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(The Sun)   News: Woman heals self of incurable disease. Fark: By eating tree bark (w/pic of woman, tree)   (thesun.co.uk) divider line 102
    More: Sappy, Crohn's disease, St. Thomas  
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14063 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Nov 2012 at 2:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



102 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-11-02 02:53:44 AM
That poor tree.
 
2012-11-02 02:56:21 AM
Sappy. Trees. Don't think that slipped past us, Subby.
 
2012-11-02 02:57:10 AM
iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg goes here.
 
2012-11-02 03:01:10 AM
Your pun is bad and you should feel bad... 

/jk - I loled
 
2012-11-02 03:02:11 AM
Ha-ha, you ate part of a tree!
 
2012-11-02 03:03:11 AM
God put everything on this earth for a purpose. It's up to us to find its proper use. Now, I myself eat c*ck, for medicinal reasons only.
 
2012-11-02 03:03:18 AM
The fecal matter deposited on the trees by wildlife probably helped restore her natural intestinal bacterial flora.
 
2012-11-02 03:04:52 AM
I guess it is possible.

Quinine, the wonderdrug that cured malaria, is found in certain tree barks.
 
2012-11-02 03:05:48 AM

Matthew Keene: God put everything on this earth for a purpose. It's up to us to find its proper use. Now, I myself eat c*ck, for medicinal reasons only.


as lomg as its for medical reasons its not gay
 
2012-11-02 03:06:52 AM
Congratulations, you've discovered aspirin!
 
2012-11-02 03:06:58 AM
Strange that the Sun should be so dim.
 
2012-11-02 03:07:25 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: The fecal matter deposited on the trees by wildlife probably helped restore her natural intestinal bacterial flora.


Could be other stuff besides fecal matter.

jamesussery.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-11-02 03:09:23 AM
Many parts of a pine tree are edible.
i229.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-02 03:09:59 AM

James F. Campbell: Strange that the Sun should be so dim.


Well, we are heading in to winter in the northern hemisphere, Mr. Science Guy.
 
2012-11-02 03:10:11 AM

ruta: Congratulations, you've discovered aspirin!


thats only certain trees..which also lends credence to other trees could be producing other miracle cures
 
2012-11-02 03:10:17 AM
Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.
 
2012-11-02 03:12:29 AM
She's barking up the wrong tree.
 
2012-11-02 03:13:48 AM

Hector Remarkable: Many parts of a pine tree are edible.
[i229.photobucket.com image 400x300]


www.chezrougie.com
 
2012-11-02 03:15:45 AM
First that Humira stuff, and now tree bark?
 
2012-11-02 03:16:01 AM
It's not like many medicines and food are not made of the bark of something. WIllow bark was the
source of aspirin, Cinnamon is bark,Acacia has a ton of uses and the bark of the Pacific Yew was
the original source for the chemotherapy drug Taxol. It just may be that this lady hit on some
combination that solved her problem..I hope they research this further. I'm dubious to her selling
it..That just seems like a (PUN ALERT) crappy thing to do, when you know others are suffering like
you did.
 
2012-11-02 03:23:57 AM
I think we on Pluto
 
2012-11-02 03:28:23 AM
funnyanimalpicturescat.com

Because, y'know...
 
2012-11-02 03:29:32 AM
i bet she smells terrific.
 
2012-11-02 03:32:27 AM

What_Would_Jimi_Do: i bet she smells terrific.


I'm not going into the bathroom after she's taken a dump to do the sniff test.
 
2012-11-02 03:32:32 AM
www.teachingchildrenphilosophy.org
 
2012-11-02 03:32:43 AM

Shadow Blasko: [funnyanimalpicturescat.com image 403x379]

Because, y'know...


" 'Oh, herbal medicine been around for thousands of years!' Indeed it has. And then we tested it all. And the stuff that worked became 'medicine', and the rest of it is just a nice bowl of soup and some potpourri." ~Dara O'Briain
 
2012-11-02 03:33:11 AM
I call bs.
 
2012-11-02 03:34:03 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Shadow Blasko: [funnyanimalpicturescat.com image 403x379]

Because, y'know...

" 'Oh, herbal medicine been around for thousands of years!' Indeed it has. And then we tested it all. And the stuff that worked became 'medicine', and the rest of it is just a nice bowl of soup and some potpourri." ~Dara O'Briain


It's a joke
 
2012-11-02 03:34:11 AM

JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.


You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.
 
2012-11-02 03:35:20 AM
I bet the tree looks and feels younger, too.
 
2012-11-02 03:36:04 AM
I'd put some wood in her.
 
2012-11-02 03:38:03 AM

Gunther: JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.

You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.


I came here to say this. Leaving happy, knowing I am not the only one who can call out pseudoscientific bunk when I see it.

/would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.
//willow bark contains salicylic acid, which has anti-inflammatory properties.
 
2012-11-02 03:45:09 AM
have wondered about the wonderful natural cures native peoples once used and if they were all lost as their culture was destroyed.
 
2012-11-02 03:45:17 AM

BronyMedic: /would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.


That's not ironic.

i25.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-02 03:50:51 AM

doglover: BronyMedic: /would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.

That's not ironic.

[i25.photobucket.com image 346x283]


Well life did have a funny way of helping her out when she thought everything's gone wrong.
 
2012-11-02 03:54:03 AM

Fano: [www.teachingchildrenphilosophy.org image 250x254]


leaving satisfied
 
2012-11-02 03:54:43 AM
If this is true, why the fark sell it to pharma so they can roll in even more cash. If I discovered something like this I'd share it worldwide so all suffers could get help without further having to deal with pharma. Come on lady help your fellow man, not the multi billion dollar corporations. Ah whom I kidding, I'd probably sell out too for a fat cheque...

/need money badly
 
2012-11-02 03:54:54 AM
FTFA, "Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant."

I hope the pharmaceutical giant pays a lot of money for a recipe that says "add bark to pie crust mix."

/Grandma recipes
//Too bad if this works, we will never know. (conspiracy and such)
 
2012-11-02 03:55:04 AM
So she went from shiatting fat to fat shiats of blood from the tree bark ripping her intestines apart...

You know what, I think I'd rather have Crohn's than eat bark.

/I detested Grape Nuts as a child
//People who eat that are in the same league as people who eat grapefruit: masochists.
 
2012-11-02 03:56:04 AM
t0.gstatic.com
 
2012-11-02 03:58:40 AM
img803.imageshack.us

/Q&D
 
2012-11-02 03:58:40 AM
Dead cows. Moldy clover. Warfarin.

One of the great stories of science.

Along with why the neutron cross section is measured in Barns.
 
2012-11-02 03:59:11 AM

KrispyKritter: have wondered about the wonderful natural cures native peoples once used and if they were all lost as their culture was destroyed.


One of the biggest problems of modern medicine is that for the past century or so we've been min-maxing everything and relying heavily on medicines, which while effective, are not the only possible avenue of treatment.

I get REALLY bad sinus headaches. They can wake me up at 3 in the morning. Tylenol is a bucket of water on 5 alarm house fire. The only thing that really works, short of prescription opiates, is ibuprofen.

Many moons ago, there was no ibuprofen. There are however, a variety of actions one could take to alleviate the pain. If those were more commonly taught and distributed, I might even be able to weather one of these events without having to rely on pills. Pills I would like to stress are NOT always available. Many's the night I've been stuck somewhere without ibuprofen in Japan, a country where only 10-8pm drug stores sell OTC medicine. 10 am is a long time coming when your skull is trying to break into six pieces from your nose.

I've found a couple physical solutions to the problem, none of them being exercise or cold which are for different kind of headaches, but none of those solutions are really based on any knowledge of medicine or nerves, and are just shots in the dark I've taken that hit something. Now if doctors could sit down and come up with a list of such activities and tricks based on years and years of research instead of just throwing pills at everything, we wouldn't all be caught flatfooted when we get sick without money for Phizer's latest patented whatiz.

Not that I'm saying modern medicine doesn't work. It works great. That's the problem. It's so good I have literally no idea what to do when it's unavailable.
 
2012-11-02 03:59:59 AM

Shadow Blasko: ArcadianRefugee: Shadow Blasko: [funnyanimalpicturescat.com image 403x379]

Because, y'know...

" 'Oh, herbal medicine been around for thousands of years!' Indeed it has. And then we tested it all. And the stuff that worked became 'medicine', and the rest of it is just a nice bowl of soup and some potpourri." ~Dara O'Briain

It's a joke


Well, yeah: he's a comedian.

/a response isn't necessarily a reply
 
2012-11-02 04:00:15 AM

BronyMedic: Gunther: JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.

You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.

I came here to say this. Leaving happy, knowing I am not the only one who can call out pseudoscientific bunk when I see it.

/would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.
//willow bark contains salicylic acid, which has anti-inflammatory properties.


Trying to sit this one out. She didn't say which bark it was and good luck selling it to big pharma.
 
2012-11-02 04:03:42 AM

Gunther: JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.

You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.


Some of this. Have UC. Both it and Chron's very episodic.

/No problems for @7 years; Was @ 8years before that.

/ screws up your life if severe.
 
2012-11-02 04:04:25 AM

doglover: stuck somewhere without ibuprofen in Japan


Something like this would never happen to me.
 
2012-11-02 04:07:43 AM
FTA: The mum of two began cutting bark off trees in a park...

Dumbass damages public property, harms and possibly kills trees or at least leaves them looking ugly like the one in the picture impinging on the rights of the people not to have a nutter running around cutting trees and leaving scars at eye level...

Well deserved lawsuit/fine time coming right up.

/Obviously, she was too stupid to just take a branch where it wouldn't have caused lasting damage.
//Go cutting park trees around here and earn a free ride and an evening out with a law enforcement officer.
 
2012-11-02 04:11:49 AM

Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: FTA: The mum of two began cutting bark off trees in a park...

Dumbass damages public property, harms and possibly kills trees or at least leaves them looking ugly like the one in the picture impinging on the rights of the people not to have a nutter running around cutting trees and leaving scars at eye level...

Well deserved lawsuit/fine time coming right up.

/Obviously, she was too stupid to just take a branch where it wouldn't have caused lasting damage.
//Go cutting park trees around here and earn a free ride and an evening out with a law enforcement officer.


Vandalism charges aside she is also ingesting any type of chemical that the trees have been treated with.
 
2012-11-02 04:19:35 AM
I'm all for finding cures in the rainforest but chewing on public trees in the city is full of stupids.
 
2012-11-02 04:20:58 AM

AbbeySomeone: Trying to sit this one out. She didn't say which bark it was and good luck selling it to big pharma.


It doesn't matter what bark she ate, big pharma wouldn't buy it because she's almost certainly 1) not cured, and 2) eating tree skin probably had nothing to do with it. Crohns Disease is a weird little thing. You can show no symptoms or pathologic changes in bowel for years and then suddenly have a flareup severe enough to have part of your colon resected.

In other words, there's a reason we both isolate and study in controlled circumstances compounds which may be a cure or treatment for a disease. N=1 is a pretty biased way of doing things that is often incorrect when it comes to medical science. In addition, by her own admission, she's eaten so many different species of bark that it's impossible to state which one MIGHT have had some effect on her, and if it did - like the joke about the willow tree - it might be because of something we already know.
 
2012-11-02 04:29:30 AM
img.metro.co.uk

/approves
 
2012-11-02 04:37:14 AM

kiwannabee: [img.metro.co.uk image 450x594]

/approves


AAAAH. DRAUG! KILL IT WITH FIRE! KILLL ITTTTTT!

www.fas.org
 
2012-11-02 04:38:53 AM

BronyMedic: kiwannabee: [img.metro.co.uk image 450x594]

/approves

AAAAH. DRAUG! KILL IT WITH FIRE! KILLL ITTTTTT!

[www.fas.org image 269x242]


What do you have against Ents?
 
2012-11-02 04:39:16 AM

Hector Remarkable: Many parts of a pine tree are edible.
[i229.photobucket.com image 400x300]


Came for Euall...Ewall...Euwawlll....Mr. Gibbons. Leaving satisfied.
 
2012-11-02 04:44:27 AM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: What do you have against Ents?


Have you seen poor Kingsmouth lately?

web-vassets.ea.com
 
2012-11-02 04:48:55 AM
well that escalated quickly
 
2012-11-02 05:11:45 AM

Fano:


God I hated that book. That selfish bastard took everything that poor tree had without a second thought and we're supposed to feel all warm and fuzzy about it.
 
2012-11-02 05:16:01 AM

Gunther: JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.

You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.


This. Plus there is a reason that pharmaceutical companies don't test/investigate/use herbs and other commonly available "cures".......no patent, no profit.
 
2012-11-02 05:18:46 AM

OhioUGrad:
This. Plus there is a reason that pharmaceutical companies don't test/investigate/use herbs and other commonly available "cures".......no patent, no profit.


That's not really true. Pharmaceutical companies are infamous for tacking on non-functional amino groups to drugs derived from common herb sources, and patenting the new compounds. They also find "new" uses (actually things that were unlabeled uses) for the drugs, and patent them again based on those uses.

The more common and less conspiratorial explanation is that many "alternative medical cures" that are out there either don't work at all, cause the disease or patient to get worse, or don't work near as well or as efficient as existing drugs.

It's why you'll never see weed replace glaucoma medication for example.
 
2012-11-02 05:26:19 AM

AbbeySomeone: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: FTA: The mum of two began cutting bark off trees in a park...

Dumbass damages public property, harms and possibly kills trees or at least leaves them looking ugly like the one in the picture impinging on the rights of the people not to have a nutter running around cutting trees and leaving scars at eye level...

Well deserved lawsuit/fine time coming right up.

/Obviously, she was too stupid to just take a branch where it wouldn't have caused lasting damage.
//Go cutting park trees around here and earn a free ride and an evening out with a law enforcement officer.

Vandalism charges aside she is also ingesting any type of chemical that the trees have been treated with.


Around here, government types in the parks get a little riled up when dogs get too near the trees. Dogs are only supposed to sprinkle poles, posts, and other approved locations. Their natural water is not properly balanced, or something. But this lady must be a relative of Bear Grylls, so it's all good.
 
2012-11-02 06:04:49 AM

BronyMedic: OhioUGrad:
This. Plus there is a reason that pharmaceutical companies don't test/investigate/use herbs and other commonly available "cures".......no patent, no profit.

That's not really true. Pharmaceutical companies are infamous for tacking on non-functional amino groups to drugs derived from common herb sources, and patenting the new compounds. They also find "new" uses (actually things that were unlabeled uses) for the drugs, and patent them again based on those uses.

The more common and less conspiratorial explanation is that many "alternative medical cures" that are out there either don't work at all, cause the disease or patient to get worse, or don't work near as well or as efficient as existing drugs.

It's why you'll never see weed replace glaucoma medication for example.


That's possible, but what fun is it if you can't have a bit of conspiracy involved?!?! I do know however, that St. Johns Wort works as good as or better than most antidepressants and has been touted in a lot of medical journals...and doesn't have the side effects. Not sure about others, but a lot of the pharmacists I worked with laughed at a lot of people who had (obviously not life threatening) problems they tried to cure with medications that caused more problems than they solved.
 
2012-11-02 06:29:48 AM

OhioUGrad: I do know however, that St. Johns Wort works as good as or better than most antidepressants


Only for mild depression. Moderate to strong, it's counter-productive. For conditions where depression is a symptom (bipolar disorder, for example), it's very counter-productive.
 
2012-11-02 06:38:24 AM

OhioUGrad: ...and doesn't have the side effects


It's a pharmacoactive substance. It will have side effects.

Insomnia
Vivid Dreams/Night Terrors
Weight Gain
Irritability
Nausea/Vomiting
GI Upset
Dry Mouth
Headache
Diarrhea
Numbness/tingling

It also sensitizes your skin to the sun and makes you burn easy.

It can worsen ADHD, Bipolar Syndrome, Major Clinical Depression, Alzheimers Disease, and makes those little swimmy things in your balls really unhappy.

Alprazolam (Xanax) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Alprazolam (Xanax) is commonly used for anxiety. The body breaks down alprazolam (Xanax) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how fast the body gets rid of alprazolam (Xanax). Taking St. John's wort along with alprazolam (Xanax) might decrease the effectiveness of alprazolam (Xanax).

Aminolevulinic acid interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Aminolevulinic acid can make your skin sensitive to the sunlight. St. John's wort might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking St. John's wort along with aminolevulinic acid might increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.

Amitriptyline (Elavil) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down amitriptyline (Elavil) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body gets rid of some medications. St. John's wort might decrease the effectiveness of amitriptyline (Elavil) by increasing how quickly the body breaks down amitriptyline (Elavil).

Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some birth control pills contain estrogen. The body breaks down the estrogen in birth control pills to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase the break down of estrogen. Taking St. John's wort along with birth control pills might decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. If you take birth control pills along with St. John's wort, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom.

Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.

Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). By increasing the breakdown of cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune) St. John's wort might decrease the effectiveness of cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune).

Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Digoxin (Lanoxin) helps the heart beat more strongly. St. John's wort might decrease how much digoxin (Lanoxin) the body absorbs. By decreasing how much digoxin (Lanoxin) the body absorbs St. John's wort might decrease the effects of digoxin (Lanoxin).

Fenfluramine (Pondimin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Fenfluramine (Pondimin) increases a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort also increases serotonin. Taking fenfluramine with St. John's wort might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, nausea, headache, and anxiety.

Imatinib (Gleevec) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down imatinib to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body gets rid of imatinib (Gleevec). Taking St. John's wort along with imatinib (Gleevec) might decrease the effectiveness of imatinib (Gleevec). Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking imatinib (Gleevec).

Irinotecan (Camptosar) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Irinotecan (Camptosar) is used to treat cancer. The body breaks down irinotecan (Camptosar) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how fast the body breaks down irinotecan (Camptosar) and decrease the effectiveness of irinotecan (Camptosar).

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking St. John's wort along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can decrease the effectiveness of some medications. Before taking St. John's wort talk to your healthcare provider if you are taking any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

Medications for depression (Antidepressant drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort increases a brain chemical called serotonin. Some medications for depression also increase the brain chemical serotonin. Taking St. John's wort along with these medications for depression might increase serotonin too much and cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking medications for depression.

Some of these medications for depression include fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), amitriptyline (Elavil), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Tofranil), and others.

Medications for HIV/AIDS (Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs)) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down medications used for HIV/AIDS. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body breaks down these medications. Taking St. John's wort might decrease how well some medications used for HIV/AIDS work.

Some of these medications used for HIV/AIDS include nevirapine (Viramune), delavirdine (Rescriptor), and efavirenz (Sustiva).

Medications for HIV/AIDS (Protease Inhibitors) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down medications used for HIV/AIDS to get rid of them. Taking St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down these medications. This could decrease the effectiveness of some medications used for HIV/AIDS.

Some of these medications used for HIV/AIDS include amprenavir (Agenerase), nelfinavir (Viracept), ritonavir (Norvir), and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase).

Medications for pain (Narcotic drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down some medications for pain to get rid of them. St. John's Wort might decrease how fast the body gets rid of some medications for pain. By decreasing how fast the body gets rid of some medications for pain, St. John's wort might increase the effects and side effects of some medications for pain.

Some medications for pain include meperidine (Demerol), hydrocodone, morphine, OxyContin, and many others.

Medications moved by pumps in cells (P-Glycoprotein Substrates) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some medications are moved by pumps in cells. St. John's wort can make these pumps more active and decrease how much of some medications get absorbed by the body. This might decrease the effectiveness of some medications.

Some medications that are moved by these pumps include etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine, ketoconazole, itraconazole, amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, cimetidine, ranitidine, diltiazem, verapamil, corticosteroids, erythromycin, cisapride (Propulsid), fexofenadine (Allegra), cyclosporine, loperamide (Imodium), quinidine, and others.

Medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight (Photosensitizing drugs) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Some medications can increase sensitivity to sunlight. St. John's Wort might also increase your sensitivity to sunlight. Taking St. John's wort along with medications that increase sensitivity to sunlight could increase the chances of sunburn, blistering or rashes on areas of skin exposed to sunlight. Be sure to wear sunblock and protective clothing when spending time in the sun.

Some drugs that cause photosensitivity include amitriptyline (Elavil), Ciprofloxacin (Cipro), norfloxacin (Noroxin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), ofloxacin (Floxin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin (Tequin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Septra), tetracycline, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen, 8-MOP, Oxsoralen), and Trioxsalen (Trisoralen).

Meperidine (Demerol) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort increases a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Meperidine (Demerol) can also increase serotonin in the brain. Taking St. John's wort along with meperidine (Demerol) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety.

Nefazodone (Serzone) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Nefazodone can increase a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort can also increase serotonin. Taking St. John's wort with nefazodone might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could lead to serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and restlessness.

Nortriptyline (Pamelor) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down nortriptyline (Pamelor) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body breaks down nortriptyline (Pamelor). This could decrease the effectiveness of nortriptyline (Pamelor).

Paroxetine (Paxil) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Paroxetine (Paxil) increases a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort also increases serotonin. Taking paroxetine (Paxil) and St. John's wort together might cause there to be too much serotonin. This could lead to serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and weakness.

Pentazocine (Talwin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort increases a brain chemical called serotonin. Pentazocine (Talwin) also increases serotonin. Taking St. John's wort along with pentazocine (Talwin) might increase serotonin too much. This could cause serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and anxiety. Do not take St. John's wort if you are taking pentazocine (Talwin).

Phenobarbital (Luminal) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down phenobarbital (Luminal) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenobarbital. This could decrease how well phenobarbital works.

Phenprocoumon interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down phenprocoumon to get rid of it. St. John's wort increases how quickly the body breaks down phenprocoumon. This decreases the effectiveness of phenprocoumon.

Phenytoin (Dilantin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenytoin. Taking St. John's wort and taking phenytoin (Dilantin) might decrease the effectiveness of phenytoin (Dilantin) and increase the possibility of seizures.

Reserpine interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

St. John's wort can decrease the effects of reserpine.

Sedative medications (Barbiturates) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Medications that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedatives. St. John's wort might decrease the effectiveness of sedative medications. It is not clear why this interaction occurs.

Sertraline (Zoloft) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Sertraline (Zoloft) can increase a chemical in the brain. This chemical is called serotonin. St. John's wort also increases serotonin. This can cause there to be too much serotonin in the brain. This could lead to serious side effects including heart problems, shivering, and irritability.

Tacrolimus (Prograf, Protopic) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

The body breaks down tacrolimus (Prograf, Protopic) to get rid of it. St. John's wort can increase how quickly the body breaks down tacrolimus. This can cause tacrolimus to be less effective.

Tramadol (Ultram) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Tramadol (Ultram) can affect a chemical in the brain called serotonin. St. John's wort can also affect serotonin. Taking St. John's wort along with tramadol (Ultram) might cause too much serotonin in the brain and side effects including confusion, shivering, stiff muscles, and other side effects.

Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with ST. JOHN'S WORT

Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. The body breaks down warfarin (Coumadin) to get rid of it. St. John's wort might increase the breakdown and decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.
 
2012-11-02 07:01:19 AM
There is a blue-green cervid in your computer, BronyMedic. Please place your face in a lion's mouth.
 
2012-11-02 07:04:27 AM

Larva Lump: There is a blue-green cervid in your computer, BronyMedic. Please place your face in a lion's mouth.


quizilla.teennick.com
 
2012-11-02 07:15:45 AM

BronyMedic: OhioUGrad: ...and doesn't have the side effects

It's a pharmacoactive substance. It will have side effects.


Those aren't side effects, those are added benefits! Like a prize at the bottom of a cereal box.

 
2012-11-02 07:16:12 AM

BronyMedic: makes those little swimmy things in your balls really unhappy.


That's okay. I have extra balls stashed all over Tokyo, in case of ball emergencies.
 
2012-11-02 07:51:20 AM

ruta: Congratulations, you've discovered aspirin!


Came here to say something similar.
What's next? Chewing on moldy bread ?!
 
2012-11-02 08:06:19 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-11-02 08:55:00 AM
She could have tried Oleander bark. That would have stopped her Crohn's disease immediately, along with her heart.
 
2012-11-02 09:45:14 AM
What if she was misdiagnosed?
 
2012-11-02 09:50:33 AM
Best use of the sappy tag ever. Well played, Subby!
 
2012-11-02 09:55:34 AM
so she STOLE it from a tree in the park
not even her own tree

what does she think she can get away with this shiat

she SHOULD have taken Adalimumab
 
2012-11-02 09:58:07 AM

mr_a: I guess it is possible.

Quinine, the wonderdrug that cured malaria, is found in certain tree barks.


So is aspirin.
 
2012-11-02 10:03:23 AM
Don't forget Yohimbe bark.

This is something that was recommended and used for erectile problems long before Viagra and Cialis.

It works...or so I've been told
 
2012-11-02 10:06:00 AM
www.djdchronology.com
 
2012-11-02 10:07:06 AM

mr_a: I guess it is possible.

Quinine, the wonderdrug that cured malaria, is found in certain tree barks.


There is no cure for malaria. Quinine helps stave off attacks, and was the anti-malarial drug of choice for decades, but it isn't a cure.
 
2012-11-02 10:39:38 AM
You know what they call alternative medicine that works? Medicine
 
2012-11-02 11:00:06 AM
Empircism? herbalism? woman? self-treatment?

She's a witch! Burn her! Burn her!

1. You are what you eat.
2. She eats wood.
C. She is made of wood.

1. Wood floats.
2. Wood weighs the same as a duck.
C She weighs the same as a duck.

She weighs the same as a duck.=She is a witch.

***

"Here's a tip: put a pinch of sage in your boots and all day long a spicy scent is
your reward." --Martin Prince, The Simpsons

If you haven't smelled fresh sage, you don't know what a spicy herbal scent is. My Father bought a century farm which had a small orchard and the remmants of various garden herbs and flowers. The sage was thriving and spreading. It is really strong when fresh. Easy to see why it was used as a natural breath freshener and deodorizing scent.
 
2012-11-02 11:01:58 AM

crabsno termites: Dead cows. Moldy clover. Warfarin.

One of the great stories of science.

Along with why the neutron cross section is measured in Barns.


Because, indeed, they were trying to hit the broad side of a barn.
 
2012-11-02 11:15:14 AM

give me doughnuts: There is no cure for malaria. Quinine helps stave off attacks, and was the anti-malarial drug of choice for decades, but it isn't a cure.


Ummmm.... what?

/artesunate, quinine, mefloquine, doxycycline, atovaquone/proguanil, and primaquine would all like to have a word with you
 
2012-11-02 11:19:14 AM
It is not implausible that bark contains ingredients that would treat Crohn's Disease. IIRC, Crohn's disease is an autoimmune disorder which causes inflammation. Tree bark is no doubt able to protect the tree from insect pests, mold, fungi, etc., which implies numerous types of defence, some of which may be anti-inflammatory, anti-biotic, etc.

Her empiric approach would increase the odds of finding a mixture of active ingredients that works for her at least.

Some of the probable causes of Crohn's and other auto-immune causes can be addressed by re-booting or calming the immune system with the help of friendly bacteria. Tree bark is not doubt also riff with everything going in the way of bacteria and other microbes, friendly or otherwise.

So there are many mechanisms that could come into play, not all of them due to the tree bark source, per se.

This is one reason why empiricism sometimes works but often misleads--everything in the natural world is mixed together. As Charles Hoy Fort points out in his philosophizing on strange events, everything in nature is intermediate, neither flesh nor fowl nor good red herring. He did acknowledge however, that nobody gives their sweetie a bouquet of hippopotami rather than posies. For practical purposes, things can be distinguished, but at some point they merge, especially in the infusoria, what we now call microbes, where plant, fungi and animals gradually become impossible to distinguish because of gene-swapping and other blurring of distinctions.

The pharmaceutical companies will try to isolate, through reductionist reasoning and procedures, the active ingredients from the dross or chaff, so to speak. Mind you, in such a case, the chaff might have value in itself. Bark has a lot of fibre, especially in the sense of roughage rather than water-soluble fibre (such as fruit pectin).

Herbal remedies are all very well when they work, but they have several fatal weaknesses: dosage is not standardized and even the type of plant, the part of the plant, and the condition of the plant (processing, for example, such as drying, grinding, infusing, etc.) plays a major role in determining both dosage and effectiveness. There are dozens of species of "mint" for example, so how do you know which one to take for stomach upset? Some are even toxic to some people.

Like mushrooms, the proof of the safety is merely that you don't get sick or die. Some mushrooms are safe only when cooked or raw, some are safe for one person but deadly for another--a lifelong mushroom collector may be able to eat "poisonous" mushrooms from pure habituation or from knowledge about collecting and preparing them--do they become safer if left to sit for a couple days or should you eat them on the spot, not giving them time to spoil?

Sharing her recipe might be a good thing, might be a bad thing. That's the way herbalism works. The herbalist is an empiric with a shaky sort of knowledge that is one part trial and error, one part delusion, and one part pure luck. Not to mention the placebo effect, which doesn't quite work the way you think it does.
 
2012-11-02 11:35:56 AM

brantgoose: Empircism? herbalism? woman? self-treatment?

She's a witch! Burn her! Burn her!

1. You are what you eat.
2. She eats wood.
C. She is made of wood.

1. Wood floats.
2. Wood weighs the same as a duck.
C She weighs the same as a duck.

She weighs the same as a duck.=She is a witch.

***

"Here's a tip: put a pinch of sage in your boots and all day long a spicy scent is
your reward." --Martin Prince, The Simpsons

If you haven't smelled fresh sage, you don't know what a spicy herbal scent is. My Father bought a century farm which had a small orchard and the remmants of various garden herbs and flowers. The sage was thriving and spreading. It is really strong when fresh. Easy to see why it was used as a natural breath freshener and deodorizing scent.


No, wood floats like a duck, not weighs the same, you silly sparrow, so if she weighs the same as a duck, she's a witch.

//It's a fair cop.
 
2012-11-02 11:47:35 AM

meat0918: No, wood floats like a duck, not weighs the same, you silly sparrow, so if she weighs the same as a duck, she's a witch.

//It's a fair cop.


You know what also floats? Very small stones.
 
2012-11-02 11:56:41 AM

gweilo8888: meat0918: No, wood floats like a duck, not weighs the same, you silly sparrow, so if she weighs the same as a duck, she's a witch.

//It's a fair cop.

You know what also floats? Very small stones.


I've just had a revelation!

The Knights who used to say "Ni" had Crohn's!

Why else would they need all the shrubbery, let alone a tree felled by a herring. They must have wanted all those fish oils as well as the tree bark.
 
2012-11-02 12:03:16 PM

doglover: Many's the night I've been stuck somewhere without ibuprofen in Japan, a country where only 10-8pm drug stores sell OTC medicine. 10 am is a long time coming when your skull is trying to break into six pieces from your nose.


I don't get it. Why don't you just put some in a pillbox and keep it in your pocket (or bag/purse/etc) at all times? You're complaining about running out of something that is small, cheap, easily acquired, easily stored, doesn't go bad quickly, and is essential for your health and well-being. It would take a number of unfortunate coincidences to result in you not having any when needed. It sounds like you just don't plan ahead.
 
2012-11-02 01:21:48 PM

brantgoose: Her empiric approach would increase the odds of finding a mixture of active ingredients that works for her at least.


The thing about Crohn's and colitis is that the disease manifests itself so individually. For many, adding hard fiber (wood) to one's diet, even in small amounts, is likely to make things worse. The other thing about Crohn's is that it can go into remission for years for no recognizable reason whatsoever. Post hoc ergo propter hoc. "After this, therefore because of this."

/ She's just made things worse for many sufferers at the grasping-at-straws phase.
// Fark you, Sun, for being there.
 
2012-11-02 01:25:45 PM

doglover: It's so good I have literally no idea what to do when it's unavailable.


Maybe... buy some before you run out, like the rest of us do?
 
2012-11-02 01:39:29 PM

Mr. Shabooboo: It's not like many medicines and food are not made of the bark of something. WIllow bark was the
source of aspirin, Cinnamon is bark,Acacia has a ton of uses and the bark of the Pacific Yew was
the original source for the chemotherapy drug Taxol. It just may be that this lady hit on some
combination that solved her problem..I hope they research this further. I'm dubious to her selling
it..That just seems like a (PUN ALERT) crappy thing to do, when you know others are suffering like
you did.


Alternately, modern science cured her and she's keeping it under wraps - or was never sick at all and wove the story out of whole cloth - while planning a get rich quick scheme. It's one of the oldest scams in the book.
 
2012-11-02 02:26:54 PM
For any Farker with Crohns, ulcerative colitis, etc and other irritable bowel conditions ...

This is a silver, magic bullet. Listen to me. This shiate works. Let me repeat THIS shiatE WORKS.

Been there, Done That, Cured
 
2012-11-02 02:52:27 PM

BronyMedic: Gunther: JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.

You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.

I came here to say this. Leaving happy, knowing I am not the only one who can call out pseudoscientific bunk when I see it.

/would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.
//willow bark contains salicylic acid, which has anti-inflammatory properties.


But it's equally possible that a complete idiot found a chemical we didn't know cured this. Or, hell, even that eating fecal matter by accident helped. We do not have evidence either way. If it was a specific tree, then it would be worth looking into.

/Believe it or not, science is supposed to err on the glass-half-full side when thinking of things to investigate
//You won't find a damn thing if you just say 'nope, can't happen, nope, can't happen'. You will, however, die of malaria because you thought quinine was unscientific.
 
2012-11-02 02:56:31 PM

docmattic: give me doughnuts: There is no cure for malaria. Quinine helps stave off attacks, and was the anti-malarial drug of choice for decades, but it isn't a cure.

Ummmm.... what?

/artesunate, quinine, mefloquine, doxycycline, atovaquone/proguanil, and primaquine would all like to have a word with you


None of them are a cure. They treat the symptoms, and kill off most of the latest batch of Plasmodiums (Plasmodii?), but your malaria isn't cured, only knocked back for now.
 
2012-11-02 05:08:42 PM

Clemkadidlefark: For any Farker with Crohns, ulcerative colitis, etc and other irritable bowel conditions ...

This is a silver, magic bullet. Listen to me. This shiate works. Let me repeat THIS shiatE WORKS.

Been there, Done That, Cured


If by works, you mean turns you into an Oompa Loompa, then yes. It works. Silver is great as an anti-infective coating for medical devices, and as a dressing agent for preventing infections. It's utterly terrible as a systemic drug when compared with modern agents.

personalmoneystore.com
 
2012-11-02 05:48:27 PM
For those putting her down for going to "Big Pharma" with it, this is what separates someone looking to make a buck off of suckers and someone who possibly discovers a new medicine. Her tree bark will be analyzed, studied, and after clinical studies prove it actually works, it will be made available as a treatment. Or it will turn out to be coincidence that her disease went into remission, which it often does on its own.
Hint: the one looking to make a buck off of suckers isn't the one interested in scientific proof that it works.
 
2012-11-02 05:54:30 PM

BronyMedic: The All-Powerful Atheismo: What do you have against Ents?

Have you seen poor Kingsmouth lately?

[web-vassets.ea.com image 732x250]


Apparently not, seeing as how he's stuck in Fangorn forest.
 
2012-11-02 09:39:52 PM
She said: "I ate hazel bark first and it felt like a dozen ferrets fighting in my stomach."

So at first, her bark was worse than her blight.
 
2012-11-02 10:12:06 PM

Hassan Ben Sobr: She said: "I ate hazel bark first and it felt like a dozen ferrets fighting in my stomach."

So at first, her bark was worse than her blight.


you brilliant son of a biatch,

that worth hmm 7 internets good sir
 
2012-11-03 03:44:44 PM

docmattic: give me doughnuts: There is no cure for malaria. Quinine helps stave off attacks, and was the anti-malarial drug of choice for decades, but it isn't a cure.

Ummmm.... what?

/artesunate, quinine, mefloquine, doxycycline, atovaquone/proguanil, and primaquine would all like to have a word with you


so drink tonic water?
 
2012-11-03 11:17:30 PM

PsiChick: BronyMedic: Gunther: JC22: Marlene now plans to sell her bark recipe, which she is keeping secret, to a pharmaceutical giant.

Keep it classy Marlene. You have the ability to get this out there so people can help themselves but instead go for profit.

You're assuming a woman moronic enough to try to treat a serious disease by eating chunks of bark she cut off of random trees in the park has actually found a real cure. Crohn's disease is known to go into remission for years at a time without apparent cause, it's far more likely she just happened to go into remission around the time she was munching down on some bark and she's just assumed that cured it.

I came here to say this. Leaving happy, knowing I am not the only one who can call out pseudoscientific bunk when I see it.

/would be even more ironic if she claimed to be cured from eating willow bark.
//willow bark contains salicylic acid, which has anti-inflammatory properties.

But it's equally possible that a complete idiot found a chemical we didn't know cured this. Or, hell, even that eating fecal matter by accident helped. We do not have evidence either way. If it was a specific tree, then it would be worth looking into.

/Believe it or not, science is supposed to err on the glass-half-full side when thinking of things to investigate
//You won't find a damn thing if you just say 'nope, can't happen, nope, can't happen'. You will, however, die of malaria because you thought quinine was unscientific.


It's possible, but it isn't equally possible. The odds of her discovering a new compound that effectively treats her condition is considerably smaller than the odds of her just being plain wrong.
 
2012-11-03 11:25:39 PM

miniflea: It's possible, but it isn't equally possible. The odds of her discovering a new compound that effectively treats her condition is considerably smaller than the odds of her just being plain wrong.


Normally, I'd agree, but it's not like she just sat around and did nothing. She ate friggin' tree bark. That significantly raises the odds that she stumbled on something, because she not only took an unusual step, but also ate a non-food item and didn't wind up seriously ill\dead.
 
2012-11-04 01:42:48 AM
I don't think you have a good understanding of statistics.
 
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