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(The Atlantic)   Inevitable Natural Disaster Consequence #4: Beautiful high-resolution images of destruction and despair in the aftermath of Sandy   (theatlantic.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Teterboro Airport, Con Edison  
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16592 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Nov 2012 at 12:55 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-02 12:15:18 PM  
Pic I took yesterday of people on line at Wawa in Tinton Falls, NJ. There were at least 150 on line just to fill gas cans. Car line for gas stretched at least a 1/2 mile.

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2012-11-02 12:56:59 PM  
***sad piano music***

Oh, the flooded underpasses!
Never forget!
 
2012-11-02 01:03:24 PM  
sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net
 
2012-11-02 01:04:11 PM  
Yea these actually show the damage... Watching the news here they are only showing kids trick or treating with flashlights or people with flooded basements. Meanwhile there are people who have had their homes completely destroyed.
 
2012-11-02 01:04:51 PM  
I kind of laughed at the football field with debris on it. You wonder if whoever compiled the pictures had a bone to pick about that one
 
2012-11-02 01:06:03 PM  
What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.
 
2012-11-02 01:06:14 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com

The mailman probably thinks he has a day off now.
 
2012-11-02 01:07:37 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com
Isn't this how horror movies begin?
 
2012-11-02 01:09:58 PM  

GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.


That is what I was thinking. Cans of food and soda that have gotten wet are still good. The toilet paper doesn't look soggy and wet? Maybe they have extreme liability issues...
 
2012-11-02 01:10:53 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com

I think it's time for some photoshoping.
 
2012-11-02 01:17:02 PM  

texdent: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 850x556]

The mailman probably thinks he has a day off now.


Yeah, I wouldn't want to wade through gaso-water either.
 
2012-11-02 01:17:43 PM  
i.imgur.com

/raises a toast to the resiliency of New Yorkers.
 
2012-11-02 01:19:07 PM  

GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.


Did the seal break? That's the question. Oh but what if it's only one or two jars out of thousands... yeah have fun checking them all to see if the seal's "likely" intact.

Better to just toss it all for safety's sake.
 
2012-11-02 01:19:33 PM  
Relax. You see anyone complaining?

In Jersey, this is an improvement.
 
2012-11-02 01:20:53 PM  
I'd be more than happy to take a few cart loads of that "contaminated" canned food they were destroying. A little bleach and water and a magic marker to re-label the contents is all I need.
 
2012-11-02 01:25:19 PM  
Shocking that all those people living within yards of the ocean got damage and destruction when a major storm blew through.

Shocking.
 
2012-11-02 01:25:58 PM  

spidermilk: GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.

That is what I was thinking. Cans of food and soda that have gotten wet are still good. The toilet paper doesn't look soggy and wet? Maybe they have extreme liability issues...


They would probably have to sterilize all of those before they could be sold. For jars and bottles, that would be nearly impossible, since you'd have to find a way to clean between the lid/top and the container (between the screw ridges), without opening the container or destroying the contents. Most labels are paper-based, so they'd be garbage, and I doubt you sell the product without the label.
 
2012-11-02 01:26:13 PM  
The supermarket food is still probably usable, but definitely not sellable. The flood water had gas and oil and all manner of crazy crap in it. The food inside is fine buys the outside could have God knows what on it and piercing a can with an opener pushes whatever's on the outside in. People could sanitize them, but they won't and a soup kitchen has other things to worry about. Probably just the most logical thing to do is throw it out at this point.
 
2012-11-02 01:26:58 PM  
Living in hurricane alley, I find no shock in these pictures, just shake my head and think buy gas beforehand!
 
2012-11-02 01:28:26 PM  

GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.


They have been issues with sewer water coming to the surface.

So they could be worried that sewer water washed over the glass jars. No matter how well you wash the outside, who wants to eat something from a jar that came into contact with sewer water? And the financial risk of getting sued if someone get eccoli is not worth it.
 
2012-11-02 01:29:53 PM  
the roller coaster one makes me think of the one from the opening of Step By Step, always thought that Step By Step one was odd having a roller coaster on the beech.
 
2012-11-02 01:30:08 PM  
Man, that is seriously effed up

'Course I live on top of the world's largest active caldera. When it goes there won't be any posing afterwards.
 
2012-11-02 01:30:13 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com

This pisses me off. I'm sure that there are shelters that could have used a lot of this stuff. It's not that hard to figure out if seals on jars are good, the top pops. There are a lot of canned drinks and bottled drinks as well and even some beer. Where's Lootie when you need him?
 
2012-11-02 01:30:49 PM  
Number 22 with the lonely bumper car, needs to be photoshopped.

/he looks sad :(
 
2012-11-02 01:32:53 PM  

thornhill: GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.

They have been issues with sewer water coming to the surface.

So they could be worried that sewer water washed over the glass jars. No matter how well you wash the outside, who wants to eat something from a jar that came into contact with sewer water? And the financial risk of getting sued if someone get eccoli is not worth it.


Yeah, you don't want to walk around in urban flood waters unless you're wearing a rental drysuit.

RENTAL.
 
2012-11-02 01:33:00 PM  

stevenvictx: Living in hurricane alley, I find no shock in these pictures, just shake my head and think buy gas beforehand!


I grew up in sw La. and although I moved away many years ago, I still have family and friends who still live there. Although I don't wish these kinds of things on anyone, I don't find anything shocking about what I see either. The earth does these kinds of things and if you are in the way... you lose.
 
2012-11-02 01:33:06 PM  
What I, as a resident of flyover country, can't help but notice is how close together, in general, all these houses are. Even the rich folks' homes. It's the clearest difference I see between destruction there and destruction on the Gulf Coast.
 
2012-11-02 01:34:50 PM  

CJHardin: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 850x560]

This pisses me off. I'm sure that there are shelters that could have used a lot of this stuff. It's not that hard to figure out if seals on jars are good, the top pops. There are a lot of canned drinks and bottled drinks as well and even some beer. Where's Lootie when you need him?


Bingo
 
2012-11-02 01:34:57 PM  

CJHardin: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 850x560]

This pisses me off. I'm sure that there are shelters that could have used a lot of this stuff. It's not that hard to figure out if seals on jars are good, the top pops. There are a lot of canned drinks and bottled drinks as well and even some beer. Where's Lootie when you need him?


Do you know how I know you didn't read the thread?
 
2012-11-02 01:42:53 PM  

thornhill: GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.

They have been issues with sewer water coming to the surface.

So they could be worried that sewer water washed over the glass jars. No matter how well you wash the outside, who wants to eat something from a jar that came into contact with sewer water? And the financial risk of getting sued if someone get eccoli is not worth it.


I understand the liability issues and realize that if they expect to get reimbursed for the product by their insurance company they HAVE to toss it but seriously, "who wants to eat something out of a jar that came into contact with sewer water?".

I suppose maybe people that don't understand how vacuum sealed glass containers and cans work?

Seriously. It touched nasty water. It's sealed. Liability aside (this is America, after all), you're more likely to get ill cracking an egg you just bought while making a nice cake than from eating something out of one of those undamaged glass jars or cans. You will note that I did not suggest you lick the outside of the container or anything..

That said, the overwhelming majority of stuff in a supermarket that's been flooded is totally unusable.

Ermagherd durrt.
 
2012-11-02 01:43:13 PM  
Well they are throwing out unbroken lightbulbs too. I get why they have to throw it out; to be safe they are probably assuming everything in the store is not usable and their insurance will replace their entire inventory.

Even if throwing it out is what they have to do, that does not make it feel less wasteful. If I was the editor, I wouldn't include it in the photos because the other photos show what we have lost and this photo shows that food is still so plentiful that we can still out food that is probably perfectly good.
 
2012-11-02 01:43:19 PM  
I tried this with a "no change in the appearance of Hoboken" in the headline.
 
2012-11-02 01:43:53 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com

"Haha, all of your boats on my lawn are all mine now."
 
2012-11-02 01:45:57 PM  

literaldeluxe: spidermilk: GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.

That is what I was thinking. Cans of food and soda that have gotten wet are still good. The toilet paper doesn't look soggy and wet? Maybe they have extreme liability issues...

They would probably have to sterilize all of those before they could be sold. For jars and bottles, that would be nearly impossible, since you'd have to find a way to clean between the lid/top and the container (between the screw ridges), without opening the container or destroying the contents. Most labels are paper-based, so they'd be garbage, and I doubt you sell the product without the label.


Also, in case you have never canned something when you do it at home you boil the jars to sterilize and seal them. So to say you can't sterilize them sounds a little silly to me.
 
2012-11-02 01:47:09 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com

THESE BOATSES ARE MINES! I FOUNDS THEM I DID!
 
2012-11-02 01:53:04 PM  
Oh, why not?

i.imgur.com

Go back to the marina, boats, you are drunk.
 
2012-11-02 01:56:07 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com
Looks like I don't need a bigger boat
 
2012-11-02 01:57:24 PM  

texdent: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 850x559]
Isn't this how horror movies begin?


Yup. They thought they got all the mosquitoes born from the NYC subway but they were wrong.

/Contagion 2: Sceptic Bugaboo - coming next summer
 
2012-11-02 01:58:53 PM  
I participate in a food co-operative, and we get all kinds of damaged goods all the time. If you're that friggin worried about liability, make anybody that wants to grab some goodies sign a waiver. It's not rocket surgery.
 
2012-11-02 02:02:49 PM  
As long as your photos don't have a Brazilian model in them...
 
2012-11-02 02:03:03 PM  
when the East Coast pays as much for gas as we in Calif pay, maybe I'll have some sympathy, maybe
 
2012-11-02 02:03:27 PM  

Anne.Uumellmahaye: The supermarket food is still probably usable, but definitely not sellable. The flood water had gas and oil and all manner of crazy crap in it.


SURE, blame Taco Bell for everything... geeez.


This will surely draw some hate replies, but I went 10 1/2 days after the derecho with no power. No warning (ZERO) vs a week's warning and MANDATORY evacuation warnings.
Zero communications; no power, no TV, no cell or home phones, no radio stations worked and when the 1st finally came back on it was NOTHING but an advertisement added for the power company doing what they could for their customers EVERY damned break (one of the computer controlled/no DJ radio stations). 1st news I got was about 2 days later when I finally started getting a cell signal, barely, and I had went and got my mother (also without power); had her call her friend that lives outside Boston; took 3 calls since kept getting cut off, but finally got some 'news' as to how bad it was.
Temperatures were in triple digits, day after day... by the second day I was outside in my boxers and I could care less (and dared anyone to stop by and say one word about it). Gas was impossible to get since there wasn't any power for the stations, then when some of the stations DID finally get some power, they couldn't sell gas or even food since their computerized registers were linked to the "home office" and they still could not communicate with them. Literally could not buy a bag of chips.
As for them freezing to death; I read that this morning around 5 or 5:30 am and checked the Weather Channel - it said 47° How are you going to freeze to death in that weather?? It was only 38° here yesterday morning and I was out flushing/back flushing my heater core repeatedly to 'burp' the coolant system in my truck and getting soaked, in a t-shirt and hoodie (actually just checked a while ago and right arm of hoodie is still wet).

People with homes destroyed is one thing.. people coming out of their homes or apts on the second day screaming they are freezing to death and starving are completely full of shiat! Just wait until you have to go a little over TEN days (plus put up with random power outages for 2 more months+ - up to 4 times a day)! Oh, and try sleeping in a house that is around 120°

As for not seeing all the help... when we finally got some news, all we heard was about tractor trailers full of ice coming in.. multiple loads.. here they come! Never saw a single one of them - ever.

/seriously, who the hell doesn't keep more than one day's worth of food on hand?!? And, as stevenvictx said, with a week's advanced notice, they couldn't take a few minutes and gas up??
//evil rant/CSB over
///time for a nice hot cup of coffee; E. coli-free
 
2012-11-02 02:04:27 PM  

Dinjiin: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 400x270]

"Haha, all of your boats on my lawn are all mine now."


See, we were warned what would happen if didn't stop playing with your boats in old man Dinjiin's yard!
 
2012-11-02 02:04:44 PM  
cdn.theatlantic.com

Someone left the boat magnet on "full power" when they evacuated.
 
2012-11-02 02:07:48 PM  
Wow, just plain ole wow. We're gonna need a 'heineken man' shooop in there somewhere.
 
2012-11-02 02:09:46 PM  

TheMega: No warning (ZERO)


I am in SE Ohio and we got maybe an hours worth of warning for that damn thing. Granted, we were lucky that our power came back on after 5 hours (my parents had no power for over a week).
 
2012-11-02 02:10:43 PM  

stevenvictx: Living in hurricane alley, I find no shock in these pictures, just shake my head and think buy gas beforehand!


This storm was truly unprecedented for NYC. We were unprepared because we didn't believe it could be this bad.
 
2012-11-02 02:12:28 PM  

Ego edo infantia cattus: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 850x558]

I think it's time for some photoshoping.


i1297.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-02 02:13:18 PM  
Cat 2?

Hell, we don't even bring in the dogs down here for one of *those*.
 
2012-11-02 02:14:30 PM  

spidermilk: GoldDude: What a waste, and probably an insurance scam too on the disposal of food items at the supermarket.
Sure, anything that the water could actually infiltrate should be chucked for safety.
But I see a lot of sealed jars in those piles. Seems to me that glass is reasonably impermeable.

That is what I was thinking. Cans of food and soda that have gotten wet are still good. The toilet paper doesn't look soggy and wet? Maybe they have extreme liability issues...



Yeah, I think it's just that the risk is non-zero, and they already paid their premiums, so why try to sell? Especially with the sewage issue - did some small amount of bacteria sneak into a cavity in the cap-lip zone, just waiting for a chance to get into the food?
Hell, there might even be some kind of regulation set down by the Grocers' Association of America (or whatever such an organization might be called) to not sell any flood-damaged goods (probably applies to things like accidental sprinkler discharge, too).
 
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