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(Wired)   How the US Army is 'Unwatering' New York City   (wired.com) divider line 58
    More: Interesting, Southern California Edison, Army Corps of Engineers, Craig Fugate, Shelter allowance, Air National Guard, Con Edison, tunnels, military engineers  
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7645 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Nov 2012 at 11:41 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-02 09:14:39 PM

Firethorn: Though with all their talk of moving equipment around, I'm kind of surprised that they don't have dedicated pump spots to clear the water out. I can understand that the usual sump spots are way underwater at the moment and are overwhelmed to boot, but I'd think it'd be fairly simple to have some spots that are basically 'stick a pump here, let it work'.


You can only use suction to pull water something like 35 feet up a hose on the earths surface and I believe that requires a perfect vacuum. Chances are they keep having to move the pumps because the pumps keep running into the point where they can no longer draw water up the hose (not sure how deep the tunnels are). That's why they're trying to get in submersible pumps, because they can keep pushing water up as long as the pump can stand the water pressure at the discharge hose. That's what it sounds like to me anyway.
 
2012-11-02 11:08:54 PM
I like how they quote the guy as saying "dewatering", and then keep saying "unwatering". Why make up a stupid word when the real word is right there in your quote?
 
2012-11-02 11:31:01 PM

Korzine: You can only use suction to pull water something like 35 feet up a hose on the earths surface and I believe that requires a perfect vacuum. Chances are they keep having to move the pumps because the pumps keep running into the point where they can no longer draw water up the hose (not sure how deep the tunnels are). That's why they're trying to get in submersible pumps, because they can keep pushing water up as long as the pump can stand the water pressure at the discharge hose. That's what it sounds like to me anyway.


From the article, they're getting both types of pumps brought in. I was thinking about some sort of fancy elevator shaft thing - for submersibles you simply drop it in the water as deep as you need to, you have the centrifuge types 'float'.
 
2012-11-03 12:29:15 AM
Has Duke been contacted yet?
 
2012-11-03 04:30:39 AM
I could see it taking some time. Having to stop the pumping every time a homeless person or C.H.U.D. gets sucked up against the pump hose nozzle.
 
2012-11-03 08:43:04 AM
My dad works industrial clean-up in Detroit and is in New York with his scary monster vac truck right now.

/CSS
 
2012-11-03 08:07:41 PM
So where have all the rats gone?
 
2012-11-05 10:36:59 AM

forstmeister: Dwight_Yeast: forstmeister: Not only that, but they are deisgned to hook up to a hydrant, thereby creating a vacuum. Most fire trucks don't have the ability to just stick a hose in a pond as far as I know.

Some rural fire depts still have pumper trucks that can do exactly that, as they're designed to put out farmhouse or barn fires where the only source of water is the nearest pond.

Ah, very good point. I hadn't thought of that actually. I don't think NYC has any rural fire trucks lying around?


Does a firetruck develop enough head (giggity) to pump (giggity) from the middle of a tunnel all the way back out to the harbor?
 
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