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(The Sun)   News: Woman heals self of incurable disease. Fark: By eating tree bark (w/pic of woman, tree)   (thesun.co.uk) divider line 14
    More: Sappy, Crohn's disease, St. Thomas  
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14062 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Nov 2012 at 2:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2012-11-02 03:06:52 AM
3 votes:
Congratulations, you've discovered aspirin!
2012-11-02 02:56:21 AM
3 votes:
Sappy. Trees. Don't think that slipped past us, Subby.
2012-11-02 06:38:24 AM
2 votes:

OhioUGrad: ...and doesn't have the side effects


It's a pharmacoactive substance. It will have side effects.

Insomnia
Vivid Dreams/Night Terrors
Weight Gain
Irritability
Nausea/Vomiting
GI Upset
Dry Mouth
Headache
Diarrhea
Numbness/tingling

It also sensitizes your skin to the sun and makes you burn easy.

It can worsen ADHD, Bipolar Syndrome, Major Clinical Depression, Alzheimers Disease, and makes those little swimmy things in your balls really unhappy.

Alprazolam (Xanax) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Alprazolam (Xanax) is commonly used for anxiety. The body breaks down alprazolam (Xanax) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how fast the body gets rid of alprazolam (Xanax). Taking St. John's wort along with alprazolam (Xanax) might decrease the effectiveness of alprazolam (Xanax).

Aminolevulinic acid interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Aminolevulinic acid can make your skin sensitive to the sunlight. St. John's wort might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking St. John's wort along with aminolevulinic acid might increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.

Amitriptyline (Elavil) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down amitriptyline (Elavil) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body gets rid of some medications. St. John's wort might decrease the effectiveness of amitriptyline (Elavil) by increasing how quickly the body breaks down amitriptyline (Elavil).

Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some birth control pills contain estrogen. The body breaks down the estrogen in birth control pills to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase the break down of estrogen. Taking St. John's wort along with birth control pills might decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. If you take birth control pills along with St. John's wort, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom.

Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.

Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). By increasing the breakdown of cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) St. John's wort might decrease the effectiveness of cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune).

Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Digoxin (Lanoxin) helps the heart beat more strongly. St. John's wort might decrease how much digoxin (Lanoxin) the body absorbs. By decreasing how much digoxin (Lanoxin) the body absorbs St. John's wort might decrease the effects of digoxin (Lanoxin).

Fenfluramine (Pondimin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Fenfluramine (Pondimin) increases a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort also increases serotonin. Taking fenfluramine with St. John's wort might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, nausea, headache, and anxiety.

Imatinib (Gleevec) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down imatinib to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body gets rid of imatinib (Gleevec). Taking St. John's wort along with imatinib (Gleevec) might decrease the effectiveness of imatinib (Gleevec). Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking imatinib (Gleevec).

Irinotecan (Camptosar) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Irinotecan (Camptosar) is used to treat cancer. The body breaks down irinotecan (Camptosar) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how fast the body breaks down irinotecan (Camptosar) and decrease the effectiveness of irinotecan (Camptosar).

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking St. John's wort along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can decrease the effectiveness of some medications. Before taking St. John's wort talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

Medications for depression (Antidepressant drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort increases a brain chemical called serotonin. Some medications for depression also increase the brain chemical serotonin. Taking St. John's wort along with these medications for depression might increase serotonin too much and cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking medications for depression.

Some of these medications for depression include fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), amitriptyline (Elavil), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Tofranil), and others.

Medications for HIV/AIDS (Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs)) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down medications used for HIV/AIDS. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body breaks down these medications. Taking St. John's wort might decrease how well some medications used for HIV/AIDS work.

Some of these medications used for HIV/AIDS include nevirapine (Viramune), delavirdine (Rescriptor), and efavirenz (Sustiva).

Medications for HIV/AIDS (Protease Inhibitors) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down medications used for HIV/AIDS to get rid of them. Taking St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down these medications. This could decrease the effectiveness of some medications used for HIV/AIDS.

Some of these medications used for HIV/AIDS include amprenavir (Agenerase), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase).

Medications for pain (Narcotic drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down some medications for pain to get rid of them. St. John's Wort might decrease how fast the body gets rid of some medications for pain. By decreasing how fast the body gets rid of some medications for pain, St. John's wort might increase the effects and side effects of some medications for pain.

Some medications for pain include meperidine (Demerol), hydrocodone, morphine, OxyContin, and many others.

Medications moved by pumps in cells (P-Glycoprotein Substrates) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. St. John's wort can make these pumps more active and decrease how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. This might decrease the effectiveness of some medications.

Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.

Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. St. John's Wort might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking St. John's wort along with medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.

Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

Meperidine (Demerol) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort increases a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Meperidine (Demerol) can also increase serotonin in the brain. Taking St. John's wort along with meperidine (Demerol) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety.

Nefazodone (Serzone) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Nefazodone can increase a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort can also increase serotonin. Taking St. John's wort with nefazodone might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could lead to serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and restlessness.

Nortriptyline (Pamelor) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down nortriptyline (Pamelor) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body breaks down nortriptyline (Pamelor). This could decrease the effectiveness of nortriptyline (Pamelor).

Paroxetine (Paxil) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Paroxetine (Paxil) increases a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort also increases serotonin. Taking paroxetine (Paxil) and St. John's wort together might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could lead to serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and weakness.

Pentazocine (Talwin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort increases a brain chemical called serotonin. Pentazocine (Talwin) also increases serotonin. Taking St. John's wort along with pentazocine (Talwin) might increase serotonin too much. This could cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking pentazocine (Talwin).

Phenobarbital (Luminal) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down phenobarbital (Luminal) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenobarbital. This could decrease how well phenobarbital works.

Phenprocoumon interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down phenprocoumon to get rid of it. St. John's wort increases how quickly the body breaks down phenprocoumon. This decreases the effectiveness of phenprocoumon.

Phenytoin (Dilantin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenytoin. Taking St. John's wort and taking phenytoin (Dilantin) might decrease the effectiveness of phenytoin (Dilantin) and increase the possibility of seizures.

Reserpine interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort can decrease the effects of reserpine.

Sedative medications (Barbiturates) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Medications that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedatives. St. John's wort might decrease the effectiveness of sedative medications. It is not clear why this interaction occurs.

Sertraline (Zoloft) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Sertraline (Zoloft) can increase a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort also increases serotonin. This can cause there to be too much serotonin in the brain. This could lead to serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and irritability.

Tacrolimus (Prograf, Protopic) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down tacrolimus (Prograf, Protopic) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body breaks down tacrolimus. This can cause tacrolimus to be less effective.

Tramadol (Ultram) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Tramadol (Ultram) can affect a chemical in the brain called serotonin. St. John's wort can also affect serotonin. Taking St. John's wort along with tramadol (Ultram) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and side effects including confusion, shivering, stiff muscles, and other side effects.

Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. The body breaks down warfarin (Coumadin) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase the breakdown and decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.
2012-11-02 03:34:11 AM
2 votes:

JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.


You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.
2012-11-02 03:28:23 AM
2 votes:
funnyanimalpicturescat.com

Because, y'know...
2012-11-02 03:03:18 AM
2 votes:
The fecal matter deposited on the trees by wildlife probably helped restore her natural intestinal bacterial flora.
2012-11-02 05:48:27 PM
1 votes:
For those putting her down for going to "Big Pharma" with it, this is what separates someone looking to make a buck off of suckers and someone who possibly discovers a new medicine. Her tree bark will be analyzed, studied, and after clinical studies prove it actually works, it will be made available as a treatment. Or it will turn out to be coincidence that her disease went into remission, which it often does on its own.
Hint: the one looking to make a buck off of suckers isn't the one interested in scientific proof that it works.
2012-11-02 12:03:16 PM
1 votes:

doglover: Many's the night I've been stuck somewhere without ibuprofen in Japan, a country where only 10-8pm drug stores sell OTC medicine. 10 am is a long time coming when your skull is trying to break into six pieces from your nose.


I don't get it. Why don't you just put some in a pillbox and keep it in your pocket (or bag/purse/etc) at all times? You're complaining about running out of something that is small, cheap, easily acquired, easily stored, doesn't go bad quickly, and is essential for your health and well-being. It would take a number of unfortunate coincidences to result in you not having any when needed. It sounds like you just don't plan ahead.
2012-11-02 06:29:48 AM
1 votes:

OhioUGrad: I do know however, that St. Johns Wort works as good as or better than most antidepressants


Only for mild depression. Moderate to strong, it's counter-productive. For conditions where depression is a symptom (bipolar disorder, for example), it's very counter-productive.
2012-11-02 05:18:46 AM
1 votes:

OhioUGrad:
This. Plus there is a reason that pharmaceutical companies don't test/investigate/use herbs and other commonly available "cures".......no patent, no profit.


That's not really true. Pharmaceutical companies are infamous for tacking on non-functional amino groups to drugs derived from common herb sources, and patenting the new compounds. They also find "new" uses (actually things that were unlabeled uses) for the drugs, and patent them again based on those uses.

The more common and less conspiratorial explanation is that many "alternative medical cures" that are out there either don't work at all, cause the disease or patient to get worse, or don't work near as well or as efficient as existing drugs.

It's why you'll never see weed replace glaucoma medication for example.
2012-11-02 03:45:17 AM
1 votes:

BronyMedic: /would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.


That's not ironic.

i25.photobucket.com
2012-11-02 03:32:43 AM
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: [funnyanimalpicturescat.com image 403x379]

Because, y'know...


" 'Oh, herbal medicine been around for thousands of years!' Indeed it has. And then we tested it all. And the stuff that worked became 'medicine', and the rest of it is just a nice bowl of soup and some potpourri." ~Dara O'Briain
2012-11-02 03:09:23 AM
1 votes:
Many parts of a pine tree are edible.
i229.photobucket.com
2012-11-02 03:04:52 AM
1 votes:
I guess it is possible.

Quinine, the wonderdrug that cured malaria, is found in certain tree barks.
 
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