excellent.
 
2012-11-02 05:19:13 PM  
I was just about to start my first homebrew experiment with mead. I've got most of the gear but it will be a week or two before I can get the carboys.
 
2012-11-02 05:21:11 PM  

Loki009: MoronLessOff: Loki009: Communist_Manifesto: poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.

This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great
This thread is quite good for a first time cider. This is the one i am making. Its quite easy.

Nice, but I don't have the gear for that much brewing. I can do 1.5 gallons in 16 oz bottles. I'll have to cut that down a bit, but caramel apple cider sounds awesome.

I didnt either, however the equipment isnt expensive or hard to get. My local brew supply house sells 6.5 gallon PET carboys for $25. Other than that you only really need a siphon and something to bottle into.


bellsbeer.com
Plus spigot, tubing and bottle filler. Unfortunately, the spigot is at about the half gallon mark, so when it gets that low, I have to use my funnels.

I also have these beauties: 
www.rebelbrewer.com
 
2012-11-02 05:29:45 PM  
Since people are interested, here's the cider. My recipes are all for 5 gallon batches, so if you want to do it smaller you'll have to adapt.

Materials:
5 gallons fresh apple cider. Make sure it says "UV pasteurized" or "preservative free" on the label. Chemical preservatives will kill your yeast.
5 Campden tablets: Ask your nearest homebrew store
1 tbsp yeast nutrient: see above
2 lbs dark brown sugar
1 vial cider yeast. Cote des Blanc wine yeast also works well. I've started avoiding champagne yeast because it adds too much of its own flavor.

Method:
Add the cider to your fermenter. Crush up the Campden tablets between 2 spoons. Add the Campden powder and yeast nutrient. Seal up fermenter with airlock, wait approximately 24 hours and add your yeast.

Warning: cider smells AWFUL while its fermenting, so keep it in the basement or garage if you can.

Once fermentation has slowed (1 bubble every 30 sec or so from the airlock), heat up a quart of water and dissolve the brown sugar. Once its cooled to room tempish, add the syrup to the fermenter. If you really want to, you can add the sugar initially with the Campden and yeast nutriet, but I like to add it second because the second wave of fermentation seems to blow out any remaining sulfur-y gasses and produce a better product.

After fermentation has ceased again, you can transfer it to a secondary fermenter if you have one, or let it sit a week longer and get ready to bottle.

For the apple pie, I use 1 jar of cinnamon sticks, a few dozen cloves, and about two ounces of fresh ginger grated up. If you like other spices in your pie, throw 'em in! Simmer the spices in a pint of water (or infuse them for a week in a bottle of vodka). I like to add my spices to the bottling bucket at bottling time. That way your volatile essential oils don't get blown away during fermentation, and you have better control over dosing. Trust me, too much cinnamon or cloves will ruin a good cider so its nice to be able to dose it in slowly.

Prime with half a cup of white sugar dissolved in 1 cup of boiling water, bottle, cap, and condition.
 
2012-11-02 05:31:24 PM  

mainsail: Communist_Manifesto: I had a minor failure of a wee heavy I made. Stupid me got distracted watching the bronco game and let my sparge water get too hot extracting some tannins and too many non-fermentable sugars. It's the worst beer I've made, but it's still better than bud light.

I've got an ambitious project for a snickers stout that i want to make. I just need to get around to ordering the powdered peanut butter.

Won't the oil in the peanut butter screw up your head retention? And the salt in the peanut butter...I admit to the curiosity, here.


The oil in normal peanut butter will destroy head retention. However! There is a company that de-oils the peanut butter and turns it into powder. The product is called PB2 and can be bought online so no salt or oil to worry about. I did a mock up of the recipe, but I was really stoned so now that I'm looking at it I'm second guessing the amount of honey malt I used but if you want to look at it here's a link
 
2012-11-02 05:38:10 PM  

poorjon: Since people are interested, here's the cider


It may sound like a lot of work, but its seriously only a couple of hours spaced over a few weeks.
 
2012-11-02 05:55:50 PM  
I am picking up almost 100 pounds of grain tomorrow morning. It should be enough to get me through most of the year-55 lbs of 2-row, 30 pound of Maris Otter, and 17 pounds of Crystal II. First up is an English barleywine and and bitter from the same mash...then probably an IPA or a pale. Took part in a group buy-we bought over 9000 pounds of grain from County Malt Group.

I will be spending the afternoon on a road trip to 3 Floyd's though so no brewing for me until Sunday.

Tonight we are gonna check out the new Half Acre tap room in Chicago.
 
2012-11-02 06:01:47 PM  
Late to the party but I am:
1. Bottling our Bourbon Stout
2. Moving our Spiced Winter into secondary (Biofine FTW)
3. Starting on our Raspberry Chocolate Stout
 
2012-11-02 06:05:41 PM  
Also making my Stir Plate
 
2012-11-02 06:07:16 PM  
sweeptight.com

For the minimalist home brewer.

/a jar of juice and this thing
/it's sort of like cloudy champagne mixed with fruit juice...a poor man's Bellini
 
2012-11-02 06:11:22 PM  
img841.imageshack.us

Should be bottled on Sunday. But I could do it on Saturday in order to honor HomeBrewing day. It's my tradition to do all my brewing related activities on Sunday.

Hey, you have your religion, I have mine.
 
2012-11-02 06:13:22 PM  
right on!
 
2012-11-02 06:15:26 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: [img841.imageshack.us image 478x640]

Should be bottled on Sunday. But I could do it on Saturday in order to honor HomeBrewing day. It's my tradition to do all my brewing related activities on Sunday.

Hey, you have your religion, I have mine.


Wtf is in the carboy on the left? Are you making orange wine or something?
 
2012-11-02 07:02:56 PM  

poorjon: Since people are interested, here's the cider. My recipes are all for 5 gallon batches, so if you want to do it smaller you'll have to adapt.

Materials:
5 gallons fresh apple cider. Make sure it says "UV pasteurized" or "preservative free" on the label. Chemical preservatives will kill your yeast.
5 Campden tablets: Ask your nearest homebrew store
1 tbsp yeast nutrient: see above
2 lbs dark brown sugar
1 vial cider yeast. Cote des Blanc wine yeast also works well. I've started avoiding champagne yeast because it adds too much of its own flavor.

Method:
Add the cider to your fermenter. Crush up the Campden tablets between 2 spoons. Add the Campden powder and yeast nutrient. Seal up fermenter with airlock, wait approximately 24 hours and add your yeast.

Warning: cider smells AWFUL while its fermenting, so keep it in the basement or garage if you can.

Once fermentation has slowed (1 bubble every 30 sec or so from the airlock), heat up a quart of water and dissolve the brown sugar. Once its cooled to room tempish, add the syrup to the fermenter. If you really want to, you can add the sugar initially with the Campden and yeast nutriet, but I like to add it second because the second wave of fermentation seems to blow out any remaining sulfur-y gasses and produce a better product.

After fermentation has ceased again, you can transfer it to a secondary fermenter if you have one, or let it sit a week longer and get ready to bottle.

For the apple pie, I use 1 jar of cinnamon sticks, a few dozen cloves, and about two ounces of fresh ginger grated up. If you like other spices in your pie, throw 'em in! Simmer the spices in a pint of water (or infuse them for a week in a bottle of vodka). I like to add my spices to the bottling bucket at bottling time. That way your volatile essential oils don't get blown away during fermentation, and you have better control over dosing. Trust me, too much cinnamon or cloves will ruin a good cider so its nice to be able to dose it in slowl ...


Ive done this for year except

5 gal Apple juice (motts)
2 lbs corn sugar
1 packet Montrachet

Mix(everything sanatized with Sanstar)- ferment- wait till it clears. Bottle with carb drops. Wait 3 weeks. Fridge enjoy.

Never had an issue and always turns out epic.
 
2012-11-02 07:03:30 PM  
Here in Alabamastan, it is still illegal to brew your own (but it's okay to make your own wine- go figure).
However, I just tapped my keg of this year's pumpkin ale (Papazian's recipe) this afternoon. Not as good as I'd hoped, but not terrible, either. Force carbed for just 24 hours, so maybe it'll settle down. Could also have been the recipe. Either way, I've had much better pumpkin ales.
American brown goes to secondary tomorrow. Primary will be replaced with a Dale's Pale clone while watching the Tide. Central Alabama garages are at perfect ale temps right now.
Happy brewing, everyone!
 
2012-11-02 07:04:47 PM  
Last time I tried to make some wine, I had a cloud of grey mold growing in the airlock, which was filled with sani-clean or whatever the fk it is called.

Then I looked at the bottle of liquid sani-clean I had mixed up from the crystal powder packet, and it too had mold growing in it.

What the fk is that stuffs job???!!! 3 days and it grew mold.

Next time I'll use Vodka.
 
2012-11-02 07:11:13 PM  

newton: Last time I tried to make some wine, I had a cloud of grey mold growing in the airlock, which was filled with sani-clean or whatever the fk it is called.

Then I looked at the bottle of liquid sani-clean I had mixed up from the crystal powder packet, and it too had mold growing in it.

What the fk is that stuffs job???!!! 3 days and it grew mold.

Next time I'll use Vodka.


I don't think vodak is the proper medium for growing mold.
 
2012-11-02 07:22:14 PM  
Seems there are a lot of homebrew farkers around. Maybe one of you can answer my question:

I've often heard that it's illegal to brew moonshine but I know plenty of people brew their own beer. What gives? Does it become illegal to brew alcohol over a certain proof? Is it a state by state thing? Please help! I'm far FAR too lazy to copy paste this post into Google and click the first link.

/Thanks in advance.
 
2012-11-02 07:27:42 PM  

GreenAdder: Modguy: violentsalvation: GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.

0/10

I'd give it a 1/10, because it made me laugh.

It takes on a new meaning if you just look at the first letter of each line.


10/10
 
2012-11-02 07:28:23 PM  

Honest Bender: Seems there are a lot of homebrew farkers around. Maybe one of you can answer my question:

I've often heard that it's illegal to brew moonshine but I know plenty of people brew their own beer. What gives? Does it become illegal to brew alcohol over a certain proof? Is it a state by state thing? Please help! I'm far FAR too lazy to copy paste this post into Google and click the first link.

/Thanks in advance.


You dont "brew" moonshine. You distill it. The reason they have it illegal is you can possibly make it posionus either using lead solder or pipes, using methanol fermenting ingredients.

It can be dangerous- stills can generat some pressure. Add a leak and an open flame- they can explode.

What it comes down to is avoiding taxes on one of the most highly taxed items you can buy

moonshine is Grain fermented- Distilled- drank cut or uncut. Thats it.
 
2012-11-02 07:41:32 PM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: You dont "brew" moonshine. You distill it. The reason they have it illegal is you can possibly make it posionus either using lead solder or pipes, using methanol fermenting ingredients.

It can be dangerous- stills can generat some pressure. Add a leak and an open flame- they can explode.

What it comes down to is avoiding taxes on one of the most highly taxed items you can buy

moonshine is Grain fermented- Distilled- drank cut or uncut. Thats it.


Interesting... So it's primarily a safety issue? Hmm. Thanks for the info!
 
2012-11-02 07:49:13 PM  
If anyone is in Toronto, Amsterdam Brewing is hosting a learn to brew. Even if you already know how to brew, it is a good excuse to come meet lots of fellow brewers.
 
2012-11-02 07:55:09 PM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: Honest Bender: Seems there are a lot of homebrew farkers around. Maybe one of you can answer my question:

I've often heard that it's illegal to brew moonshine but I know plenty of people brew their own beer. What gives? Does it become illegal to brew alcohol over a certain proof? Is it a state by state thing? Please help! I'm far FAR too lazy to copy paste this post into Google and click the first link.

/Thanks in advance.

You dont "brew" moonshine. You distill it. The reason they have it illegal is you can possibly make it posionus either using lead solder or pipes, using methanol fermenting ingredients.

It can be dangerous- stills can generat some pressure. Add a leak and an open flame- they can explode.

What it comes down to is avoiding taxes on one of the most highly taxed items you can buy

moonshine is Grain fermented- Distilled- drank cut or uncut. Thats it.


distillation is still illegal less for safety reasons(they sell cigarettes, after all), and more for taxation reasons. you can make a LOT of money selling a little whiskey. the man's got to have his cut.
 
2012-11-02 08:34:36 PM  

poorjon: Since people are interested, here's the cider. My recipes are all for 5 gallon batches, so if you want to do it smaller you'll have to adapt.

Materials:
5 gallons fresh apple cider. Make sure it says "UV pasteurized" or "preservative free" on the label. Chemical preservatives will kill your yeast.
5 Campden tablets: Ask your nearest homebrew store
1 tbsp yeast nutrient: see above
2 lbs dark brown sugar
1 vial cider yeast. Cote des Blanc wine yeast also works well. I've started avoiding champagne yeast because it adds too much of its own flavor.

Method:
Add the cider to your fermenter. Crush up the Campden tablets between 2 spoons. Add the Campden powder and yeast nutrient. Seal up fermenter with airlock, wait approximately 24 hours and add your yeast.

Warning: cider smells AWFUL while its fermenting, so keep it in the basement or garage if you can.

Once fermentation has slowed (1 bubble every 30 sec or so from the airlock), heat up a quart of water and dissolve the brown sugar. Once its cooled to room tempish, add the syrup to the fermenter. If you really want to, you can add the sugar initially with the Campden and yeast nutriet, but I like to add it second because the second wave of fermentation seems to blow out any remaining sulfur-y gasses and produce a better product.

After fermentation has ceased again, you can transfer it to a secondary fermenter if you have one, or let it sit a week longer and get ready to bottle.

For the apple pie, I use 1 jar of cinnamon sticks, a few dozen cloves, and about two ounces of fresh ginger grated up. If you like other spices in your pie, throw 'em in! Simmer the spices in a pint of water (or infuse them for a week in a bottle of vodka). I like to add my spices to the bottling bucket at bottling time. That way your volatile essential oils don't get blown away during fermentation, and you have better control over dosing. Trust me, too much cinnamon or cloves will ruin a good cider so its nice to be able to dose it in slowly.

Prime with half a cup of white sugar dissolved in 1 cup of boiling water, bottle, cap, and condition.


The reason that it smells is likely that you aren't using enough nutrient for the yeast. It's normally .5 to 1 tsp per gallon if I recall correctly. The sulfur smell is from when yeast is in a low nutrient environment from my research.
 
2012-11-02 08:40:57 PM  
American amber ale of my own concoction is on deck for tomorrow.
 
2012-11-02 08:43:03 PM  

MoronLessOff: Loki009: MoronLessOff: Loki009: Communist_Manifesto: poorjon: I love me some brewing, but fall is for cider! Once you've made your first batch, you'll never stop. No boiling, just add the yeast and go. Opened the apple pie cider a little while ago and it is awesome. Also have a bourbon barrel cider getting ready for aging.

This seems relevant to my interests. You have a link to a recipe that's really good? This apple pie cider sounds great
This thread is quite good for a first time cider. This is the one i am making. Its quite easy.

Nice, but I don't have the gear for that much brewing. I can do 1.5 gallons in 16 oz bottles. I'll have to cut that down a bit, but caramel apple cider sounds awesome.

I didnt either, however the equipment isnt expensive or hard to get. My local brew supply house sells 6.5 gallon PET carboys for $25. Other than that you only really need a siphon and something to bottle into.


Plus spigot, tubing and bottle filler. Unfortunately, the spigot is at about the half gallon mark, so when it gets that low, I have to use my funnels.

I also have these beauties: 


Then you have pretty much what you need. Just get a hydrometer to take gravity readings and you are set
 
2012-11-02 10:01:17 PM  
Well that's a coincidence. Doing my first brew tomorrow.
 
2012-11-02 10:13:44 PM  
This weekend is a wash.

Next weekend though I've got a Belgian Pale Ale and then every weekend after that I've got a schedule to keep until December.
 
2012-11-02 10:25:40 PM  

Loki009: The reason that it smells is likely that you aren't using enough nutrient for the yeast. It's normally .5 to 1 tsp per gallon if I recall correctly. The sulfur smell is from when yeast is in a low nutrient environment from my research.


I'm using slightly higher than that ratio. At first I thought it was sulfur from the campden, but I've fermented a batch without campden and it still stank. At this point I'm just working on the hypothesis that apple juice has a lot of sulfur bound up in it in a way which is normally unoffensive to our senses and yeast knows how to release it. A lot of beer yeasts also generate a fair amount of sulfur during fermentation, and wort is far more nutritious than cider.
 
2012-11-02 10:47:15 PM  

poorjon: Loki009: The reason that it smells is likely that you aren't using enough nutrient for the yeast. It's normally .5 to 1 tsp per gallon if I recall correctly. The sulfur smell is from when yeast is in a low nutrient environment from my research.

I'm using slightly higher than that ratio. At first I thought it was sulfur from the campden, but I've fermented a batch without campden and it still stank. At this point I'm just working on the hypothesis that apple juice has a lot of sulfur bound up in it in a way which is normally unoffensive to our senses and yeast knows how to release it. A lot of beer yeasts also generate a fair amount of sulfur during fermentation, and wort is far more nutritious than cider.


might be your apples. or your yeast. have you tried switching up varieties of apples? there's a good dozen varieties that are awesome for cider that you can procure if you know where to go.
 
2012-11-02 10:57:22 PM  
I've tried juice from about five different orchards, and at least four strains of yeast.
 
2012-11-02 11:00:25 PM  

Communist_Manifesto: mainsail: Communist_Manifesto: I had a minor failure of a wee heavy I made. Stupid me got distracted watching the bronco game and let my sparge water get too hot extracting some tannins and too many non-fermentable sugars. It's the worst beer I've made, but it's still better than bud light.

I've got an ambitious project for a snickers stout that i want to make. I just need to get around to ordering the powdered peanut butter.

Won't the oil in the peanut butter screw up your head retention? And the salt in the peanut butter...I admit to the curiosity, here.

The oil in normal peanut butter will destroy head retention. However! There is a company that de-oils the peanut butter and turns it into powder. The product is called PB2 and can be bought online so no salt or oil to worry about. I did a mock up of the recipe, but I was really stoned so now that I'm looking at it I'm second guessing the amount of honey malt I used but if you want to look at it here's a link



That does seem a tad heavy in honey malt, especially with the dark malt LME. But my other concern with the peanut butter is what the intensity of the flavor, is. Also, why not cocoa nibs?
 
2012-11-02 11:28:34 PM  
I was planning on it, but then I was told I have to fly to Syracuse, NY for work on Monday, and it's kinda an open ended ticket. I don't want to start a beer without being home to keep an eye on it.. At least they have some decent microbrews in the area.
 
2012-11-02 11:37:21 PM  
Reposted from another site, by a user named namelessbrewer: http://www.reddit.com/r/beer/comments/12goc1/light_beer_you_dont_h ave_ to_like_it_but_respect_it/c6v2wef

I'm a brewer. Not a homebrewer, but a guy who's worked nearly a decare in breweries large and small. I worked in one of the largest breweries in North America churning out 7+ million barrels a year. Now I work for a craft brewery with an annual production comparable to what I used to make in a week. I left to go smaller, and took a pay cut, because I didn't like the culture of the company anymore and wanted to go to a place where I felt I would fit in. To all of you folks who are hating on the big guys, let's set a few things straight:

Light beers didn't come to dominate the Global beer market because it sucks and everyone hates them. There was a steady evolution of consolidation in America as manufacturing techniques improved. Where 75 years ago there was a brewery in every region turning out good to great beers that were different everywhere, they were also inconsistent. And there was a lot of spoilage. Americans bought in to lighter and lighter beers. And the breweries who produced them the best had more sales, and the other breweries failed. Light beers weren't pushed down Americans throats, they were pulled from breweries by the demands of Americans.

The devotion of the large breweries to product quality is the ONLY reason that you can get a consistent craft beer today. There was no science put behind yeast and microbiological spoilage organisms until THEY did the research and discovered it. There would be no standards for cleanliness without them. People wouldn't know that diacetyl could be produced by latent alpha-acetolactate after beer was bottled. People wouldn't understand that if you ferment the same yeast at different temperatures, you can get completely different flavors. The big brewers developed the methods to detect and identify spoilage organisms in a brewery. Why does the same type of hop lend different bitterness at different times? Because of what they learned, we know that the alpha acid % is what determines bitterness. Without any of this knowledge, the craft brewing industry would not be anywhere close to where it is today because nobody could brew the strong, complex brews that craft brewers make.

Brewmasters at large breweries have to deal with more problems than you will ever understand. Oh gee, it was rainy in central Canada in March and April. Who cares? Well, since the fields were flooded, barley is going to be planted late, so its not going to come in full. Now you're going to have barley that is low in extract and high in color because it had two weeks less to grow this year and it had to be kilned more to keep the enzymes low. So your lautering efficiency is going to be low and your color is going to be high. On top of that, you're starting to see that your wort fermentability is decreasing and you aren't getting to your alcohol level. So now you've got to find which mash vessel temperature probe is understanding temperature, or which steam valve is leaking by. But you don't have any yeast to brew with anyway because somebody forgot to add the sanitizer to your automated yeast brink cleaning system, and now ALL of your yeast has pediococcus in it. Plus, your filter has broken down because your pressure gauge wasn't calibrated properly and you blew out all your seals, and you don't have a spare set of filter screens because your boss wanted to keep below budget and pushed the purchase of new screens until January of the next year so he didn't have to answer to the board of directors.

The fact is that most people have no idea whatsoever how to do anyone's job but their own. Since beer is something that is everywhere, so incredibly varied in style and taste, and there are thousands of blogs about it, people think that because they've had so much exposure to it that they're experts and it must be easy to do. Do you think that building a Ford Focus is easy? They're all over the place, they don't look that complicated, and they're mostly plastic anyway. I can take them to the Jiffy Lube and those jerks can change my oil in 20 minutes! How complicated can building the thing really be? Or what about flying an airplane? They have autopilot do all the work! All they have to do is take off and land, right? And that's all computers too, isn't it?

Brewing is a career. It's not a hobby, or something you can learn by hanging around your local brewpub a lot. There is so much to learn about the craft that it takes a lifetime to learn most of it. I don't care if you don't enjoy light beer. I don't enjoy it either. But I know where it comes from, I know how smart you have to be to make it, and how difficult of a job brewing is at any level. If you don't respect light beer, then just give up on beer altogether. Switch to wine instead. Those idiots have no idea what they're doing anyway. I mean, it's just grapes, right?? 
 
2012-11-02 11:49:46 PM  

MylesHeartVodak: Reposted from another site


The huge brewerys have contributed greatly to brewing science, but they don't make good beer. Light lager is probably the most difficult style to brew, but still not good beer. The people who brew it work very hard and care a lot, but it is still not good beer. Yes, mass produced light lager is an amazing feat of chemical engineering. That does not mean it is good beer.
 
2012-11-03 12:01:52 AM  
I'll be going to Ranger Creek Brewstillery tomorrow to sample everything I can get my hands on. I have the ingredients for an oatmeal stout (mini-mash) and extract Hoegaarden clone to make. Currently have a belgian ale and hefeweizen in the kegerator with one empty keg.
 
2012-11-03 12:03:55 AM  
I just returned from signing the final papers to incorporate my craft brewery so I'm really getting a kick out of this.


/Also has five gallons of saison ready to keg
 
2012-11-03 12:04:56 AM  

poorjon: MylesHeartVodak: Reposted from another site

The huge brewerys have contributed greatly to brewing science, but they don't make good beer. Light lager is probably the most difficult style to brew, but still not good beer. The people who brew it work very hard and care a lot, but it is still not good beer. Yes, mass produced light lager is an amazing feat of chemical engineering. That does not mean it is good beer.


I don't have a dog in this fight. I drink booze, usually vodak. I do enjoy a good brown ale or a stout with a sandwich for lunch, but not to actually drink for recreation. I had to admit that this guy realized that modern craft brews would not exist without the macrobrew industry. Modern microbrew is working on established science from the big boys.
 
2012-11-03 12:15:39 AM  

Communist_Manifesto: The Stealth Hippopotamus: [img841.imageshack.us image 478x640]

Should be bottled on Sunday. But I could do it on Saturday in order to honor HomeBrewing day. It's my tradition to do all my brewing related activities on Sunday.

Hey, you have your religion, I have mine.

Wtf is in the carboy on the left? Are you making orange wine or something?


Apple wine. It browned up nicely. My only guess is the champagne yeast I used had a reaction. Freaked me out for a couple of days.
 
2012-11-03 12:24:22 AM  

GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.


Captain, I am detecting large concentrations of snarkasm in this sector.
 
2012-11-03 12:34:52 AM  

MylesHeartVodak: this guy realized that modern craft brews would not exist without the macrobrew industry.


We have been brewing since the dawn of civilization (some argue that brewing is what lead us to civilization) yet we have only enjoyed a beverage which we would recognize as beer since sometime in the 1800's. This is due almost entirely to the mega-huge breweries. I'm not trying to downplay their contributions to the understanding of of scientific principles underpinning malting, barley and hops genetics and agroscience, water chemistry (the pH scale was invented in the Carlsberg brewing labs), mashing, boiling, fermentation, conditioning, sanitation, yeast propagating and genetics, packaging, and far more. They have given us all of these advances, but they still don't give us very good beer.
 
2012-11-03 01:32:39 AM  
Every time homebrewing comes up, all I can picture is that Breaking Bad episode where everyone is trying Hank's homebrew at a party. Everyone is cringing.
 
2012-11-03 02:53:00 AM  
Well if brewing honey mead counts I will finish off the last of my first ever attempt at mead tomorrow after work and just look longingly at the gallon that is no where near ready yet. It's still bubbling very nicely though. need to try brewing beer some day.
 
2012-11-03 09:41:02 AM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: Honest Bender: Seems there are a lot of homebrew farkers around. Maybe one of you can answer my question:

I've often heard that it's illegal to brew moonshine but I know plenty of people brew their own beer. What gives? Does it become illegal to brew alcohol over a certain proof? Is it a state by state thing? Please help! I'm far FAR too lazy to copy paste this post into Google and click the first link.

/Thanks in advance.

You dont "brew" moonshine. You distill it. The reason they have it illegal is you can possibly make it posionus either using lead solder or pipes, using methanol fermenting ingredients.

It can be dangerous- stills can generat some pressure. Add a leak and an open flame- they can explode.

What it comes down to is avoiding taxes on one of the most highly taxed items you can buy

moonshine is Grain fermented- Distilled- drank cut or uncut. Thats it.


My local homebrew supply sells a mini still. Reading from the box, it says it's so you can distill your own water, but I'm sure it could be used for small shine batches. Probably a liter or two at a time.

poorjon: Since people are interested, here's the cider. My recipes are all for 5 gallon batches, so if you want to do it smaller you'll have to adapt.


That's it. Home brew shop Thursday morning, Farmers market by noon, and I should have a batch started that evening. That sounds delicious. I wouldn't have thought to throw in some of my cinnamon, even though that makes perfectly good sense.
 
kth
2012-11-03 09:47:30 AM  
We won't be able to brew this week, maybe next.

Actually, I'm simply the assistant. The husband is the primary brewer. I'm torn. On the one hand, I'd like him to make me a Rye, but on the other our IPA is really really good, and I'd like to have more of it.

Plus, I'd have to come up with a new name/poem for a Rye.

Because we're nerds, we have names/labels/bad poetry on the labels.

Hip Hop Hooray is our IPA
Lippy Hippy Lager is our Lager
 
2012-11-03 10:01:49 AM  
I won't be brewing since I'm out of town. But as soon as I get home I'm renting a van so I can go and get my new 20 gallon system. Is that relevant? No. But it's awesome and I'm telling everybody.
 
2012-11-03 10:19:37 AM  

kth: Hip Hop Hooray is our IPA


That is brilliant. I want to make my root beer extra foamy, I hear yucca root does the trick, and call it Soggy Bottom Root Beer.
 
2012-11-03 12:20:54 PM  

meat0918: I was planning on it, but then I was told I have to fly to Syracuse, NY for work on Monday, and it's kinda an open ended ticket. I don't want to start a beer without being home to keep an eye on it.. At least they have some decent microbrews in the area.


The regional brews are pretty awesome too - Brown's made a pretty good pumpkin ale this year. There are worse places to be stuck than Syracuse.

/now I want Dinosaur BBQ...
 
2012-11-03 12:27:12 PM  

kth: We won't be able to brew this week, maybe next.

Actually, I'm simply the assistant. The husband is the primary brewer. I'm torn. On the one hand, I'd like him to make me a Rye, but on the other our IPA is really really good, and I'd like to have more of it.

Plus, I'd have to come up with a new name/poem for a Rye.

Because we're nerds, we have names/labels/bad poetry on the labels.

Hip Hop Hooray is our IPA
Lippy Hippy Lager is our Lager


Why not combine them?
I'm bottling a rye ipa today or tomorrow depending on the weather.
 
2012-11-03 01:23:51 PM  
yes, I am at home with a brew...
 
2012-11-03 01:41:42 PM  
Went by my local homebrew place. Was going to do a wheat but saw they had a recipe for one of my favorite beers.
justbeer.files.wordpress.com

So I'll be brewing one of these up.
 
2012-11-03 03:55:18 PM  
I guess I am going to brew today.
 
2012-11-03 04:13:36 PM  

GreenAdder: Modguy: violentsalvation: GreenAdder: That's great.
Really.
Only problem is, why would I spend all my time making beer when Bud Light and Corona are already perfect?
Leave beer-making to the big boys, people.
Leave it to people with centuries of brewing experience.

0/10

I'd give it a 1/10, because it made me laugh.

It takes on a new meaning if you just look at the first letter of each line.


I favorited you for a reason: all your posts are great!
 
kth
2012-11-03 05:53:04 PM  

nw_inferno: kth: We won't be able to brew this week, maybe next.

Actually, I'm simply the assistant. The husband is the primary brewer. I'm torn. On the one hand, I'd like him to make me a Rye, but on the other our IPA is really really good, and I'd like to have more of it.

Plus, I'd have to come up with a new name/poem for a Rye.

Because we're nerds, we have names/labels/bad poetry on the labels.

Hip Hop Hooray is our IPA
Lippy Hippy Lager is our Lager

Why not combine them?
I'm bottling a rye ipa today or tomorrow depending on the weather.



Mmmm... I like both of those things.

We are clearing out the brew room today, and assessing our current stock. We moved this summer and haven't had a chance to unpack everything (crazy jobs, couple of injuries, ill parents), so we're finally getting our asses in gear. Our new house has a room without a daylight window, so it isn't usable for much. We're making it into the beer/cheese room.
 
2012-11-03 06:07:38 PM  

Amberwind: My husband loves to listen to homebrewing podcasts, but we only just moved into a house where we have space for brewing a couple weeks ago. Perhaps I'll kick him into starting something in the kitschy Mr. Beer kit I got him as a joke a couple years ago until we're unpacked enough to set up for proper brewing.

/I hate beer.


I started out on a mr. beer kit.. now I brew for a living.

good luck with your home brews everyone! It's beer week in town for me, and I'll be entertaining all the mucky mucks and working festivals and what not. big winter seasonal release weekend..
this years Barley wine, triple, quad winter white ( Belgium wit,or, triple litet ) chocolate porter ( for desert.) wee heavy, wiezen bock.

vertical flights of barley wine, triple and quad going back three years...
not to mention all the cask firkins and pins.

got to see the Red Elvis's and get snookered on the company dime last night!

and maryland farkers, as of last week we are officially in the greater Baltimore metro area
 
2012-11-03 06:21:16 PM  

poorjon: MylesHeartVodak: this guy realized that modern craft brews would not exist without the macrobrew industry.

We have been brewing since the dawn of civilization (some argue that brewing is what lead us to civilization) yet we have only enjoyed a beverage which we would recognize as beer since sometime in the 1800's. This is due almost entirely to the mega-huge breweries. I'm not trying to downplay their contributions to the understanding of of scientific principles underpinning malting, barley and hops genetics and agroscience, water chemistry (the pH scale was invented in the Carlsberg brewing labs), mashing, boiling, fermentation, conditioning, sanitation, yeast propagating and genetics, packaging, and far more. They have given us all of these advances, but they still don't give us very good beer.


you left out the part about Pasteurization... Pasteur was working for the brewing industry when he came up with the process.

every micro brewery owes it to themselves to look up to, an try as best to emulate the practices of the macro's, we have a lot to learn from them..

they can make great beers on giant scales, but that is not the business model. sure, AB makes a mediocre product, but they make a lot of it, hectoliters scale, consistently, every time.all around the WORLD QA with the them is second to none. and Budweiser doesn't win awards in the festivals because it is used as the calibration beer for the American lager style. in that regard, it is beyond awards and medals.
if big bud wanted me, I would be hard pressed to turn them down, they only hire the best of the best, and pay them accordingly.

sure, the brew towers in a typical bud plant looks like an air traffic control tower, but when you are dealing with that amount of material you NEED a great deal of automation.
 
2012-11-05 03:34:24 PM  
I don't like the notion that all light lagers are crap, based on Bud/Miller/Coors. I brew and drink light (all malt) German style lagers all the time. They actually taste good, and are sessionable. The whole "light beer sucks" mentality usually comes from a beginner trying to sound like they are a connoiseur.

Anyway, bottled half a batch of American Pale this past weekend, kegging the other 5.5 gallons tonight. Also making yeast starters for a German Traditional Bock brew scheduled this weekend. Just finished off my Munich Helles, so a Pilsner might be the next lager after the Bock. Robust porter is the next ale...thinking maybe a bourbon porter?


glad to see Cerebral Knievel in here *waves*
 
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