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(Mirror.co.uk)   Elephant learns how to speak Korean, still struggles with chopsticks   (mirror.co.uk) divider line 26
    More: Strange, Korean, Indian Elephant, University of Vienna, human speech, South Korea, Asian Elephant, Kazakh  
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3326 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2012 at 9:43 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-11-01 07:48:29 PM
Sounds like Deniro.

quotespics.com
 
2012-11-01 09:27:08 PM
Pacino

/derp
 
2012-11-01 09:49:22 PM
Well, it does read at a second grade level.
 
2012-11-01 09:49:23 PM
Did he plead for someone to rescue the other elephants from North Korea?
 
2012-11-01 09:56:10 PM
'WHOOOOORE!"
Was that an eleph-
"WHOOOORE!"
Wait, did he just call me a-
"WHOOOOORE!"
 
2012-11-01 10:02:39 PM
annyong
 
2012-11-01 10:03:04 PM
Elfen Gangnam style.
 
2012-11-01 10:11:18 PM
Can't see the vid, but if this is anything like the whale/dolphin/manatee/whatever that can supposedly mimic human speech, I am unimpressed.
 
2012-11-01 10:18:31 PM
The fact that it can play the piano at all is amazing..
www.pianomother.com
 
2012-11-01 10:21:51 PM
25.media.tumblr.com

Maybe she can help the elephant out w/ its korean
 
2012-11-01 10:30:36 PM
Let me know when the elephant can say "pareidolia."
 
2012-11-01 10:37:51 PM
words that translate into English as "hello"

i.imgur.com
 
2012-11-01 10:39:29 PM
i'm pretty sure that wasn't different words. It just made the same sound throughout the video
 
2012-11-01 10:46:17 PM
Some Koreans are absolutely obsessed with making Korean and its alphabet a global language. There's this weird undercurrent of race nationalism in South Korea that sometimes bubbles to surface and is usual expressed with this desire of taking Korean culture and corporate products global.

I'm guessing this elephant will also be bandied about as "proof" of the almighty Korean wave.

/happy to no longer have to deal with that on a daily basis
//now I get to deal with American misplaced nationalism
 
2012-11-01 11:15:25 PM

ciberido: Let me know when the elephant can say "pareidolia."


Don't be an idiot.

Mimicry is a well established ability even lowly humans posses. Birds are known as masters, but they're far from the only ones. They're just the best at human noises.
 
2012-11-01 11:22:17 PM
Oppa Babar style.
 
2012-11-01 11:34:53 PM
But can it ask for coke?
 
2012-11-02 12:10:11 AM
진짜?
 
2012-11-02 12:57:32 AM

Jumpin Jbot: Some Koreans are absolutely obsessed with making Korean and its alphabet a global language.


It has too many circles.
 
2012-11-02 02:35:29 AM
Wouldn't want to be the zookeeper after he eats a ton of kim chee
 
2012-11-02 06:32:42 AM
Those metal chopsticks really are a biatch to use.
 
2012-11-02 07:52:08 AM

FunkOut: Jumpin Jbot: Some Koreans are absolutely obsessed with making Korean and its alphabet a global language.

It has too many circles.


You can learn to read Korean, that is, look at printed Korean and accurately recreate the sounds represented on the page, in a day. Unlike the Roman alphabet, the Korean alphabet was devised by a panel of scholars in the 15th century under the direction of King Sejong. Because it's an artificial alphabet, you don't have silent letters or different pronunciations of letter clusters (e.g. rough, through, though).

You can learn enough Korean to perform simple tasks in a week. Learning to speak Korean at an advanced level takes a lot of work. Not as hard as Arabic, but significantly more difficult than reaching the same level in a Romance language.

Learning to read hangul 한글 (Korean writing; spoken Korean is hangukuh 한국어) is essential if you find yourself in the ROK, if only because the stupid official English transliteration system bears no relationship to how Korean words actually sound.
 
2012-11-02 01:33:57 PM
BorgiaGinz:

...you don't have silent letters....

...어...

Yes we do. What do you call all those "circles"? I don't pronounce any of them. However, it is fun to be able to read/write Korean. Just make sure you know what you are reading before saying any of it out loud! *wink*
 
2012-11-02 07:31:58 PM

lyanna96: BorgiaGinz:

...you don't have silent letters....

...어...

Yes we do. What do you call all those "circles"? I don't pronounce any of them. However, it is fun to be able to read/write Korean. Just make sure you know what you are reading before saying any of it out loud! *wink*


In the example you've given, the circle is a place-holder, not a letter. The letter by itself (the one you're showing is pronounced like the word "uh") would have no context. The placeholder puts it into a syllabic structure and gives it context. That's what the Korean instructor told me back in 1984 when I took my Korean language intro classes before I shipped off to the ROK. The instructor was a Korean.
 
2012-11-02 07:56:39 PM

BorgiaGinz: Because it's an artificial alphabet, you don't have silent letters or different pronunciations of letter clusters (e.g. rough, through, though).


All alphabets are artificial.

Hangul is a phonetic alphabet. Its letters are used to construct phonetic syllables. A letter by itself has no context outside of a syllable, which is one reason why the circular placeholders exist. A letter can have different pronunciations depending upon its position within a syllable, but a given letter within a given position will always be pronounced the same way.

King Saejong commissioned the creation of the Hangul alphabet in order to make literacy accessible to the entire population. This idea succeeded.

The Korean language has a near-perfect phonetic alphabet, but the semantics of the language itself can be just as problematic as they are in other languages for non-Koreans trying to learn it. Korea is a country full of different dialects, with the Seoul dialect being considered the "official" or "formal" dialect of the language. In Korean soap operas and movies which are set in areas outside of Seoul, use of the local dialects adds authenticity to the story. Most Koreans understand the differences in the dialects, but to someone from outside of Korea, some of the phrasing and terminology of the local dialects can appear to "not comply" with the Korean language that is usually taught on the outside. And just like other countries, local pronunciations in certain regions of Korea can really seem to bastardize the language (a problem that Koreans learning English run into when they visit multiple regions in the United States).

As others have commented, it is a good thing to at least learn the Korea alphabet and a few key phrases before going over there, because being able to sound out the words on a sign can prove to be a godsend. Korea does have a lot of signs in English, too, and they're incredibly easy to spot because of the differences in the alphabets.

/go visit the ROK if you ever get the chance
//beautiful country
///great people
 
2012-11-03 08:31:41 AM

Fark Me To Tears: lyanna96: BorgiaGinz:

...That's what the Korean instructor told me back in 1984 when I took my Korean language intro classes before I shipped off to the ROK. The instructor was a Korean.


That's funny, so am I.
 
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