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(Politicker)   Staten Island President, "Don't give money to the Red Cross"   (politicker.com) divider line 248
    More: Interesting, Staten Island President, Red Cross, Staten Island, New York City Marathon, Kirsten Gillibrand, drive in  
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21201 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2012 at 5:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-01 09:39:00 PM

thisisarepeat: Its kinda hard to feel sorry for them since they decided to live in hurricane territory.


Joplin? It's kinda hard to feel sorry for them since they live in Tornado Alley,
 
2012-11-01 09:44:01 PM

Jeteupthemiddle: Like another poster up thread, my grandfather always, always held a grudge against the Red Cross...I think for charging for coffee while in Korea? Maybe?

Anyway, because of his grudge, the money in our family never went to the Red Cross, but to the Salvation Army.

According to this old, out-dated snopes article, the CEO of the Salvation Army makes $13,000 a year plus housing. Which means about $0.93 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes, as opposed to with the Red Cross where approximately $0.13 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes.


Sadly, the Salvation Army has its own problems.
 
2012-11-01 09:47:36 PM

WorthNoting: Actually it sounded to me like the President of Staten Island was: in a state of shock, pumped up on adrenalin, and hysterically running off at the mouth.

What in the hell could have gotten him so worked up?

Oh . . .yeah.

He'd JUST gotten back from walking about in his destroyed community.

(always a shocker - seeing devastation - where only yesterday - was normalcy)

He'd seen dogs searching for the dead.

People wandering about shoeless and suffering.

People trying to make soup in some sort of bootstrappy fashion.

Realized there were folks - lots of them - trapped in the water under their crushed homes.

And while he might be the "President of Staten Island" - he's also just another human being - and one whose job primarily has him spending his time being a desk jockey.

He's gone from saying, "Okay Jim. Let's meet for lunch on Tuesday and finalize this" while leaning back in his desk chair, with everything in his world comfortably under control - to asking in a stunned voice "Uh. Isn't that trapped people screaming for help? Why is no one getting them out?" and the sudden realization that a whole lot of hurting folks are now looking at him for these "up close and personal" answers.

Answers he does NOT have.

The man is overwhelmed. And he's FREAKING OUT.

He has every right to be.

The ocean just ate his world.

Seems to me we could all cut him some slack.

The folks in his community need help. For the trapped folks it is a matter of life and death. He gets THAT.

That "his people" NEED HELP NOW!

He'd thought disaster relief showed up relatively FAST - like an ambulance. It didn't.

The needed help for Staten Island STILL hadn't shown up . . .

Yet NOW he was hearing - about great efforts already in place - to keep a marathon - from being cancelled?
(gotta be honest - that would've been crazy-making for me too)

What I took from the article was: The folks in Staten Island - desperately need help NOW - rather than later.


He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.
 
2012-11-01 09:49:50 PM
If you live near a hospital with a blood bank (most people do, as even medium sized hospitals have them), donate your blood directly to the blood bank. Your donation gets to the people who need it faster, meaning it has a longer shelf life, and the hospitals don't get charged the ridiculous markup that the Red Cross charges for selling them the blood that they collect.

The Red Cross in the US is a farking scam. They are so bloated with their overhead that they can't even sell hospitals a product they get for free and cover their costs. One pint of blood collected by the Red Cross is sold to hospitals for ~$150. For a product donated to them. For free. They run 200,000 blood drives every year, collecting millions of pints of blood. And they still can't break even. There's something fundamentally wrong with that organization.
 
2012-11-01 09:57:46 PM

Why didn't Stanton Island residents leave? What's wrong with soup?

Fark if I know but here's something to make you think..well almost.

s15.postimage.org
 
2012-11-01 10:07:34 PM

Lost_in_Oregon: freewill:

The first time something like this ever happens to your community, it feels that way. It just does. No matter how many times you've seen it on the news, it feels a little bit like the apocalypse has come and nobody cares.


This!

Had a small disaster - micro burst destroyed all 30 full-grown trees on my property - and I wanted to throw rocks at every asshole who drove by to see the storm damage.


When hurricanes Charlie and Frances came through central Florida back in '04, we
ended up having to evacuate in the middle of the farking hurricane. Charlie came
through first and we weathered that just fine in our apartment. What we didn't know
is that top layer structural damage had been done to the roof of the building and the
complex didn't have time to fix it - and didn't even put up one of those blue tarps to
keep out rain until it could be fixed.

So along comes Frances and we figure we can wait that one out too. I mean, we only
lost power for maybe an hour with Charlie. Five or so hours into Frances and water
starts coming through the AC vents. Then it starts coming through the light fixtures.

Not just drips. It was POURING. I was in the bathroom w/ my husband empyting out
one of the plastic drawers we were using to catch water and we hear a cracking
sound, then a pair of screams and then a crash from our living room.

We ran out and our entire living room ceiling was on the floor. My son had been playing
in the middle of the room and at the first crack, my mother literally dove across the room,
grabbed him and kept rolling until they fetched up against the wall in the corner of the
room.

We lost over 90% of our belongings that day but at least nobody was hurt.

What hurt was driving by the apartment a week later and seeing stuff from our apartment
out by the dumpsters and seeing people picking through it. This woman was looking over
my son's crib and I wanted to jump out and pull her away and scream IT'S MINE but I just
cried as we drove past.

Farking vultures. It's not a damn garage sale. People's lives just got blown apart and you're
out there like it's a farking swap meet!
 
2012-11-01 10:18:56 PM

Benjimin_Dover: The stuff being donated by the people in Ohio doesn't necessarily HAVE to be what goes to this area. That stuff could go into the Red Cross inventory and stuff that is already in there can go. Also, money that would have been spent on materials elsewhere for food and clothing now can be diverted to this area.

Stuff goes into one side of the Red Cross, other stuff comes out the other side.

Logistics: How does it work?

The same thing happens with blood donations. Your son is in the hospital and needs blood. You donating blood to help him doesn't mean YOUR blood goes in his arm.




So now, not only does the Red Cross have to mobilize a full forward action to the affected areas, they have to divert attention rearward to collect, sort, and deal with random crap.

Once more:

Efficient:

1. Use buying power and charity status to buy stuff cheap.
2. Receive exactly the supplies you want, by the truckload and/or pallet.
3. Load up pallets with forklift, or just
4. Send trucks directly to affected areas.



Not efficient:

Collect random donations.
Sort to remove expired or otherwise unacceptable goods.
Sort by item type (probably).
Inventory so you know what you have.
Figure out how to use what you have (can't just send 100 cans of random stuff somewhere).
Find some way to bundle, which probably means sorting by size or putting into some kind of universal container.
Now you are kind of at what was step 2 above, except you don't get to pick your inventory and you don't have a nice flow.


Seriously, we figured out interchangeable parts and assembly lines some time ago. It applies here, too.


Lots of other community based entities can put your canned goods to good use. The Red Cross doesn't work that way, and shouldn't work that way. 


/And as far as blood donations go, they make you go through extensive screening on that too, and may reject it. Then it is packaged into identical interchangeable containers and run through a sophisticated inventory management system. Try giving them blood you collected in mason jars and see how that goes.
 
2012-11-01 10:31:30 PM

Amusement: Why didn't Stanton Island residents leave?


Staten Island residents: "We didn't want to evacuate on several days notice because that's inconvenient. But dammit other people should travel across the nation to help me! And they aren't doing it the very next day!"


/fairly typical attitude for the north east
 
2012-11-01 10:40:25 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Don't give money to Aquaman either.


Everyone talks shiat about Aquaman, but he really is the superhero you would probably want on your side in this disaster.
 
2012-11-01 10:44:48 PM
yay let the backlash against nyers commence!

/guy is an asshole
 
2012-11-01 10:48:19 PM
I'm guessing this guy is Republican.

Anyone wanna tell me if I'm right?
 
2012-11-01 10:50:40 PM

lordmoon: LowbrowDeluxe: lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181:

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.

Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.


People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.
 
2012-11-01 10:51:58 PM
Things I learned in this thread; donate blood to local hospitals, Red Cross is more of profit maker than a humanitarian organization. Dumb people continue to breed at a near epic rate. Like rats in a former NYC sewer.

Almost feel sorry for Stanton Islanders..almost.
 
2012-11-01 11:06:16 PM
I hate the Red Cross, but for a totally different reason. Sure, sure, their work during natural disasters is all well and fine, but woe be unto you if you ever volunteer to donate blood. I made the mistake of doing that once, about ten years ago. They asked me to fill out a bunch of forms about my medical history, etc., no problem. My mistake was giving them my real phone number. Not more than a week after that I started getting constant harassing phone calls during dinner time asking me to donate more blood. They only removed my number from their lists after I started screaming at them after the 20th interrupted dinner. Fark them, I hope they rot.
 
2012-11-01 11:07:52 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative. *snip*


Same thing happened to me with the San Fran earthquake. My Army company was there digging out bodies and clearing rubble. We raised over $20,000 to ease the suffering we saw. They diverted the funds away - there was no option for accounting then - and I haven't given them a dime since. Nor will I again.

Local food banks, cancer fundraising, local animal shelter, etc. get my money now.
 
2012-11-01 11:08:52 PM
"City Hall is more worried about getting everything running again for Manhattan and making everything look like it's back to normal. We're not back to normal and we're not going to be back to normal for a long time."

Well, of course. The only reason Manhattanites know of the other 4 boroughs at all is because thats where all their servants live. As long as all the starbucks in the east village get back up and running, that is all that matters.
 
2012-11-01 11:10:39 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


Um...I don't think u were watching the same post-Katrina coverage I was.
 
2012-11-01 11:14:29 PM

Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.


A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"
 
2012-11-01 11:14:52 PM
My grandpa used to yell at clouds, something about the Red Cross charging his unit for flag poles at Iwo Jima.

Also, I have no idea how massive nonprofits work, but I know this: Their senior leadership should not be making more than minimum wage. After all, nonPROFIT means nobody involved gets paid.

Now where can I mail these Spaghetti O's? I'm making a difference.
 
2012-11-01 11:24:49 PM
what scares me about donating to the red cross is that ussually the donations are administered by the united way. we all know how crooked they are. and i dont feel at all that new yorkers are being particularly whiny about thier situation. it doesnt appear that they are looking for a handout. kinda looks to me like they are all willing to pay for thier relief. katrina people wanted everything handed to them. im looking at catastrophes in two major cities and it kind of brings me back to the flooding in nashville and how they handled it. they just buckled down and took care of it themselves(after the government and relief agencys said we cant help you)
 
2012-11-01 11:25:14 PM

Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"

 
2012-11-01 11:31:38 PM

crabsno termites: Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"



this person said it all.

I can run any company in the cpuntry with 2/3 the people fpr 3/4 the cost (very conservative estimates). How? Hire good people, let them work. And yes, I,m ver good at what I do, and have done many things.

/concieted/arrogant? probably.

//Confident? YOUfarkINBETCHA.

///Successful? (see above)

////Retired and happy.

////4 (No, FIVE! slashies.
 
2012-11-01 11:32:59 PM
Go to it, grammar nazis.

/Typing skills substandard.
 
2012-11-01 11:34:33 PM

TDBoedy: He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.


Really ? ? ? : - O

In that case - the bootstrappy attempts at soup making - were probably EXTREMELY terrifying.

Joking aside though . . .

From reading about the condition Superstorm Sandy left Staten Island in - for the folks there to be begging for help - well, it's justified.

It's not like - people who don't want to help them - have to.

But for those who DO want to help:

Staten Island is seriously farked up and - they STILL have parts they can't even get to - complete with folks trapped there.

So they actually DO need help. That's just the reality of their circumstances right now.

Anyhow . . . focusing critically on ANY of the Staten Island folks - supposed lack of ability to express themselves "as storm victims" with verbal finesse - at this particular point in time - strikes me as being a bit unfair - is all I'm saying.

Folks there are IN SHOCK.

The ocean just ate their world. 

/feels so sad for them
 
2012-11-01 11:35:45 PM

Macular Degenerate: If you live near a hospital with a blood bank (most people do, as even medium sized hospitals have them), donate your blood directly to the blood bank. Your donation gets to the people who need it faster, meaning it has a longer shelf life, and the hospitals don't get charged the ridiculous markup that the Red Cross charges for selling them the blood that they collect.

The Red Cross in the US is a farking scam. They are so bloated with their overhead that they can't even sell hospitals a product they get for free and cover their costs. One pint of blood collected by the Red Cross is sold to hospitals for ~$150. For a product donated to them. For free. They run 200,000 blood drives every year, collecting millions of pints of blood. And they still can't break even. There's something fundamentally wrong with that organization.


Do you have any sense of the logistics behind the blood drive operations? The testing that has to be done on each and every unit? The nonexistent margin for error?

There are many misguided axes being ground in this thread.
 
2012-11-01 11:39:02 PM
I worked with the Red Cross for Katrina in an old Wal-Mart building. I've heard people say the SBC, or the Salvation Army did something but Red Cross didn't. What they didn't know is we were all working out of the same building. The people that you saw in certain areas were the closest. My particular job was to see what shelter needed what items. I had to see if they were in stock in warehouses full of donations, if so, I'd call in the trucks for getting it to the shelters, if not I had to order it. I remember FEMA got all the ice in the entire state it seemed, but it was sent to hospitals, so that was good. We had to be careful where we sent the perishables.

I worked next to a Southern Baptist Convention guy who I remember being on the phone yelling at some shelter guy that wanted to reject water in white cans with anheiser busch logo on it. Learned a bit about the phrase "bless his heart" from him.

The problem though was Katrina about broke the Red Cross. They sent out their trained people first, and ran out. I was in the wave of folks that had only 2 hrs or so of training. I was trained to record names and dole out money, but ended up in logistics because they needed someone with computer skills.

The lack of interviewing for the last few volunteer waves caused some asshats to get in. They took their stipend and partied with it or went home. People would just disappear. I've wondered if the Red Cross would go after them for their cash or bill them the plane ticket. Never did ask.

/cool story
 
2012-11-01 11:46:03 PM

WorthNoting: TDBoedy: He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.

Really ? ? ? : - O

In that case - the bootstrappy attempts at soup making - were probably EXTREMELY terrifying.

Joking aside though . . .

From reading about the condition Superstorm Sandy left Staten Island in - for the folks there to be begging for help - well, it's justified.

It's not like - people who don't want to help them - have to.

But for those who DO want to help:

Staten Island is seriously farked up and - they STILL have parts they can't even get to - complete with folks trapped there.

So they actually DO need help. That's just the reality of their circumstances right now.

Anyhow . . . focusing critically on ANY of the Staten Island folks - supposed lack of ability to express themselves "as storm victims" with verbal finesse - at this particular point in time - strikes me as being a bit unfair - is all I'm saying.

Folks there are IN SHOCK.

The ocean just ate their world. 

/feels so sad for them


Yeah, I'm not exactly going to fault the guy for wanting the money to go to people he's seeing helping him out right now.
 
2012-11-02 12:00:34 AM

dofus: I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.


SA supports anti-gay legislation. That's where your money is going.
 
2012-11-02 12:05:07 AM
Another rightwing asshat
 
2012-11-02 12:09:18 AM
The article and the comments below remind me why I hate most people.

After Katrina there were more volunteers from NY in Norleans than any of those hate spitting blame throwing assswholez will ever remember. To them it's "libtardland"...
unless you're talking about 9/11
 
2012-11-02 12:58:33 AM

LoneWolf343: Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).

You're upset because you ended up helping someone who you didn't expect to help, but needed it anyway?


Actually, yes. I give to various causes around the world to help with specific things. I do not give to the Red Cross - whose leaders I do not always trust nor agree with in terms of methods - to spend as they wish.

For example, I've been active in World Food Day and its organizations (through the U.N.) for 30 years. I also give to a French National Educational Fund that has really made a difference in Cameroon - a good friend of mine matches my contributions by giving to a women's economic development banking system in Egypt; she's visited both Cameroon and Egypt to check out how the money is spent.

And that's what I want - specific causes and accountability. When the Red Cross did send their semi-annual statement, I wasn't happy with the amount that went to salaries or where the salary money was spent. I wanted jobs in certain areas (we gave to the Red Cross for 9/11 as well, and not a single PENNY of the money we gave went to New York).

In fact, some of it ended up going to places (like Mexico) where I am already actively involved in doing other charitable things. The appeal was made for New York after 9/11, that's why I gave.

I give to particular causes in Southern Mexico (and in Oaxaca) because I know the people who run them (and even though they are both religious organizations, they are non-discriminatory and further, they mentor American college students in non-profit work abroad, all of which I'm on board for).

I don't have a lot of money to be flinging at Red Cross's issues (or its salary infrastructure, which is enormous).
 
2012-11-02 01:27:16 AM
CASEY KASEM'S AMERICAN TOP 40 - 2/16/74

#40 "LAST KISS" - Wednesday
#39 "SUNSHINE ON MY SHOULDERS" - John Denver
#38 "I LIKE TO LIVE THE LOVE" - B.B. King
#37 "TRYING TO HOLD ON TO MY WOMAN" - Lamont Dozier
#36 "MY SWEET LADY" - Cliff De Young
#35 "COME AND GET YOUR LOVE" - Redbone
#34 "ERES TU" - Mocedades

#33 "THE AMERICANS" - Gordon Sinclair
#32 "ABRA-CA-DABRA" - The DeFranco Family
#31 "CAN THIS BE REAL" - Natural Four
#30 "MOCKINGBIRD" - Carly Simon & James Taylor
#29 "THE MOST BEAUTIFUL GIRL" - Charlie Rich
#28 "NEVER, NEVER GONNA GIVE YA UP" - Barry White
#27 "BABY COME CLOSE" - Smokey Robinson
#26 "TIME IN A BOTTLE" - Jim Croce
#25 "JIM DANDY" - Black Oak Arkansas
#24 "SEXY MAMA" - The Moments
#23 "LIVING FOR THE CITY" - Stevie Wonder
#22 "SMOKIN' IN THE BOYS' ROOM" - Brownsville Station
#21 "DARK LADY" - Cher
#20 "MIDNIGHT RIDER" - Gregg Allman
#19 "A LOVE SONG" - Anne Murray
#18 "THE JOKER" - The Steve Miller Band
#17 "LAST TIME I SAW HIM" - Diana Ross
#16 "DOO DOO DOO DOO DOO (HEARTBREAKER)" - The Rolling Stones
#15 "I LOVE" - Tom T. Hall
#14 "I'VE GOT TO USE MY IMAGINATION" - Gladys Knight & the Pips
#13 "PUT YOUR HANDS TOGETHER" - The O' Jays
#12 "SEASONS IN THE SUN" - Terry Jacks
#11 "SHOW AND TELL" - Al Wilson
#10 "ROCK ON" - David Essex
#9 "BOOGIE DOWN" - Eddie Kendricks
#8 "JUNGLE BOOGIE" - Kool & The Gang
#7 "LET ME BE THERE" - Olivia Newton-John

#6 "AMERICANS" - Byron MacGregor
Note: Casey skips over #6 because Gordon Sinclair's version was played at #33
#5 "SPIDERS AND SNAKES" - Jim Stafford
#4 "UNTIL YOU COME BACK TO ME (THAT'S WHAT I'M GONNA DO)" - Aretha Franklin
#3 "YOU'RE SIXTEEN" - Ringo Starr
#2 "LOVE'S THEME" - Love Unlimited Orchestra
#1 "THE WAY WE WERE" - Barbra Streisand
 
2012-11-02 01:31:38 AM

madgonad: There is a problem here and a lot of people are clueless.

The Red Cross is a first responder.

Their mission is to provide services as soon as possible. For disasters that had some early notice their people and resources are moved into secure areas in advance so that they can provide aid and support immediately. While they do provide ongoing support, they have always been first responders. They even have joint authority with FEMA.


They do not, however, provide tunnel-draining services. Why this imbecile is complaining because the Red Cross is not out there getting the water out of the tunnels is beyond my comprehension.
 
2012-11-02 01:38:08 AM
The Red Cross used to run the blood supply up here until they gave all those peopl aids.
 
2012-11-02 01:47:28 AM
Doctors Without Borders and Heifer Project International are still okay, though, right?
 
2012-11-02 02:23:04 AM

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


Me too... my work place raised about ten grand for them after 9-11. Turned out the- Red Cross promise to give every dime to victims, first responders, and families there-of turned out to actually mean 'we though you wanted to buy us a new phone system!"

Farkers. Worse then useless...
 
2012-11-02 02:36:01 AM
My inlaws live in Jersey and three are shortages of everything (they stocked up) but the electrical crews and tree-clearing services are hopelessly overloaded. I was born and brought up on Staten Island and some SMSs confirmed that they have also been badly hammered. Any state that does not regularly have such storms are not going to have the resources to recover. Florida and other Gulf area states are better equipped but obviously still suffer. Sucks.
 
2012-11-02 07:07:04 AM
Yeah, fark you Red Cross:

i46.tinypic.com
 

/sickening
 
2012-11-02 07:08:59 AM
Is the red cross unionized, that's all that really matters.
 
2012-11-02 08:04:10 AM

madgonad: The Red Cross is a first responder.


Really, so they can get in and put out fires, dig out people trapped in cars/trucks/trains, get the subways started again?

Usually the way it works is this: the REAL first responders (firemen and police, maybe Coast/National Guard) rescue the people, and send them to Red Cross for medical treatment (which they do have volunteer doctors/nurses). The ones that are ok physically get hoarded into appropriate vehicles and driven to the stations. Red Cross does not set up at Ground Zero unless safe and sanitary (after all, how would you like your doctor to have his scalpel dipped in raw sewage before he tries to remove shrapnel?). This is why in Katrina, they did not set up camp in New Orleans, but in various locations safe from the disaster.
 
2012-11-02 08:50:18 AM
Meanwhile they turn down power repair crews because they are non-union.

Oh sweet justice.
 
2012-11-02 09:13:01 AM
*wails at sky

"WHY DOESN'T THE GOVERNMENT DO SOMETHING!!!"
 
2012-11-02 10:41:24 AM

Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"


And they have multiple regional managers who make in the $250,000 range (and that's just salary, their total compensation package is higher - they get good benefits).

Just like Gail McGovern, these people do not focus on managing organizations or charities that resemble the ones they end up heading. Instead they manage other businesses (Gail is from AT & T), but sit on the boards of colleges or what-not. This prepares them to go to lots of long, boring meetings and follow the Brown Act, but it does not give them on-the-ground experience on how to respond to emergencies.

Red Cross, if you're listening, start hiring your CEO's and managers from within. Pay them less. There are thousands of unemployed managerial types, it's no longer "but we have to pay that much to get anyone at all to work for us." Nope, you can find a CEO for $125,000 including benefits and that person will be very happy to have that compensation. Further, that person might actually be a former fire chief or someone whose actually dealt with a disaster on the ground.

Even better, hire one of the thousands of professional volunteers who've worked for you for free for years.
 
2012-11-02 12:32:04 PM
Damn those Christian Commies.
 
2012-11-02 01:11:08 PM
Two big reasons we think the Red Cross can get lost:

1.
Remember those fundraisers for relief after 9/11 and Katrina? People gave and gave. Then it came out that the money didn't go to disaster relief, it went to the "general fund" to be put back for future use. When people give money, they want it to go to helping people in need, not to be hoarded and spent on administrative expenses while people go cold and hungry. People have long memories about being ripped off, and if you hold a fundraiser for disaster relief, people expect the money to go to relief for that disaster, not generally into your pockets with a little going towards the disaster.

2.
A $500k/year salary for your head, and six-figure salaries for local chapter heads. Do you know what kind of leadership you can get for cheaper? The President of the USA has a salary of $400k/year. A four-star General/Admiral makes ~$190k/year, a one-star General/Admiral makes around $145k/year. The average State Governor makes $130k/year, with governors of some smaller states making less. You don't need to pay 500k/year to have a top-grade leader, that kind of money just gets you entitled CEO types who think more about themselves than the organization.

Here's a link to an ABC News story from last year: Link. After fires in southern California, they raised over $400,000, of which only about $150,000 went to disaster relief, the rest went to things like renovations to the San Diego chapter's headquarters, including a new phone system. The head of the San Diego chapter makes around $300,000/year.
 
2012-11-02 01:43:29 PM

WorthNoting: TDBoedy: He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.

Really ? ? ? : - O

In that case - the bootstrappy attempts at soup making - were probably EXTREMELY terrifying.

Joking aside though . . .

From reading about the condition Superstorm Sandy left Staten Island in - for the folks there to be begging for help - well, it's justified.

It's not like - people who don't want to help them - have to.

But for those who DO want to help:

Staten Island is seriously farked up and - they STILL have parts they can't even get to - complete with folks trapped there.

So they actually DO need help. That's just the reality of their circumstances right now.

Anyhow . . . focusing critically on ANY of the Staten Island folks - supposed lack of ability to express themselves "as storm victims" with verbal finesse - at this particular point in time - strikes me as being a bit unfair - is all I'm saying.

Folks there are IN SHOCK.

The ocean just ate their world. 

/feels so sad for them


Why? They live on an island in the direct path of many hurricane tracks. This was hardly a surprise. Anyone that stayed that COULD have left pretty much is winning a darwin award at this point.
 
2012-11-02 05:20:08 PM

Isildur: Yes, this guy is obviously an idiot with a bunch of misplaced frustration


On reflection, this may not have been fair of me. I don't know enough of the facts to be making such a declaration one way or another.
 
2012-11-02 07:26:16 PM

TDBoedy: Why? They live on an island in the direct path of many hurricane tracks. This was hardly a surprise. Anyone that stayed that COULD have left pretty much is winning a darwin award at this point.


It's not exactly the Bahamas. There have been a whopping 14 October hurricanes that have affected the state of New York since the 17th century. That's out of 85 total.
 
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