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(Mother Jones)   Do the crime, and you'll never vote again: Mother Jones is upset that felon disenfranchisement means President Obama is missing out on the felon vote   (motherjones.com) divider line 173
    More: Asinine, Obama administration, Mother Jones, disfranchisements, swing states, voting ages, Prison Policy Initiative  
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761 clicks; posted to Politics » on 02 Nov 2012 at 12:34 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



173 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-11-02 10:18:59 AM  
I didn't think it was a lifetime ban, only while you are serving your sentence? It varies from state to state and the trend is less restrictions on felony voters.
 
2012-11-02 10:34:11 AM  

vernonFL: It varies from state to state and the trend is less restrictions on felony voters.


I think certain felonies make you permanently ineligible for certain rights/privileges (e.g. owning a firearm), though in some cases you may petition to have your rights restored.
 
2012-11-02 10:45:18 AM  

vernonFL: I didn't think it was a lifetime ban, only while you are serving your sentence? It varies from state to state and the trend is less restrictions on felony voters.


According to wiki their is still a lifetime ban in Kentucky and Virginia Link

And of course Florida wants to make it harder to for felons to vote Link
 
2012-11-02 10:49:10 AM  
Unless your felony involves Crimea pertaining to elections, I don't think any felony should have any impact upon one's right to vote. There are far too many ways to rig the system and disproportionately target certain demographics. See, eg, drug laws.
 
2012-11-02 10:52:47 AM  
I support the loss of voting privileges while a sentence is in effect, i.e. while in prison or on probation/parole. One thing our constitution is rather clear on is that imprisonment is a reason for a removal of certain rights.
 
2012-11-02 11:02:58 AM  
We should remove the right to vote from felons, and as Florida does, from people with similar names as felons.
 
2012-11-02 11:07:28 AM  

kronicfeld: Unless your felony involves Crimea pertaining to elections, I don't think any felony should have any impact upon one's right to vote.



i105.photobucket.com

What Crimea might look like.
 
2012-11-02 11:14:52 AM  
I used to think a ban on felons made sense, until we started lowering the bar on what constitutes a felony.
 
2012-11-02 11:20:15 AM  

FloydA: kronicfeld: Unless your felony involves Crimea pertaining to elections, I don't think any felony should have any impact upon one's right to vote.


[i105.photobucket.com image 460x327]

What Crimea might look like.


Near the Crimea River.
 
2012-11-02 11:20:40 AM  
I'm ok with this
 
2012-11-02 11:21:43 AM  

vernonFL: I didn't think it was a lifetime ban, only while you are serving your sentence? It varies from state to state and the trend is less restrictions on felony voters.


I think all felons should get to vote. Perhaps not while the are on probation/parole but certainly after they served all their time.
 
2012-11-02 11:24:29 AM  

I_Am_Weasel: Near the Crimea River.


Groan...
 
2012-11-02 11:28:37 AM  

I_Am_Weasel: FloydA: kronicfeld: Unless your felony involves Crimea pertaining to elections, I don't think any felony should have any impact upon one's right to vote.


[i105.photobucket.com image 460x327]

What Crimea might look like.

Near the Crimea River.


i105.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-02 11:32:43 AM  
There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.
 
2012-11-02 11:43:24 AM  
Blah people problems.
 
2012-11-02 11:43:58 AM  
As mentioned before, this is literally one of those things that varies from state ot state. In Indiana, for example, a person who is incarcerated or otherwise serving a sentence is not eligible to vote. There has been very little litigation over the concept of whether a person on work release, home detention, or probation falls under that "or otherwise serving a sentence" catch-all, probably because folks who tend to commit crimes also seem to be less likely to vote in the first place.

I do agree that universal disenfranchisement for a criminal conviction goes against the spirit of what this country stands for.
 
2012-11-02 11:44:57 AM  

GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.


Even the right to own a firearm?
 
2012-11-02 11:46:55 AM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: I'm ok with this


What a surprise
 
2012-11-02 11:49:22 AM  

Jackson Herring: GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.

Even the right to own a firearm?


Yes, public safety is exactly the same thing as voting. I'm not playing apples to potato.
 
2012-11-02 11:50:25 AM  
This is one of the problems with having a voter base that is disproportionately likely to be a felon.
 
2012-11-02 12:15:23 PM  

Jackson Herring: GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.

Even the right to own a firearm?


Way to stir shiat up. LOL.
 
2012-11-02 12:20:24 PM  

GAT_00: Jackson Herring: GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.

Even the right to own a firearm?

Yes, public safety is exactly the same thing as voting. I'm not playing apples to potato.


Votes can't impact public safety?

I think you're just playing with potatoes too much in general...
 
2012-11-02 12:26:58 PM  

GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.


Damn right. People should be free to commit felonies without fear of long term repercussions. I'm thinking of having business cards made--is the proper term "Felon Rights Activist" or "Felons' Rights Activist"?
 
2012-11-02 12:31:47 PM  

CreamFilling: GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.

Damn right. People should be free to commit felonies without fear of long term repercussions. I'm thinking of having business cards made--is the proper term "Felon Rights Activist" or "Felons' Rights Activist"?


I think "Bleeding Heart Moron" would cover it. That way you can join other libtard causes without having to print more cards.
 
2012-11-02 12:35:16 PM  
Just another attempt to block minority voters.
 
2012-11-02 12:35:54 PM  
It wasn't a problem until they outlawed everything so now everybody is a future convicted felon.
 
2012-11-02 12:36:45 PM  

Silly Jesus: This is one of the problems with having a voter base that is disproportionately likely to be a felon.


Mitt Romneys base would be felons as well, if stealing billions of dollars carried a harsher penalty than smoking a joint.
 
2012-11-02 12:37:11 PM  
I just wanted to say that Mother Jones is a stupid name for a magazine.
 
2012-11-02 12:38:25 PM  

GAT_00: There is no reason, none, that people should suffer permanent punishment after their sentence has been carried out.


So, a temporary suspension of certain rights is ok?
 
2012-11-02 12:38:39 PM  
While we're at it, they should have the same access to guns that everyone else has.
 
2012-11-02 12:39:43 PM  
When someone finishes 'paying their debt to society' - jail time, probation, and paying all fees and fines - they should have their voting rights restored. Ex-cons are disenfranchised enough. Taking their right to vote away only serves to make them feel less able to reenter society and might increase recidivism.
 
2012-11-02 12:40:50 PM  
Why do they do this anyway? Is it supposed to ba e punishment? Because I would totally consider robbing my neighbor if only they didn't take away my right to vote afterwards.

Protip: Most people who are convicted felons probably won't vote even if you let them.
 
2012-11-02 12:40:54 PM  
Gee, i wonder why a prison population would be automatically voting for Obama...
 
2012-11-02 12:41:03 PM  
Don't commit felonies if your right to vote is important to you.
 
2012-11-02 12:41:39 PM  
In a state like Georgia where everything is a felony, this is a big deal. What about California? Can convicted felon Darrell Issa vote? I mean besides voting no on 300 new state department security positions?
 
2012-11-02 12:41:40 PM  

cynispasm: Just another attempt to block minority voters.



For more on the topic...

1.bp.blogspot.com

This is what I tell people when they say the drug laws don't work. No, they don't work at keeping drugs off the streets, but they work pretty damn well at doing other things . Not a huge coincidence that the War on Drugs and escalated felony drug sentencing took place right after the Civil Rights Movement.
 
2012-11-02 12:41:42 PM  

Silly Jesus: This is one of the problems with having a voter base that is disproportionately likely to be a felon.


No doubt a lot fewer Republicans are felons. But the ones that are (Oliver North, Bernie Madoff, Jeff Skilling, just to pick three of the most sterling examples) are real doozies.
 
2012-11-02 12:42:52 PM  

vernonFL: I didn't think it was a lifetime ban, only while you are serving your sentence? It varies from state to state and the trend is less restrictions on felony voters.


In Florida, it might as well be a lifetime ban. The governor has to personally restore your voting rights. most recent Florida governors haven't been known for their compassion towards anyone other than white business owners.

I honestly don't understand the reasoning on disenfranchising people who are legally allowed to join society, even ex-felons.
 
2012-11-02 12:43:07 PM  

LemSkroob: Gee, i wonder why a prison population would be automatically voting for Obama...


Because they're mostly poor, for one thing.
 
2012-11-02 12:43:26 PM  
But you can still be a senator. That's fine. Makes sense.
 
2012-11-02 12:44:00 PM  
When does Tom Delay get to vote again?
 
2012-11-02 12:44:00 PM  
I'm not really sure what the issue is, you break the social contract yo... oh. I get it. Mother Jones sees the telltale signs of "racism" here.

Maybe they could stop seeing nonexistent problems, and focus on real issues like unemployment and housing? local government spending? poorly maintained useful public infrastructure?
 
2012-11-02 12:44:24 PM  

LemSkroob: Gee, i wonder why a prison population would be automatically voting for Obama...


Because most of them know that people like Romney create the laws that put them there.
 
2012-11-02 12:45:00 PM  

GAT_00: I'm not playing apples to potato.


You're just going to stick to potato, then.

Noble.
 
2012-11-02 12:45:54 PM  
Virginia resident here. There is a way for people convicted of felonies to get their voting rights restored after completing their sentence. Yeah, there's paperwork and a few phone calls involved. But it's nowhere near as harsh as everyone here seems to think it is.

The rules:

If you have lost the right to vote as a result of a felony conviction in a Virginia court, a U.S. District or a military court, you must have your rights restored in order to qualify for voter registration. The restoration of rights restores the rights to vote, to run for and hold public office, to serve on juries and to serve as a notary public. It does not include the right to possess or transport any firearm or to carry a concealed weapon.

In order to be eligible for restoration of rights by the Governor, an applicant must:

*Must be a resident of Virginia, and/or have been convicted of a felony in a Virginia court, a U.S. District court or a military court
*be free from any sentence served or supervised probation and parole for a minimum of two years for a non-violent offense or five years for a violent felony or drug distribution, drug manufacturing offense, any crimes against a minor, or an election law offense.
*have paid all court costs, fines, penalties and restitution and have no felony or misdemeanor charges pending.
*not have had a DWI in the five years immediately preceding the application.
*Not have any misdemeanor convictions and/or pending criminal charges 2 years preceding the application for non-violent felonies or five years for a violent felony or drug distribution, drug manufacturing offense, any crimes against a minor, or an election law offense.

You can download the appropriate application below and, when completed, mail it to this office. Or, if you prefer, we'll send you a form if you provide a mailing address. On your application, be sure to provide the specific offense(s) and the exact date(s) of sentencing. If you do not have this information, you can get it by requesting a Criminal History Record through the Virginia State Police at (804) 674-6718 or online at their website, www.vsp.state.va.us.

The Secretary of the Commonwealth Office will conduct a criminal history and DMV record check on all applicants. Petitioners will be sent notice of the Governor's decision within 60 days from the time an application is considered complete.


/seems reasonable to me
 
2012-11-02 12:45:58 PM  

Silly Jesus: This is one of the problems with having a voter base that is disproportionately likely to be a felon.


And one of the reasons they're disproportionally likely to be felons is because of drug laws specifically targeted to make them felons.

ie. 500:1 Sentencing penalty ratio for crack cocaine vs. powder cocaine.
 
2012-11-02 12:46:31 PM  
What's this? Virtually all drug crimes are felonies? Over a third of all felons are incarcerated for drug crimes, almost twice as many as violent crimes? And black people are incarcerated for drug crimes at a rate as much as 50 times higher than whites? There are twice as many minority felons as white felons? And you don't want to let felons vote, EVER, even after they serve their time?

Well, nothing to see here.
 
2012-11-02 12:46:45 PM  

Inaditch: I just wanted to say that Mother Jones is a stupid name for a magazine.


Do you not know who Mother Jones was, or do you know and not care?
 
2012-11-02 12:47:05 PM  
The fact that felons would overwhelmingly vote Democratic if given the opportunity is reason enough for me to ALWAYS vote Republican. Really Dems? These are the people you identify and agree with?
 
2012-11-02 12:47:51 PM  

RumsfeldsReplacement: The fact that felons would overwhelmingly vote Democratic if given the opportunity is reason enough for me to ALWAYS vote Republican. Really Dems? These are the people you identify and agree with?


Citations needed
 
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