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(Politicker)   Staten Island President, "Don't give money to the Red Cross"   (politicker.com) divider line 248
    More: Interesting, Staten Island President, Red Cross, Staten Island, New York City Marathon, Kirsten Gillibrand, drive in  
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21202 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2012 at 5:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-01 06:40:10 PM
I haven't heard much of what happened to Staten Island, but shouldn't the blame be more on Bloomberg or OEM than the Red Cross?
 
2012-11-01 06:41:13 PM
I was part of the relief force staged by FEMA for Katrina, a LOT of misinformation has been spread about that and since it ties in with this story here goes. We were staged just west of Tallahassee, Fl (as close to the path of the storm as we dared get, we would do no one any good if we got caught in the storm and ended up as casualties ourselves) when the storm passed word came down that New Orleans (the primary response zone for most of us) had suffered moderate damage so about 70% of us were reassigned to towns in Mississippi, many of which had been totally obliterated, we rolled on those orders and it wasn't until hours later that word came down that the levees had failed and NO was flooded, by then most of us had already passed beyond recall range (cell and landlines were spotty at best and most of us only had VHF radios good for local comms only) so yes response to the New Orleans disaster could have been better but what was overlooked in the blame game is that local authorities are supposed to be responsible for disaster relief in the first 48 hours after a event, it takes time for large scale relief convoys to get into place, roads have to be made safe (power lines, trees, and other obstacles cleared, bridges inspected to make sure our vehicles don't collapse em etc) fuel supplies have to be coordinated (big rigs drink diesel to the tune of 6 to 8 MPG), etc. in short shiat takes time, deal with it.

Unlike tornadoes and earthquakes, storms like Katrina and Sandy build over days if not weeks so there is NO excuse for not being prepared for them, if one is headed even remotely in your direction get at LEAST 3 days worth of food, water and meds for everyone in your household and your pets, if you live in low lying ares (Cough Staten Island Cough) get out, storm surge is no joke its better to look like chicken little and run than to realize that surge is not the same as a burst pipe, its not just water, it is what a storm has picked up in the last 1000 farking miles and is pushing ahead of it, your brick home may be sturdy but it cant stop a barge being pushed by 100,000,000 gallons of water, and if by some miracle it does, do you really want to be waist deep in the leavings of every septic tank and waste water treatment plant from 3 states?


/ya ya CSB, TL;DR etc blow me
 
2012-11-01 06:41:50 PM

Arkanaut: I haven't heard much of what happened to Staten Island, but shouldn't the blame be more on Bloomberg or OEM than the Red Cross?


Or Sandy. That biatch.
 
2012-11-01 06:42:22 PM

freewill:

The first time something like this ever happens to your community, it feels that way. It just does. No matter how many times you've seen it on the news, it feels a little bit like the apocalypse has come and nobody cares.


This!

Had a small disaster - micro burst destroyed all 30 full-grown trees on my property - and I wanted to throw rocks at every asshole who drove by to see the storm damage.
 
2012-11-01 06:42:52 PM

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.


Yeah. Let's get a guy making $45 an hour to run an organization with a budget in the billions. Great idea.

Now if we were talking about The United Way, then sure, I think they have way too much bloat over there but I don't think 500k is too much to pay a guy to run an organization with the size and complexity of the red cross.
 
2012-11-01 06:44:05 PM
I'll never give a single cent to Red Cross. Why? Because their administrative costs are so astronomically high that very little of your donation even goes to those that need it. My dad used to volunteer with them until he realized all of the bullshiat that was going on.

They're pretty much the Susan G. Komen of disaster relief funds. There are way better organizations to donate your time and money to; it just takes a little more work to find out about them.
 
2012-11-01 06:44:09 PM
The Red Cross is as much a machine for political appointments as any other right wing Christian charity. Are they paid too much? Are their uses for funds uncreative and poorly directed? Like any charity of a certain size, their management is concerned with grant writing and funding proposals. The high pay wouldn't be so bad if there was more emphasis on hiring and doing a job than there is on grant writing. Alas, they are the best we've got. Capitalism is failing. disaster relief should not be about competition, but even charities are forced to be all about competing for money. The problem is not the RC per se, it is a system of life-or-death resources being directed by shiatty, corporate structures. Competition is simply not efficient in every activity human life demands.

And don't even get me started on the farked up right wing Christian community-based funding panels. Holy shiat, they have no idea what people need. it's all about status at the lawn bowling club or at the golf tournaments.
 
2012-11-01 06:46:17 PM
Sandy was caused by a secret weather control weapon the ultra-rightwingers have.
 
2012-11-01 06:47:26 PM

Lost_in_Oregon: Sandy was caused by a secret weather control weapon the ultra-rightwingers have.


The right-wingers control the "gay" weapon?
 
2012-11-01 06:47:39 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


I'll take a different tact, which is quite unusual for me, because I usually like slamming crying assholes. Living through Katrina and the aftermath was different in NOLA because we knew it was going to happen eventually. I mean we really KNEW for a fact that one day we would be farked. I was raised hearing about storms from the 60s and whatnot and everyone else was. Kind of like in the Northeast people are raised to live in massive snow storms and crazy week long blackouts because of the storms. When it snows down here we shut down, like last year, for an entire week.

The average Joe in the Northeast who hasn't left the place and has his snow shovels and snow plows and something in the garage to attach to his F-150 when it snows has no idea what a hurricane really does. You see it on the news sure but you can't FEEL it like you can when you're in it. Just like when I watch people biatching about snow I really don't get it nor do I care to pay attention to the results of major snow storms because "it will never happen to me."

So what we have here is a situation where people see the physical destruction of what boils down to a minor hurricane and they had no idea what it really looked like until now. I've seen hundreds if not thousands of homes personally that were destroyed in various hurricanes. I've lost a home, my brother has lost two, my father has lost one and a half, on and on. I've rebuilt dozens of homes and personally lead a non-profit to rebuild 12 after Katrina. We're used to this shiat just like they're used to crazy ass snow storms.

So in this case I'll empathize with them.
 
2012-11-01 06:49:23 PM

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


I think the head honcho used to get more. I remember reading that Elizabeth Dole was making around 1mill when she was the head. I've seen some places that say that if you count 'perks' it's still in that range.

I stopped giving to the RC when I read that. I continued to give blood while I was able.

Now for disaster relief I give to the Salvation Army.
 
2012-11-01 06:51:44 PM

pxlboy: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

This is why I prefer to donate blood.


Do you have any idea how much blood it would take to put out a wildfire? A LOT!
 
2012-11-01 06:52:20 PM

Pribar: short shiat takes time, deal with it.


Not to mention the Red Cross doesn't have the equipment or personnel to clear roads. A disaster "first responder" isn't the same as what most people think of as a first responder. First ones in are construction crews and, if necessary, National Guard. And that's only after the damage is done.

Second, your survival is their concern; your comfort is not. They will not be bringing in dry socks or give a rat's ass about your cell phone running out of batteries. Potable water if you haven't had a drop to drink in three days, OK.

Finally, they divert donations because they understand the job better than you do. Your generous donation is appreciated, but they have no means or inclination of having it magically appear in the hands of the victims, and even if they did, there's nothing to buy and FEMA got slammed over victims spending the money on non-essentials. When disaster strikes they use what they have, and the donations are used to stock up for the next one. Cash is basically worthless in a disaster area; logistics doesn't work that way. Otherwise they'd be chasing the same last few bottles of water as the victims in the area -- what would be the point of that?

/ Sister worked for the Red Cross
// They're not perfect but FFS they're not Comcast
 
2012-11-01 06:52:44 PM

Pair-o-Dice: Roger, roger. Over, over.

~
I don't know where the hell that's supposed to fit in to the story, but I still laughed. That scene never gets old.

// it's "over Oveur" by the way

// Airplane! pedant 
 
2012-11-01 06:57:03 PM
The people there, the neighbors who had no electricity, were making soup. Making soup. It's very emotional...
i694.photobucket.com

Is chowder still considered "soup"? If so, it's set to be a tragic night of heartbreak at Casa Whiskers.
 
2012-11-01 06:57:54 PM

ga362: I think Bob Dole's wife did rather well working for Red Cross.

Google it.


Didn't she put them in the red for the first time in their existence or some thing to that effect?
 
2012-11-01 06:58:17 PM

lordmoon: LowbrowDeluxe: lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181:

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.

Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.


If you could even get considered for that job, you could get double that in the private sector, easily.
 
2012-11-01 07:00:02 PM

dragonchild: Pribar: short shiat takes time, deal with it.

Not to mention the Red Cross doesn't have the equipment or personnel to clear roads. A disaster "first responder" isn't the same as what most people think of as a first responder. First ones in are construction crews and, if necessary, National Guard. And that's only after the damage is done.

Second, your survival is their concern; your comfort is not. They will not be bringing in dry socks or give a rat's ass about your cell phone running out of batteries. Potable water if you haven't had a drop to drink in three days, OK.

Finally, they divert donations because they understand the job better than you do. Your generous donation is appreciated, but they have no means or inclination of having it magically appear in the hands of the victims, and even if they did, there's nothing to buy and FEMA got slammed over victims spending the money on non-essentials. When disaster strikes they use what they have, and the donations are used to stock up for the next one. Cash is basically worthless in a disaster area; logistics doesn't work that way. Otherwise they'd be chasing the same last few bottles of water as the victims in the area -- what would be the point of that?

/ Sister worked for the Red Cross
// They're not perfect but FFS they're not Comcast


I disagree about the cash thing. My friend's house got hit by a hurricane years ago in Hawaii and he told me how much of an impact it was when FEMA gave him a check for the damages days after the incident. While it might not relieve somethings it does a lot for stress and morale knowing that you are going to be taken care. It's one less than to think about and you can focus on the more immediate. There is actual science that shows that if you toss some money around immediately after a disaster it makes the entire place safer. You have less domestic violence, less hording, and more people willing to help their neighbors.
 
2012-11-01 07:00:15 PM
 
2012-11-01 07:03:13 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for amost everything that was donated to them donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


Amen!

/FTFY anyway.
 
2012-11-01 07:03:26 PM
Like another poster up thread, my grandfather always, always held a grudge against the Red Cross...I think for charging for coffee while in Korea? Maybe?

Anyway, because of his grudge, the money in our family never went to the Red Cross, but to the Salvation Army.

According to this old, out-dated snopes article, the CEO of the Salvation Army makes $13,000 a year plus housing. Which means about $0.93 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes, as opposed to with the Red Cross where approximately $0.13 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes.

But yes, old, out-dated, who knows if it is still accurate.
 
2012-11-01 07:04:17 PM

that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]



Ask almost any WWII vet.
 
2012-11-01 07:04:20 PM
Hmm...let's try the link again.

Link
 
2012-11-01 07:08:42 PM

Rincewind53: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?

I believe all five boroughs have their own presidents. It's basically a glorified homeowners association.

/NYC is always a weird outlier when it comes to things urban.

Yeah, all five boroughs have their own presidents, but it's essentially an advisory role. They used to have more powers, but now they have almost none. City council members have much more power.


The Borough Pres appears to be responsible for the Red Cross keeping the water out of the tunnel.

That's what I got from the article anyway.
 
2012-11-01 07:08:47 PM
Forgive my ignorance, but isn't Staten Island, like, A farkING ISLAND IN THE OCEAN?
 
2012-11-01 07:09:41 PM
They should have called the LDS. They bring a mean relief.
 
2012-11-01 07:12:42 PM
rumpelstiltskin

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.

Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.

If you could even get considered for that job, you could get double that in the private sector, easily.

If you could even get considered for that job, you could get double that in the private sector, easily.
 
2012-11-01 07:12:42 PM
Screw all the charities. I have an unemployed friend in NYC who lost all of her food because she has no power to her fridge. I'm sending her a damned check directly. If you have friends in the area, send them money, period. Who cares if it's not tax deductible? 0% goes to administration and 100% goes to restocking a fridge (and maybe a pack of cigarettes).
 
182
2012-11-01 07:13:58 PM

Head_Shot: Forgive my ignorance, but isn't Staten Island, like, A farkING ISLAND IN THE OCEAN?


dude.
 
2012-11-01 07:14:20 PM
Reports from New Jersey ring like prophecies of the apocalypse. Corpses float hopelessly in what used to be a thriving and distinctive downtown; coffins rise from the ground; alligators, sharks and snakes ply the poisonous waters .

Further discouraging reports out of New Jersey about bands of rapists going from block to block, people walking around in feces, dead bodies floating everywhere. And we know that sniper fire continues.
linky
 
2012-11-01 07:17:21 PM
Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme.
 
2012-11-01 07:19:44 PM
red cross has some well-known administrative issues choking them at this point, something like $0.01 of a $1.00 donation makes it all-the-way-through- . i don't think we should give up on them, though, the majority of the logistics are in place and the name is well-known-. we just gotta prune that tree a bit.
 
2012-11-01 07:21:30 PM

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: They should have called the LDS. They bring a mean relief.


hero tag.
 
2012-11-01 07:24:09 PM

Warthog: Also, I once hooked up with a girl from Staten Island. It was the lowest point in my life.

/This is in fact true.*

*Sadly, it really is.


You think that's bad? I nailed a new jersy girl off and on for 2 years.

/ you know what I mean dammit
 
2012-11-01 07:27:41 PM

ParallelUniverseParking: Yea, we now. All your charity money goes to the NRA and the "Fark alt burn victims reparation fund".


Actually my charity of choice is Doctors Without Borders. What's yours?
 
2012-11-01 07:30:14 PM

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


What have they done wrong?
 
2012-11-01 07:30:52 PM
Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA
 
2012-11-01 07:32:06 PM
Clearly he has confused the Red Cross with The Red Cross. You know, the superhero that can fly around the world at the speed of light, bringing nigh-instantaneous disaster relief to all.

i277.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-01 07:34:33 PM
"You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?"

Sorting Romney's groceries?

Anyway, alerting the nation to your constituents' plight is fine but crying for your volunteers and charity is just a douche move.

Probably should have postponed the marathon.
 
2012-11-01 07:35:19 PM

onomatopoeon: Clearly he has confused the Red Cross with The Red Cross. You know, the superhero that can fly around the world at the speed of light, bringing nigh-instantaneous disaster relief to all.

[i277.photobucket.com image 240x283]


Johnson & Johnson is going to sue that guy's cape off.
 
2012-11-01 07:36:47 PM

Freudian_slipknot: Yeah, I'm not giving a single extra dollar to the Red Cross until they are able to completely prevent all disasters from happening or single-handedly and immediately fix every problem caused by acts of god.

Or, you know, I'll live in reality and be glad we have amazing organizations who are out there doing good work.

/blood donor
//money donor


They're certainly aces at buying phone systems and diverting specific donation programs to internal use.
 
2012-11-01 07:37:00 PM

randomjsa: ParallelUniverseParking: Yea, we now. All your charity money goes to the NRA and the "Fark alt burn victims reparation fund".

Actually my charity of choice is Doctors Without Borders. What's yours?


Too many to list, Elizabeth - you wouldn't approve of many of them. Doctors Without Borders is on it too though. They were my main recipient for Haiti relief donations.
 
2012-11-01 07:37:19 PM
"I need reinforcements, I need troops, man. I need 500 buses, man.

We ain't talking about - you know, one of the briefings we had, they were talking about getting public school bus drivers to come down here and bus people out here. I'm like, "You got to be kidding me. This is a national disaster. Get every doggone Greyhound bus line in the country and get their asses moving to New Jersey."

That's - they're thinking small, man. And this is a major, major, major deal. And I can't emphasize it enough, man. This is crazy. I've got 15,000 to 20,000 people over at the Jersey convention center. It's bursting at the seams. The poor people in Plaquemines Parish. ... We don't have anything, and we're sharing with our brothers in Plaquemines Parish.

It's awful down here, man."


- James Molinaro, Staten Island Borough President
 
2012-11-01 07:37:39 PM

randomjsa: my charity of choice is Doctors Without Borders. What's yours?


I donate directly to single mothers. I only give each of them a couple of bucks though so that I can help more of them.
 
2012-11-01 07:38:04 PM
Its kinda hard to feel sorry for them since they decided to live in hurricane territory.
 
2012-11-01 07:38:22 PM
It's one of those situations that sucks balls and sometimes people feel the need to lash out in frustration in frustration.  That someone in a leadership position would immediately start playing the blame game doens't seem like a very fruitful use of their position of power.
 
Lashing out against one of a handful of relief organizations that has the resources, personnel, and means to actually provide meaningful relief is y dunderheaded.  Maybe pick up a phone and reach out before shooting your own consituency in the foot?
 
2012-11-01 07:41:38 PM

Jack_Knopf: Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA


I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.
 
2012-11-01 07:43:04 PM
What a douche.
 
2012-11-01 07:45:29 PM

dofus: Jack_Knopf: Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA

I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.


And yet... Your bs is only based on the barest hint of truth.
The Red Cross did charge for some things, yes, but at the behest of the military, and for commissary type items only in and around base or camp. Not after a disaster or in relief at a pow camp.

Citation: Link
 
2012-11-01 07:47:11 PM

Urinal Cake Mix: There are way better organizations to donate your time and money to; it just takes a little more work to find out about them.


OK, where can I donate money to help with disaster relief for areas hit by Sandy? Folks here have dissed the Red Cross. The Salvation Army, as I understand it, requires that people participate in religious services to receive aid. Is that true? Do they deny aid to gay people, as others here have claimed?

Is there an American branch of Doctors Without Borders I can send money to?
 
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