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(Politicker)   Staten Island President, "Don't give money to the Red Cross"   (politicker.com) divider line 62
    More: Interesting, Staten Island President, Red Cross, Staten Island, New York City Marathon, Kirsten Gillibrand, drive in  
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21202 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2012 at 5:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-11-01 03:31:29 PM
16 votes:
I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?
2012-11-01 03:18:11 PM
10 votes:
Yeah, I'm not giving a single extra dollar to the Red Cross until they are able to completely prevent all disasters from happening or single-handedly and immediately fix every problem caused by acts of god.

Or, you know, I'll live in reality and be glad we have amazing organizations who are out there doing good work.

/blood donor
//money donor
2012-11-01 05:39:06 PM
6 votes:
I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.
2012-11-01 09:24:16 PM
5 votes:
Actually it sounded to me like the President of Staten Island was: in a state of shock, pumped up on adrenalin, and hysterically running off at the mouth.

What in the hell could have gotten him so worked up?

Oh . . .yeah.

He'd JUST gotten back from walking about in his destroyed community.

(always a shocker - seeing devastation - where only yesterday - was normalcy)

He'd seen dogs searching for the dead.

People wandering about shoeless and suffering.

People trying to make soup in some sort of bootstrappy fashion.

Realized there were folks - lots of them - trapped in the water under their crushed homes.

And while he might be the "President of Staten Island" - he's also just another human being - and one whose job primarily has him spending his time being a desk jockey.

He's gone from saying, "Okay Jim. Let's meet for lunch on Tuesday and finalize this" while leaning back in his desk chair, with everything in his world comfortably under control - to asking in a stunned voice "Uh. Isn't that trapped people screaming for help? Why is no one getting them out?" and the sudden realization that a whole lot of hurting folks are now looking at him for these "up close and personal" answers.

Answers he does NOT have.

The man is overwhelmed. And he's FREAKING OUT.

He has every right to be.

The ocean just ate his world.

Seems to me we could all cut him some slack.

The folks in his community need help. For the trapped folks it is a matter of life and death. He gets THAT.

That "his people" NEED HELP NOW!

He'd thought disaster relief showed up relatively FAST - like an ambulance. It didn't.

The needed help for Staten Island STILL hadn't shown up . . .

Yet NOW he was hearing - about great efforts already in place - to keep a marathon - from being cancelled?
(gotta be honest - that would've been crazy-making for me too)

What I took from the article was: The folks in Staten Island - desperately need help NOW - rather than later.
2012-11-01 06:47:39 PM
5 votes:

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


I'll take a different tact, which is quite unusual for me, because I usually like slamming crying assholes. Living through Katrina and the aftermath was different in NOLA because we knew it was going to happen eventually. I mean we really KNEW for a fact that one day we would be farked. I was raised hearing about storms from the 60s and whatnot and everyone else was. Kind of like in the Northeast people are raised to live in massive snow storms and crazy week long blackouts because of the storms. When it snows down here we shut down, like last year, for an entire week.

The average Joe in the Northeast who hasn't left the place and has his snow shovels and snow plows and something in the garage to attach to his F-150 when it snows has no idea what a hurricane really does. You see it on the news sure but you can't FEEL it like you can when you're in it. Just like when I watch people biatching about snow I really don't get it nor do I care to pay attention to the results of major snow storms because "it will never happen to me."

So what we have here is a situation where people see the physical destruction of what boils down to a minor hurricane and they had no idea what it really looked like until now. I've seen hundreds if not thousands of homes personally that were destroyed in various hurricanes. I've lost a home, my brother has lost two, my father has lost one and a half, on and on. I've rebuilt dozens of homes and personally lead a non-profit to rebuild 12 after Katrina. We're used to this shiat just like they're used to crazy ass snow storms.

So in this case I'll empathize with them.
2012-11-01 05:25:59 PM
5 votes:
Charities are an odd thing; people are afraid to badmouth them for fear of being labeled callous even if the charity is essentially a scam.
2012-11-01 06:41:13 PM
4 votes:
I was part of the relief force staged by FEMA for Katrina, a LOT of misinformation has been spread about that and since it ties in with this story here goes. We were staged just west of Tallahassee, Fl (as close to the path of the storm as we dared get, we would do no one any good if we got caught in the storm and ended up as casualties ourselves) when the storm passed word came down that New Orleans (the primary response zone for most of us) had suffered moderate damage so about 70% of us were reassigned to towns in Mississippi, many of which had been totally obliterated, we rolled on those orders and it wasn't until hours later that word came down that the levees had failed and NO was flooded, by then most of us had already passed beyond recall range (cell and landlines were spotty at best and most of us only had VHF radios good for local comms only) so yes response to the New Orleans disaster could have been better but what was overlooked in the blame game is that local authorities are supposed to be responsible for disaster relief in the first 48 hours after a event, it takes time for large scale relief convoys to get into place, roads have to be made safe (power lines, trees, and other obstacles cleared, bridges inspected to make sure our vehicles don't collapse em etc) fuel supplies have to be coordinated (big rigs drink diesel to the tune of 6 to 8 MPG), etc. in short shiat takes time, deal with it.

Unlike tornadoes and earthquakes, storms like Katrina and Sandy build over days if not weeks so there is NO excuse for not being prepared for them, if one is headed even remotely in your direction get at LEAST 3 days worth of food, water and meds for everyone in your household and your pets, if you live in low lying ares (Cough Staten Island Cough) get out, storm surge is no joke its better to look like chicken little and run than to realize that surge is not the same as a burst pipe, its not just water, it is what a storm has picked up in the last 1000 farking miles and is pushing ahead of it, your brick home may be sturdy but it cant stop a barge being pushed by 100,000,000 gallons of water, and if by some miracle it does, do you really want to be waist deep in the leavings of every septic tank and waste water treatment plant from 3 states?


/ya ya CSB, TL;DR etc blow me
2012-11-01 05:50:06 PM
4 votes:
A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.
2012-11-01 05:48:03 PM
4 votes:
I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.
2012-11-01 05:38:07 PM
4 votes:
Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.
2012-11-01 05:20:37 PM
4 votes:

xynix: I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?



Yep.  The first responders are the National Guard.
 
When Issac hit down here, they were passing out supplies immediately.  Red Cross didn't come for days.  But that's how its supposed to work.
2012-11-01 05:51:32 PM
3 votes:
We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).
2012-11-01 05:39:55 PM
3 votes:
He's Right

Good Advice
2012-11-01 05:30:56 PM
3 votes:
What's wrong with soup?
2012-11-01 03:26:58 PM
3 votes:
"You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?"

Translation:

HOW DARE THEY WAIT UNTIL AFTER THE STORM PASSES TO BEGIN TO ASSESS THE DAMAGE?!?!
2012-11-01 02:01:19 PM
3 votes:

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?


I believe all five boroughs have their own presidents. It's basically a glorified homeowners association.

/NYC is always a weird outlier when it comes to things urban.
2012-11-01 08:26:39 PM
2 votes:

pxlboy: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

This is why I prefer to donate blood.


My house burned down in 1997 on Long Island. I was 17. The house and everything inside was a total loss, my parents had no insurance as they were renters and because of their own foolishness. The only thing we didn't lose were our lives. The Red Cross got my family, (Parents, brother, dog, cat & myself) into a hotel for a week beginning the night of the fire.

We had a lot of help from very, very generous friends, family, co-workers and school officials but the Red Cross did the following:

Provided vouchers for food (for humans and pets)

Provided 3 sets of clothing for each member of my family within 24 hours (new underwear, socks & donated articles of the rest), in the following weeks we received vouchers to buy additional clothing.

Provided access to a warehouse of furniture to completely refurnish the apartment we eventually rented.
(including brand new mattresses & box springs -- the rest of the furniture were hand me downs)

MOST IMPORTANTLY, Our case worker Alexandra provided my Mother and Father with HOPE. She provided them with support and the strengthened their will to go on after they lost everything. She told my mother, You just need to get through the next 5 minutes - tomorrow we'll worry about tomorrow. Eventually You'll be able to move on.

For that ASSHOLE to tell his constituents that based on this sole example no one should donate to the Red Cross -- fark HIM. This storm has been a tragedy. I have family members that have lost everything and I'm doing what I can for them. I'm following the example I learned from the Red Cross 15 years ago. I'm not saying there haven't been mistakes or that the Red Cross is exempt from scrutiny, but they try to help. They TRY to cut through the red tape. Their volunteers want to help.
2012-11-01 08:12:11 PM
2 votes:

ThrobblefootSpectre: I just don't understand why naive people are so hateful about the red cross.


To make excuses for or avoid feeling guilty about not donating.
2012-11-01 06:33:04 PM
2 votes:
There is a problem here and a lot of people are clueless.

The Red Cross is a first responder.

Their mission is to provide services as soon as possible. For disasters that had some early notice their people and resources are moved into secure areas in advance so that they can provide aid and support immediately. While they do provide ongoing support, they have always been first responders. They even have joint authority with FEMA.
2012-11-01 06:11:55 PM
2 votes:

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.



Nice generalization. Would you expect to hear all that much from the majority non-whining portion of the population? Crowds of people swarming reporters to yell into the cameras "DOIN' FINE!!!"?

/Yes, this guy is obviously an idiot with a bunch of misplaced frustration
2012-11-01 06:09:52 PM
2 votes:
The Red Cross screwed NY after 9/11, so why should it be any different now?

They're a fundraising organization at this point. They have huge administrative expenses, and really are more of a brand than a relief organization. They do, however, have an excellent media outreach organization, which is what matters.

The salvation army does a much better job for substantially less.
2012-11-01 05:53:10 PM
2 votes:
""It is as t'e borough president, Jim Molinaro, said, it's disgusting, it really is,' State Senator Andy Lanza said, criticizing the city for giving the go-ahead to the New York City Marathon this weekend and the focus on pumping the water out of the East River tunnels. 'We're talking about getting water of the tunnel. Let's get the water out of the tunnel tomorrow, let's get the people out of the water today. "

Yeah, because opening thoroughfares that trucks loaded with supplies can traverse IS COMPLETELY UNRELATED TO HELPING PEOPLE.
2012-11-01 05:45:19 PM
2 votes:

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


I remember hearing stories similar to this from my parents/grandparents.
Now, the Salvation Army on the other hand, actually gets their hands dirty, and genuinely help.
Though I'm pretty much agnostic, I do (financially) support the Salvation Army for helping those that most of us would just like to try to pretend don't exist (homeless, drug addicts, abused women, etc.)
2012-11-01 05:43:08 PM
2 votes:
Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.
2012-11-01 05:38:57 PM
2 votes:
An impatient New Yorker? Now I've seen everything!
2012-11-01 05:34:14 PM
2 votes:
Talk about your misplaced anger.
2012-11-01 05:33:55 PM
2 votes:
Guy who works for me is deeply involved in Red Cross as a volunteer. He's always working with them, setting up shelters and assessing damage after hurricanes and tornadoes. They actually requested he go to New York for two weeks to assist but he had to decline because we've got some big projects going on at work, and while we're more than happy to give him some leeway when it comes to helping them out, two weeks right now is pretty tough.

Talking with him, some Red Cross organizations are run very well, others not so much. It could be that the people who work in locations that are getting hit with disasters on a more frequent basis know how to handle it better than people who don't. No matter how much you practice and drill and do table top exercises. Nothing is quite as tough as the real thing.
2012-11-02 07:26:16 PM
1 votes:

TDBoedy: Why? They live on an island in the direct path of many hurricane tracks. This was hardly a surprise. Anyone that stayed that COULD have left pretty much is winning a darwin award at this point.


It's not exactly the Bahamas. There have been a whopping 14 October hurricanes that have affected the state of New York since the 17th century. That's out of 85 total.
2012-11-02 05:20:08 PM
1 votes:

Isildur: Yes, this guy is obviously an idiot with a bunch of misplaced frustration


On reflection, this may not have been fair of me. I don't know enough of the facts to be making such a declaration one way or another.
2012-11-02 01:11:08 PM
1 votes:
Two big reasons we think the Red Cross can get lost:

1.
Remember those fundraisers for relief after 9/11 and Katrina? People gave and gave. Then it came out that the money didn't go to disaster relief, it went to the "general fund" to be put back for future use. When people give money, they want it to go to helping people in need, not to be hoarded and spent on administrative expenses while people go cold and hungry. People have long memories about being ripped off, and if you hold a fundraiser for disaster relief, people expect the money to go to relief for that disaster, not generally into your pockets with a little going towards the disaster.

2.
A $500k/year salary for your head, and six-figure salaries for local chapter heads. Do you know what kind of leadership you can get for cheaper? The President of the USA has a salary of $400k/year. A four-star General/Admiral makes ~$190k/year, a one-star General/Admiral makes around $145k/year. The average State Governor makes $130k/year, with governors of some smaller states making less. You don't need to pay 500k/year to have a top-grade leader, that kind of money just gets you entitled CEO types who think more about themselves than the organization.

Here's a link to an ABC News story from last year: Link. After fires in southern California, they raised over $400,000, of which only about $150,000 went to disaster relief, the rest went to things like renovations to the San Diego chapter's headquarters, including a new phone system. The head of the San Diego chapter makes around $300,000/year.
2012-11-02 10:41:24 AM
1 votes:

Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"


And they have multiple regional managers who make in the $250,000 range (and that's just salary, their total compensation package is higher - they get good benefits).

Just like Gail McGovern, these people do not focus on managing organizations or charities that resemble the ones they end up heading. Instead they manage other businesses (Gail is from AT & T), but sit on the boards of colleges or what-not. This prepares them to go to lots of long, boring meetings and follow the Brown Act, but it does not give them on-the-ground experience on how to respond to emergencies.

Red Cross, if you're listening, start hiring your CEO's and managers from within. Pay them less. There are thousands of unemployed managerial types, it's no longer "but we have to pay that much to get anyone at all to work for us." Nope, you can find a CEO for $125,000 including benefits and that person will be very happy to have that compensation. Further, that person might actually be a former fire chief or someone whose actually dealt with a disaster on the ground.

Even better, hire one of the thousands of professional volunteers who've worked for you for free for years.
2012-11-02 02:23:04 AM
1 votes:

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


Me too... my work place raised about ten grand for them after 9-11. Turned out the- Red Cross promise to give every dime to victims, first responders, and families there-of turned out to actually mean 'we though you wanted to buy us a new phone system!"

Farkers. Worse then useless...
2012-11-01 11:35:45 PM
1 votes:

Macular Degenerate: If you live near a hospital with a blood bank (most people do, as even medium sized hospitals have them), donate your blood directly to the blood bank. Your donation gets to the people who need it faster, meaning it has a longer shelf life, and the hospitals don't get charged the ridiculous markup that the Red Cross charges for selling them the blood that they collect.

The Red Cross in the US is a farking scam. They are so bloated with their overhead that they can't even sell hospitals a product they get for free and cover their costs. One pint of blood collected by the Red Cross is sold to hospitals for ~$150. For a product donated to them. For free. They run 200,000 blood drives every year, collecting millions of pints of blood. And they still can't break even. There's something fundamentally wrong with that organization.


Do you have any sense of the logistics behind the blood drive operations? The testing that has to be done on each and every unit? The nonexistent margin for error?

There are many misguided axes being ground in this thread.
2012-11-01 11:14:29 PM
1 votes:

Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.


A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"
2012-11-01 09:36:18 PM
1 votes:
I have grown up with uncles and their friends that served in WWII and Korea.
None of them ever had a nice thing to say about the red cross.
If a disaster happens locally, and a local charity is started to help, I will donate to it.
2012-11-01 09:06:44 PM
1 votes:

Benjimin_Dover: While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.




They have millions of people in need. They need to load up trucks and get them moving. I expect they have centralized warehouses at which they load up pre-packaged supplies with forklifts by the pallet-load. Doing this would make it quick and efficient. The cooks at destination sites know what is coming, and probably have streamlined processes to make it and get it served.

Or, you know, they could stop at every neighborhood can drive to pick up whatever random donations people drop off, sort them for expiration, category, etc. Then they could sort that mismatched pile into some kind of shippable configuration, and then take it somewhere.

Meanwhile, the cooks they've got at the destination sites have no idea what is arriving, what quantity, quality, variety, etc. Because they don't know what is being donated, they don't know what will be required to cook it, prepare it, or serve it.

Do you want an efficient, streamlined, rapid response, or do you want to feel good about donating your own little 2 cans of cream of mushroom soup?
2012-11-01 08:03:59 PM
1 votes:

pciszek: OK, where can I donate money to help with disaster relief for areas hit by Sandy? Folks here have dissed the Red Cross. The Salvation Army, as I understand it, requires that people participate in religious services to receive aid. Is that true? Do they deny aid to gay people, as others here have claimed?


Check Charity Watch and Charity Navigator. There are hundreds of charities with descriptions of their charter, and detailed financial analysis. BTW - Red cross is highly rated by both. Getting charity advice on fark, is like asking farkers if Muslims are okay people.
2012-11-01 07:50:18 PM
1 votes:

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.


The difference is, it is an international organization, serving 95+ nations, with over 90+ million volunteers. Surprise, that requires more overhead than a local soup kitchen with 10 people and 50 customers.

The still have 92% charity ratio (expenses to services provided) and are highly rated by independent charity watch organizations. 

I just don't understand why naive people are so hateful about the red cross.
2012-11-01 07:38:22 PM
1 votes:
It's one of those situations that sucks balls and sometimes people feel the need to lash out in frustration in frustration.  That someone in a leadership position would immediately start playing the blame game doens't seem like a very fruitful use of their position of power.
 
Lashing out against one of a handful of relief organizations that has the resources, personnel, and means to actually provide meaningful relief is y dunderheaded.  Maybe pick up a phone and reach out before shooting your own consituency in the foot?
2012-11-01 07:14:20 PM
1 votes:
Reports from New Jersey ring like prophecies of the apocalypse. Corpses float hopelessly in what used to be a thriving and distinctive downtown; coffins rise from the ground; alligators, sharks and snakes ply the poisonous waters .

Further discouraging reports out of New Jersey about bands of rapists going from block to block, people walking around in feces, dead bodies floating everywhere. And we know that sniper fire continues.
linky
2012-11-01 06:57:03 PM
1 votes:
The people there, the neighbors who had no electricity, were making soup. Making soup. It's very emotional...
i694.photobucket.com

Is chowder still considered "soup"? If so, it's set to be a tragic night of heartbreak at Casa Whiskers.
2012-11-01 06:52:20 PM
1 votes:

Pribar: short shiat takes time, deal with it.


Not to mention the Red Cross doesn't have the equipment or personnel to clear roads. A disaster "first responder" isn't the same as what most people think of as a first responder. First ones in are construction crews and, if necessary, National Guard. And that's only after the damage is done.

Second, your survival is their concern; your comfort is not. They will not be bringing in dry socks or give a rat's ass about your cell phone running out of batteries. Potable water if you haven't had a drop to drink in three days, OK.

Finally, they divert donations because they understand the job better than you do. Your generous donation is appreciated, but they have no means or inclination of having it magically appear in the hands of the victims, and even if they did, there's nothing to buy and FEMA got slammed over victims spending the money on non-essentials. When disaster strikes they use what they have, and the donations are used to stock up for the next one. Cash is basically worthless in a disaster area; logistics doesn't work that way. Otherwise they'd be chasing the same last few bottles of water as the victims in the area -- what would be the point of that?

/ Sister worked for the Red Cross
// They're not perfect but FFS they're not Comcast
2012-11-01 06:44:09 PM
1 votes:
The Red Cross is as much a machine for political appointments as any other right wing Christian charity. Are they paid too much? Are their uses for funds uncreative and poorly directed? Like any charity of a certain size, their management is concerned with grant writing and funding proposals. The high pay wouldn't be so bad if there was more emphasis on hiring and doing a job than there is on grant writing. Alas, they are the best we've got. Capitalism is failing. disaster relief should not be about competition, but even charities are forced to be all about competing for money. The problem is not the RC per se, it is a system of life-or-death resources being directed by shiatty, corporate structures. Competition is simply not efficient in every activity human life demands.

And don't even get me started on the farked up right wing Christian community-based funding panels. Holy shiat, they have no idea what people need. it's all about status at the lawn bowling club or at the golf tournaments.
2012-11-01 06:29:50 PM
1 votes:
The Red Cross jumped the shark ages ago. Thievin' carnts.

They got pinged for some major league diversion of funds regarding a recent-ish disaster appeal over here. Of course when they realised something was amiss with their accounting got caught the Red Cross held a sombre press conference and said they were very very sorry. So sorry that they blatantly piggybacked a disaster to get some revenue stream thickening. So very very sorry. Please can we have more money now.

Nothing but the best for their management level staff [and not just the Red Cross - it's sickeningly rife]. Malcolm Fraser, ex PM and founder of *laughs* Care Australia, once jumped on a near empty jet on his charity's coin coz he needed to get to a meeting. Unrepentant he was, too. Carnt.

Although it doesn't always pay to fly 1st class when you're swanning around to your important charity meetings at 5 star hotels. 

// apologies for the complete lack of links, gym in 26
2012-11-01 06:24:43 PM
1 votes:
Had an Uncle who said never to give a dime to the Red Cross.

He was working as a EU Government official in the 90's and was stationed in Kenya/ Somalia. Somalia was deep in a humanitarian crisis and the Red Cross had collected large amounts of money for relief. What the RCdid was rent out suites for all staff at the at the Hilton in Nairobi and then proceeded to spend every last dime that had been dedicated for relief on living like kings and taking private jets to attend conferences to talk about relief in Somalia. As soon as the money ran out they all packed up and went home having never helped anyone but themselves and never having set foot in Somalia. They spent millions.
2012-11-01 06:20:42 PM
1 votes:

Warthog: Also, I once hooked up with a girl from Staten Island. It was the lowest point in my life.

/This is in fact true.*

*Sadly, it really is.


I've taken visitors on the obligatory Staten Island Ferry ride many times.

I should really leave the terminal and take a walk sometime.

JerkStore: However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


The first time something like this ever happens to your community, it feels that way. It just does. No matter how many times you've seen it on the news, it feels a little bit like the apocalypse has come and nobody cares.

Also, I think virtually everybody in America was being a crybaby after Katrina, but especially local officials, stamping their feet and avoiding accountability as fast as they could.
2012-11-01 06:19:39 PM
1 votes:

LowbrowDeluxe: lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181:

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.


Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.
2012-11-01 06:10:14 PM
1 votes:

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


No, they don't.
2012-11-01 06:04:36 PM
1 votes:
I haven't given a penny to the Red Cross since I learned that they played the leading role in creating the AIDS epidemic.
2012-11-01 05:59:41 PM
1 votes:
Well, the Red Cross did pull some fraudulent shiat after 9/11... I don't trust still don't trust them due to that, I'd imagine many New Yorkers would feel the same.
2012-11-01 05:59:15 PM
1 votes:

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


My father was on the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) when an aircraft blew up on the flight deck. The Red Cross and the Salvation Army were brought to the ship for disaster relief. The Salvation Army provided soup and coffee. The Red Cross sold donuts.

/NSCSB
2012-11-01 05:58:30 PM
1 votes:

pxlboy: This is why I prefer to donate blood.


Let's start a rumor:

Red Cross administrators drink, on average, 36% of donated blood. After you account for spillage and theft, less than 30% makes it to needy individuals.
2012-11-01 05:53:29 PM
1 votes:

kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.


so dont donate to any large charities? anyone working for a charity should do for free?
I dont understand your point. How many families/houses were destroyed?
please give us the math.
thanks
2012-11-01 05:53:08 PM
1 votes:
Hilarious, when Romney wants govt out of services.... who needs FEMA when you have the red cross?
2012-11-01 05:51:44 PM
1 votes:

Zarquon's Flat Tire: that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]

Notice it was a question. My grandfather told me they did, and he seemed to hold a lifelong grudge against them.

I'll look it up later, when I'm not on a mobile.


Snopes says, TRUE (kinda).
2012-11-01 05:50:19 PM
1 votes:

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary.


Like some public school administrators. Thanks for your consistent donations.
2012-11-01 05:48:28 PM
1 votes:
I wonder how Borough President James Molinaro got the job. It doesnt't seen to be on a platform of disaster preparedness.
2012-11-01 05:36:54 PM
1 votes:
Where was the Red Cross? Isn't that their function? They collect millions of dollars. Whenever there's a drive in Staten Island, we give openly and honestly. Where are they? Where are they?

Wait a minute. This guy works for an organization that purports to protect you and is funded through force. If the Red Cross came out to complain about government response to a disaster and told everyone to stop giving them money, how would that go over?
2012-11-01 05:36:28 PM
1 votes:
""You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?""

Why were you in a shelter? Why weren't you out there helping with the rebuilding?

OH YEA!! THE farkING STORM WASN'T EVEN OVER YOU farkWIT.
2012-11-01 04:59:24 PM
1 votes:
Don't give money to Aquaman either.
2012-11-01 03:51:25 PM
1 votes:
Is it too late to give staten island to jersey?
2012-11-01 01:36:03 PM
1 votes:
Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?
 
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