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(Some Italian Girl)   This week's Fark Food Thread: The food of your people. Share your recipes and stories of foods that connect you to your ancestry   (rusticocooking.com) divider line 291
    More: Interesting, rosemary, chili peppers, long peppers, spaghetti, salt and pepper, zucchini, basil, parsley  
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1347 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2012 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-01 03:04:53 PM
Growing up, it was meatloaf, steak, pork chops with mushroom soup, spaghetti with meat sauce and overcooked pasta, and pizza night.
 
2012-11-01 03:06:03 PM
My people use maize. You call it corn.
 
2012-11-01 03:06:10 PM
My family's most unusual recipe is cheese and raisin ravioli. I realize it sounds odd, but is sooooooo delicious.

Use any standard pasta recipe and fill with:

5cups shredded Mozzarella
1 cup grated pecorino
2 cups golden raisins, plumped
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 egg, slightly beaten


Grandma always served it with short ribs or chuck roast braised in gravy (ragu).
 
2012-11-01 03:07:06 PM
Mastodon testicles grilled over an open flame of poplar and oak served with a side of wild berries (NOT THE BLUE ONES!) and field greens.

How far back into my ancestry do you really want me to go here, subby?
 
2012-11-01 03:10:25 PM

Vodka Zombie: How far back into my ancestry do you really want me to go here, subby?


Not that far.
 
2012-11-01 03:12:46 PM
My ancestry? OK, I suppose it goes something like this:

1. Go to store
2. Buy some Polish sausage (kielbasa)
3. Heat it up (on a grill, in a pan, or however else you like)
4. Eat it, while drinking beer
5. Go bowling, and drink more beer
 
2012-11-01 03:14:04 PM
Here's a recipe from my southern heritage:

1) Take a biscuit
2) Dip it in molasses
3) Eat biscuit
4) Enjoy
 
2012-11-01 03:14:43 PM
Take one pot. Put food in it. Cover it with water. Boil for several hours.

/The ancestors were British
//I blame them for the bad teeth.
 
2012-11-01 03:15:49 PM

iamrex: Vodka Zombie: How far back into my ancestry do you really want me to go here, subby?

Not that far.


Ah...

Well then, I'd have to say my grandmother's fried chicken. It was perfect and amazing, and sadly, she took the recipe to the grave. I've come close to replicating it, but... no luck.
 
2012-11-01 03:17:04 PM
When I was a bachelor I would just have a can of something to eat for dinner.
 
2012-11-01 03:17:26 PM

MorrisBird: Take one pot. Put food in it. Cover it with water. Boil for several hours.

/The ancestors were British
//I blame them for the bad teeth.


Yup.

I was in my 20s before I realized broccoli wasn't usually boiled until yellow.

In their honour: open gin. pour gin. repeat as needed.
 
2012-11-01 03:17:53 PM
Scrapple fried crispy.
Hash brown potatoes.
Scrambled eggs.
Toast.
Baked tomato.

Serve hot.
 
2012-11-01 03:21:00 PM
I;m southern. Everything we ate was fried. We ever fried the milk we put on cereal.

If it couldn't be fried, we gave it to the cat. If she lived, we tried again to fry it.
 
2012-11-01 03:23:07 PM
Matzo brei: French toast but with matzo.
 
2012-11-01 03:23:36 PM
whatscookingamerica.net
 
2012-11-01 03:23:38 PM
i823.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-01 03:24:53 PM

iamrex: My family's most unusual recipe is cheese and raisin ravioli. I realize it sounds odd, but is sooooooo delicious.

Use any standard pasta recipe and fill with:

5cups shredded Mozzarella
1 cup grated pecorino
2 cups golden raisins, plumped
1 tablespoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 egg, slightly beaten


Grandma always served it with short ribs or chuck roast braised in gravy (ragu).


I wish I had an Italian grandma.
 
2012-11-01 03:25:59 PM

downstairs: [whatscookingamerica.net image 243x324]


What do you do with that besides spread it on toast?
 
2012-11-01 03:26:52 PM
The food of my people:

Tater Tot Casserole

1 lb ground beef
1 10 oz can cream of mushroom soup
1 15 oz can of peas
Frozen tater tots

Cook and drain beef. Mix with soup and peas. Pour into a casserole dish. Top with tater tots. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes before attempting to eat.
 
2012-11-01 03:29:22 PM

sweetmelissa31: Matzo brei: French toast but with matzo.


French toast with challah.
 
2012-11-01 03:33:37 PM

iamrex: downstairs: [whatscookingamerica.net image 243x324]

What do you do with that besides spread it on toast?



Not sure.  It was more of a joke that I'm 1/2 Aussie and my mom used to eat that terrible, terrible stuff.
 
2012-11-01 03:35:30 PM
My grandparents ate, my parents ate, I have eaten and plan on eating again.

/there is only one river
//there is only one sea
///and it flows through you
//and it flows through meeeee
/there is only one people; we're on in the same
 
2012-11-01 03:46:12 PM
Looks like my Italian side is covered.

Whenever I want to cook Korean, I go to Maangchi. Her videos are cute :)

Some favorites:
Braised Mackerel
I've used canned mackerel in a pinch, and replace the radishes with red potatoes. A winter staple.

Grilled Pork Belly BBQ
Easy peasy. Make rice, make pork, wrap with lettuce and condiments and make mouth orgasm sounds.

Sweet Filled Pancakes
A little more labor intensive if you make it from scratch, but there are instant box mixes available at stores.

Sujebi
A basic dumpling (non-filled) soup. Warms your belly and soul.
 
2012-11-01 03:46:56 PM
Things that a make a sad southerner feel better:

1-Grandma's fried chicken and biscuits.
2-Tomato sandwiches
3-Fresh peaches.
4-Shrimp boils and oyster roasts.
5-BBQ
 
2012-11-01 03:47:18 PM

Vodka Zombie: Mastodon testicles grilled over an open flame of poplar and oak served with a side of wild berries (NOT THE BLUE ONES!) and field greens.

How far back into my ancestry do you really want me to go here, subby?


Man, I laughed!
 
2012-11-01 03:50:43 PM
I think my ancestors invented hotpockets. Nearly all the recipes we have are for these different varieties of hand pies. I guess they were things you would be able to take into a mine and eat hours and hours after they had been cooked.


A lot of them involved salted meats, dried fruit, and veggies.

Here is one I actually like.


Basic Hardtack Biscuit (4 cups flour, 2 cups water, 4 tsp salt)

Filling

rendered salt pork
dried apple

take a ball of dough, push your thumb into it slap in some of the mixture, fold over and seal, back on lard covered sheet at 375 until gold/brown on the outside.

My modern additions of this that I use for trail food call for a teaspoon of lard into the dough and the addition of pepper, honey, and rosemary to the filling. Grandma couldn't afford it, but its a big improvement.

They will keep for weeks if you've cooked them right and are pretty damn tasty.

I know I know...how does the pork not go bad? Its real salt pork. Not bacon. Its too damn salty to go bad. I only use a little bit anyway.
 
2012-11-01 03:51:34 PM
t3.gstatic.com

Kalua pig - dad's side. So yum.

t2.gstatic.com

Steak tartare and pommes frites - mom's side. Nom.

www.whats4eats.com

From my adopted family - posole. What I wish I had right now.

How do the tater tot casserole people actually manage to eat?
 
2012-11-01 03:54:18 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: sweetmelissa31: Matzo brei: French toast but with matzo.

French toast with challah.


Oh yeah, that is better. Unfortunately I've had a hard time finding good challah in New England. Same with babka.
 
2012-11-01 04:00:13 PM
The food of my people is beer.

But Mrs Tigger loves her all foods in the "Mid Western yellow foods" sub group which includes tater tot casserole, dorito casserole, deep-fried mac and cheese and so on.
 
2012-11-01 04:10:41 PM
The Food of My People:

Biscuits:
2 cups White Lily Self-Rising Flour (yes, brand matters)
1/4 cup Crisco, chilled (yes, it has to be Crisco)
2/3 cup buttermilk (keep it out, you may need more)

Heat oven to 500°F. Grease a cookie sheet.
Cut Crisco into flour until it's the size of peas. Add enough buttermilk (use your fingertips) to make a dough - ass just enough to make it hold together well enough to pull away from the sides of the bowl.
Turn out onto counter and knead GENTLY 2 or 3 times, just enough to bring it together. Roll out GENTLY to about 1/2" and cut with a biscuit cutter (I use a straight-sided drinking glass) - dip the cutter in flour so they don't stick.
Place on the cookie sheet with sides almost but not quite touching. Bake 8 to 10 minutes until golden brown.


Cornbread:
Use Jiffy mix. Just trust me. Make it in a small cast iron skillet instead of muffin tins, and call it johnnycake.


Collard Greens:
Wash and trim about 2-3 lbs. collard greens.
Cut 1/2 of a smoked hog jowls into bite-size pieces
In a large pot (cast iron is best) over low-to-medium heat, render out hog jowl until translucent. Add greens and toss with tongs until wilted. Add water to cover and simmer for an hour.
Serve with cornbread. Don't forget to use the cornbread to sop up the pot liquor.


Fried Chicken:
Cut up one young chicken however you like. Place in a glass bowl with salt, pepper, and Carnation Condensed Milk (not Eagle brand, the regular kind) to cover. Let sit overnight in refrigerator.
On the second day, heat oil in an electric fryer or in a deep cast iron pot to 350 degrees F.
In a paper sack, place 2 cups all-purpose (not self-rising) flour, poultry seasoning, salt and pepper to taste.
Remove chicken pieces from the milk one-by-one and immediately toss into the bag. Shake the bag to coat the chicken. Start with the larger pieces. When removing from bag, shake the chicken lightly to shake off extra flour.
Drop each piece into the oil immediately upon removal from the bag and cook until done - when you poke it with a fork, the juices should run clear. Cook 4 pieces at a time, if you aren't using a turkey Fryer - never crowd the pan.
Cool on a wire rack so the crust stays crispy.

I don't need to tell you how to make Rice & Gravy, right?


Pecan Pie:

Crust:
1 stick butter, room temperature
4 oz. cream cheese, cold
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt

Sift together flour and salt into a large bowl
Moosh butter and cream cheese together with your hands. Drop into the bowl and gradually incorporate flour with your fingertips until it comes together.
Roll out or pat in pan - if you roll it, you may need a little more flour.
once in the pan, flute the edge and put it in the fridge for 1/2 hour to firm up

Filling:
1 cup corn syrup (brand doesn't matter, light or dark, to your taste)
3 eggs
1 cup sugar
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1-1/2 cups pecans

Preheat oven to 350 F
Mix corn syrup, eggs, sugar, butter and vanilla using a spoon. Stir in pecans. Pour filling into pie crust.
Bake on center rack of oven for about an hour to an hour and a quarter. Filling should spring back when touched in the center. It may be wobbly but shouldn't be liquid.
Cool for 2 hours on wire rack before serving.
 
2012-11-01 04:18:18 PM
Pimento Cheese
3-way Chili (chili with beans over elbow mac)
Red eye (beer over tomato juice)

My dad grew up in Oklahoma
 
2012-11-01 04:19:00 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: The Food of My People:

Biscuits:
2 cups White Lily Self-Rising Flour (yes, brand matters)
1/4 cup Crisco, chilled (yes, it has to be Crisco)
2/3 cup buttermilk (keep it out, you may need more)

Heat oven to 500°F. Grease a cookie sheet.
Cut Crisco into flour until it's the size of peas. Add enough buttermilk (use your fingertips) to make a dough - ass just enough to make it hold together well enough to pull away from the sides of the bowl.
Turn out onto counter and knead GENTLY 2 or 3 times, just enough to bring it together. Roll out GENTLY to about 1/2" and cut with a biscuit cutter (I use a straight-sided drinking glass) - dip the cutter in flour so they don't stick.
Place on the cookie sheet with sides almost but not quite touching. Bake 8 to 10 minutes until golden brown.


Cornbread:
Use Jiffy mix. Just trust me. Make it in a small cast iron skillet instead of muffin tins, and call it johnnycake.


Collard Greens:
Wash and trim about 2-3 lbs. collard greens.
Cut 1/2 of a smoked hog jowls into bite-size pieces
In a large pot (cast iron is best) over low-to-medium heat, render out hog jowl until translucent. Add greens and toss with tongs until wilted. Add water to cover and simmer for an hour.
Serve with cornbread. Don't forget to use the cornbread to sop up the pot liquor.


Fried Chicken:
Cut up one young chicken however you like. Place in a glass bowl with salt, pepper, and Carnation Condensed Milk (not Eagle brand, the regular kind) to cover. Let sit overnight in refrigerator.
On the second day, heat oil in an electric fryer or in a deep cast iron pot to 350 degrees F.
In a paper sack, place 2 cups all-purpose (not self-rising) flour, poultry seasoning, salt and pepper to taste.
Remove chicken pieces from the milk one-by-one and immediately toss into the bag. Shake the bag to coat the chicken. Start with the larger pieces. When removing from bag, shake the chicken lightly to shake off extra flour.
Drop each piece into the oil immediately upon removal from t ...


Jiffy? You heathen.

Cornbread:

stoneground cornmeal
salt
1/2 tsp each baking powder & baking soda
vegetable oil
buttermilk
bacon grease

combine about 2 cups cornmeal with a pinch or two of salt, the soda and powder. add a good splash of oil and enough buttermilk to make the consistancy of thick cake batter. heat bacon grease in a small cast iron skillet on the stove until it starts to smoke add the batter and bake at 400 until golden brown.
 
2012-11-01 04:20:23 PM
A can opener.
 
2012-11-01 04:26:17 PM
Potatoes. Boil them and eat as many as you can. Then drink a bottle of whisky and beat your wife. Top with a dollop of cremé fraiche
 
2012-11-01 04:26:24 PM
I make a rally good picadillo and a pretty decent arroz con pollo.
Christmas at my family's house is always lechon asado and turron.
 
2012-11-01 04:27:37 PM
The Food of My People (blue-collar family of 5 during the 70s):

Beef Stroganoff:

1 pkg Mueller's egg noodles
1 jar Heinz brown gravy
leftover deli roast beef

Cook noodles according to package.
Reheat gravy according to label.
Add hand-torn roast beef to gravy. Stir till heated
Drain noodles
Pour noodles into large bowl, cover w/gravy & meat.
Serve.

/3 of my grandparents are Hungarian, the 4th German
//My mother couldn't cook to save her life, even if we had the budget at the time
///Unearthed my paternal grandmother's Goulash recipe when I was visiting about 10 years ago. I'll post that in a bit.
 
2012-11-01 04:34:45 PM

brigid_fitch: The Food of My People (blue-collar family of 5 during the 70s):

Beef Stroganoff:

1 pkg Mueller's egg noodles
1 jar Heinz brown gravy
leftover deli roast beef

Cook noodles according to package.
Reheat gravy according to label.
Add hand-torn roast beef to gravy. Stir till heated
Drain noodles
Pour noodles into large bowl, cover w/gravy & meat.
Serve.

/3 of my grandparents are Hungarian, the 4th German
//My mother couldn't cook to save her life, even if we had the budget at the time
///Unearthed my paternal grandmother's Goulash recipe when I was visiting about 10 years ago. I'll post that in a bit.


One of your Hungarian grandparents should have beaten your mother.
 
2012-11-01 04:38:16 PM

Cyberluddite: 1. Go to store
2. Buy some Polish sausage (kielbasa)
3. Heat it up (on a grill, in a pan, or however else you like)
4. Eat it, while drinking beer
5. Go bowling, and drink more beer



There is no part of that I don't like.
 
2012-11-01 04:40:03 PM

TheDumbBlonde: Jiffy? You heathen.


Hey - it's a good product. Hospitality demands I never inflict my cornbread on a guest.

Although, your recipe would also make fantastic cracklin' cornbread. I might try again, I have some really good cracklin's in the house from the local butcher shop (cleverly disguised as chiccarones).
 
2012-11-01 04:42:44 PM
My ancestry is Irish, German and Cherokee. Outside of beer, I don't know of any Irish or German foods I like. I'm not familiar with what would be considered Cherokee food, but I do like rabbit and venison.
 
2012-11-01 04:49:42 PM
Authentic Hungarian Goulash:

1 1/2lbs beef (shoulder works best) cut into 1x1" cubes
2 tablespoons oil or lard
2 medium onions, chopped
2 cloves of grated garlic (grated garlic is stronger but you can use crushed if you want)
1-2 carrots, diced
1 parsnip, diced
1-2 celery leaves
2 medium tomatoes, peeled and chopped
2 fresh green peppers
2-3 medium potatoes, sliced
1 tablespoon Hungarian paprika powder (MUST be Hugarian paprika, not just any paprika from the spice shelf!)
1 teaspoon ground caraway seed
1 bay leaf
ground black pepper and salt according to taste
water

Csipetke (noodles for the goulash--optional, esp. if you're going to be eating the stew with bread)
1 small egg,
flour,
a pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon water

Directions for Goulash:
Heat up the oil or lard in a pot (cast iron is best) and cook onions in it until they are golden brown in color.

Sprinkle the cooked onions with paprika while stirring them to prevent the paprika from burning.

Add the beef cubes and and saute them till they turn white and get a bit of brownish color as well.

Let the beef simmer in its juices while adding the garlic, caraway seed, some salt and pepper, bay leaf.

Pour JUST ENOUGH water to cover the contents of the pan and simmer for 1 1/2 hours or until meat is about half cooked.

Add the carrots, parsnip, the potatoes, and celery leaf. If you feel you need more salt, add now.

Add more (2-3 cups) water--enough to cover contents of pan.

When the vegetables and the meat are almost done (Nana was never clear on time here and I've found that it varies wildly depending on the beef. I usually start checking after 20 minutes) add the tomatoes and green peppers.

If desired, add the csipetke (directions below)

Continue to cook on low heat for another 5 minutes.

Should be an even consistency, somewhere between a soup & a stew.

Directions for Csipetke
(Not a lot of specifics here--Nana said people like csipetke different ways so left it open to interpretation)

Beat up a small egg, add a pinch of salt and as much flour as you need to knead a stiff dough (you can add some water if necessary).

Flatten the dough between your palms (about 1/2" thick) and pinch small, bean-sized pieces from it

Add them to the boiling stew. They need about 5 minutes to cook.
 
2012-11-01 04:56:12 PM
img3.findthebest.com


oh and also

beerandamovie.files.wordpress.com


we just want you to be happy.
 
2012-11-01 04:56:57 PM

Shostie: The food of my people:

Tater Tot Casserole

1 lb ground beef
1 10 oz can cream of mushroom soup
1 15 oz can of peas
Frozen tater tots

Cook and drain beef. Mix with soup and peas. Pour into a casserole dish. Top with tater tots. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes before attempting to eat.


Try it with corn instead of peas. Also add shredded cheddar on top.
 
2012-11-01 05:01:01 PM
Ingredients
1 sheep stomach
1 sheep liver
1 sheep heart
1 sheep tongue
1/2 pound suet, minced
3 medium onions, minced
1/2 pound dry oats, toasted
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon dried ground herbs
Directions
Rinse the stomach thoroughly and soak overnight in cold salted water.

Rinse the liver, heart, and tongue. In a large pot of boiling, salted water, cook these parts over medium heat for 2 hours. Remove and mince. Remove any gristle or skin and discard.

In a large bowl, combine the minced liver, heart, tongue, suet, onions, and toasted oats. Season with salt, pepper, and dried herbs. Moisten with some of the cooking water so the mixture binds. Remove the stomach from the cold salted water and fill 2/3 with the mixture. Sew or tie the stomach closed. Use a turning fork to pierce the stomach several times. This will prevent the haggis from bursting.

In a large pot of boiling water, gently place the filled stomach, being careful not to splash. Cook over high heat for 3 hours.

Serve with mashed potatoes, if you serve it at all.
 
2012-11-01 05:06:21 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: TheDumbBlonde: Jiffy? You heathen.

Hey - it's a good product. Hospitality demands I never inflict my cornbread on a guest.

Although, your recipe would also make fantastic cracklin' cornbread. I might try again, I have some really good cracklin's in the house from the local butcher shop (cleverly disguised as chiccarones).


You can an egg to it if you like...we never have. And it DOES make excellent cracklin' bread I'm told, I'm just not a huge fan of it. (I can teach you how to make cornbread in two minutes.)
 
2012-11-01 05:15:18 PM
Transparent Pie.

You don't want to know.
 
2012-11-01 05:15:23 PM
Who wants some Pickled Herring with Sauerkraut?

/scandinavian and german
 
2012-11-01 05:16:37 PM
Christmas Eve Dinner

-2 bags of sauerkraut (drained)
-1 or 2 pounds of Polish Kielbasa

Mix ingredients into Dutch oven, season with caraway seeds. Bake at 300 degrees for a few hours. Serve with stone-ground mustard and beer.

/German
//Belgian, Irish and Norwegian, too
 
2012-11-01 05:18:04 PM
farm4.static.flickr.com

/I make sure I eat in advance whenever I visit my parents house for dinner
 
2012-11-01 05:18:10 PM
Vodka marinated vodka, with vodka glaze.

Open bottle of vodka. Drink.
 
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