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(Politicker)   Staten Island President, "Don't give money to the Red Cross"   (politicker.com) divider line 248
    More: Interesting, Staten Island President, Red Cross, Staten Island, New York City Marathon, Kirsten Gillibrand, drive in  
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21209 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Nov 2012 at 5:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-11-01 01:36:03 PM
Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?
 
2012-11-01 02:01:19 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?


I believe all five boroughs have their own presidents. It's basically a glorified homeowners association.

/NYC is always a weird outlier when it comes to things urban.
 
2012-11-01 02:03:37 PM

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?

I believe all five boroughs have their own presidents. It's basically a glorified homeowners association.

/NYC is always a weird outlier when it comes to things urban.


Yeah, all five boroughs have their own presidents, but it's essentially an advisory role. They used to have more powers, but now they have almost none. City council members have much more power.
 
2012-11-01 03:18:11 PM
Yeah, I'm not giving a single extra dollar to the Red Cross until they are able to completely prevent all disasters from happening or single-handedly and immediately fix every problem caused by acts of god.

Or, you know, I'll live in reality and be glad we have amazing organizations who are out there doing good work.

/blood donor
//money donor
 
2012-11-01 03:21:43 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?


They're like villages in the legal sense.  I used to live in a village of 35,000 people.  We had a president, not a mayor.
 
2012-11-01 03:26:58 PM
"You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?"

Translation:

HOW DARE THEY WAIT UNTIL AFTER THE STORM PASSES TO BEGIN TO ASSESS THE DAMAGE?!?!
 
2012-11-01 03:31:29 PM
I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?
 
2012-11-01 03:42:29 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?


President Staten Island! A hurricane is heading this way!

SHUT
DOWN
EVERYTHING
 
2012-11-01 03:50:28 PM

PainInTheASP: "You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?"

Translation:

HOW DARE THEY WAIT UNTIL AFTER THE STORM PASSES TO BEGIN TO ASSESS THE DAMAGE?!?!


"Assess", lol

/yeah, I know it's the wrong spelling, but that was my first thought when I read his reply
 
2012-11-01 03:51:25 PM
Is it too late to give staten island to jersey?
 
2012-11-01 04:32:32 PM

Dead for Tax Reasons: Is it too late to give staten island to jersey?


Is it too late just to have Staten Island sink into the water?
 
2012-11-01 04:34:24 PM
 
2012-11-01 04:58:10 PM
So much derp on that site.

They seem to have something against soup....
 
2012-11-01 04:59:24 PM
Don't give money to Aquaman either.
 
2012-11-01 05:20:37 PM

xynix: I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?



Yep.  The first responders are the National Guard.
 
When Issac hit down here, they were passing out supplies immediately.  Red Cross didn't come for days.  But that's how its supposed to work.
 
2012-11-01 05:25:59 PM
Charities are an odd thing; people are afraid to badmouth them for fear of being labeled callous even if the charity is essentially a scam.
 
2012-11-01 05:30:56 PM
What's wrong with soup?
 
2012-11-01 05:33:55 PM
Guy who works for me is deeply involved in Red Cross as a volunteer. He's always working with them, setting up shelters and assessing damage after hurricanes and tornadoes. They actually requested he go to New York for two weeks to assist but he had to decline because we've got some big projects going on at work, and while we're more than happy to give him some leeway when it comes to helping them out, two weeks right now is pretty tough.

Talking with him, some Red Cross organizations are run very well, others not so much. It could be that the people who work in locations that are getting hit with disasters on a more frequent basis know how to handle it better than people who don't. No matter how much you practice and drill and do table top exercises. Nothing is quite as tough as the real thing.
 
2012-11-01 05:34:14 PM
Talk about your misplaced anger.
 
2012-11-01 05:36:28 PM
""You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?""

Why were you in a shelter? Why weren't you out there helping with the rebuilding?

OH YEA!! THE farkING STORM WASN'T EVEN OVER YOU farkWIT.
 
2012-11-01 05:36:54 PM
Where was the Red Cross? Isn't that their function? They collect millions of dollars. Whenever there's a drive in Staten Island, we give openly and honestly. Where are they? Where are they?

Wait a minute. This guy works for an organization that purports to protect you and is funded through force. If the Red Cross came out to complain about government response to a disaster and told everyone to stop giving them money, how would that go over?
 
2012-11-01 05:38:07 PM
Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.
 
2012-11-01 05:38:57 PM
An impatient New Yorker? Now I've seen everything!
 
2012-11-01 05:39:06 PM
I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.
 
2012-11-01 05:39:55 PM
He's Right

Good Advice
 
2012-11-01 05:40:02 PM
As John Lennon infamously didn't say, "Instant charity's gonna get you."
 
2012-11-01 05:40:17 PM
Making Soup!
 
2012-11-01 05:41:13 PM

Doc_Gerbil: So much derp on that site.

They seem to have something against soup....


I was wondering if my biases were clouding my opinion on that.
The stench of herp was strong...
 
2012-11-01 05:41:53 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?


[citation needed]
 
2012-11-01 05:43:02 PM
Roger, roger. Over, over.
 
2012-11-01 05:43:08 PM
Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.
 
2012-11-01 05:45:19 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


I remember hearing stories similar to this from my parents/grandparents.
Now, the Salvation Army on the other hand, actually gets their hands dirty, and genuinely help.
Though I'm pretty much agnostic, I do (financially) support the Salvation Army for helping those that most of us would just like to try to pretend don't exist (homeless, drug addicts, abused women, etc.)
 
2012-11-01 05:45:26 PM
I think Bob Dole's wife did rather well working for Red Cross.

Google it.
 
2012-11-01 05:45:34 PM

kmt11: Making Soup!


cdn.sheknows.com
 
2012-11-01 05:46:17 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?


President of Sandy meet:
media.nola.com
President of Katrina and
www.talk1073.com
President of BP and Isaac.
 
2012-11-01 05:47:33 PM

that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]


Notice it was a question. My grandfather told me they did, and he seemed to hold a lifelong grudge against them.

I'll look it up later, when I'm not on a mobile.
 
2012-11-01 05:48:03 PM
I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.
 
2012-11-01 05:48:28 PM
I wonder how Borough President James Molinaro got the job. It doesnt't seen to be on a platform of disaster preparedness.
 
2012-11-01 05:50:06 PM
A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.
 
2012-11-01 05:50:19 PM

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary.


Like some public school administrators. Thanks for your consistent donations.
 
2012-11-01 05:51:09 PM

downstairs: xynix: I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?


Yep.  The first responders are the National Guard.
 
When Issac hit down here, they were passing out supplies immediately.  Red Cross didn't come for days.  But that's how its supposed to work.


thank you
thank you so very much for pointing out what, pretty much everyone with a working brain should be able to figure out.

and his suggestion is to fark THE RED CROSS. Really? REALLY? You honestly think that that is the best use of your time and microphone??

FINE
I am never donating to the red cross again. Or any charity.
Where were they when I got that flat??


sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeshhhhhh what a tool
 
2012-11-01 05:51:32 PM
We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).
 
2012-11-01 05:51:44 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]

Notice it was a question. My grandfather told me they did, and he seemed to hold a lifelong grudge against them.

I'll look it up later, when I'm not on a mobile.


Snopes says, TRUE (kinda).
 
2012-11-01 05:53:02 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


Nobody complained how FEMA handled Katrina. Nobody at all...

But yeah, even before Sandy hit, NJ people were asking Bon Jovi and Bruce for a charity concert. WTF.
 
2012-11-01 05:53:08 PM
Hilarious, when Romney wants govt out of services.... who needs FEMA when you have the red cross?
 
2012-11-01 05:53:10 PM
""It is as t'e borough president, Jim Molinaro, said, it's disgusting, it really is,' State Senator Andy Lanza said, criticizing the city for giving the go-ahead to the New York City Marathon this weekend and the focus on pumping the water out of the East River tunnels. 'We're talking about getting water of the tunnel. Let's get the water out of the tunnel tomorrow, let's get the people out of the water today. "

Yeah, because opening thoroughfares that trucks loaded with supplies can traverse IS COMPLETELY UNRELATED TO HELPING PEOPLE.
 
2012-11-01 05:53:29 PM

kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.


so dont donate to any large charities? anyone working for a charity should do for free?
I dont understand your point. How many families/houses were destroyed?
please give us the math.
thanks
 
2012-11-01 05:54:34 PM
But it is ok for me to give the red cross nurse the money directly for services rendered.

files.coloribus.com
 
2012-11-01 05:54:42 PM
I thought it was that the Red Cross sucks but the American Red Cross doesn't. Do I have that backwards, or do they both suck now?
 
2012-11-01 05:54:43 PM
Honestly, there is enough controversy associated with their handling of funds that I never would anyway. There are plenty of other organizations out there.
 
2012-11-01 05:54:54 PM

kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.


This is why I prefer to donate blood.
 
2012-11-01 05:55:18 PM

faultytower: Is it too late just to have Staten Island sink into the water?


Too soon, man.
 
2012-11-01 05:58:30 PM

pxlboy: This is why I prefer to donate blood.


Let's start a rumor:

Red Cross administrators drink, on average, 36% of donated blood. After you account for spillage and theft, less than 30% makes it to needy individuals.
 
2012-11-01 05:58:50 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]

Notice it was a question. My grandfather told me they did, and he seemed to hold a lifelong grudge against them.

I'll look it up later, when I'm not on a mobile.


a story from the beginning of the year... Link he was probably angry about this, as most of the service men were
 
2012-11-01 05:59:15 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


My father was on the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) when an aircraft blew up on the flight deck. The Red Cross and the Salvation Army were brought to the ship for disaster relief. The Salvation Army provided soup and coffee. The Red Cross sold donuts.

/NSCSB
 
2012-11-01 05:59:20 PM

namatad: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

so dont donate to any large charities? anyone working for a charity should do for free?
I dont understand your point. How many families/houses were destroyed?
please give us the math.
thanks


Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.
 
2012-11-01 05:59:25 PM

that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]


I was going to go with a simple "WUT?"
But I too would enjoy reading about this further...
 
2012-11-01 05:59:41 PM
Well, the Red Cross did pull some fraudulent shiat after 9/11... I don't trust still don't trust them due to that, I'd imagine many New Yorkers would feel the same.
 
2012-11-01 06:00:09 PM

freewill: pxlboy: This is why I prefer to donate blood.

Let's start a rumor:

Red Cross administrators drink, on average, 36% of donated blood. After you account for spillage and theft, less than 30% makes it to needy individuals.


upload.wikimedia.org

/agrees, but thinks it's a vampire pyramid scheme
 
2012-11-01 06:02:00 PM
Does this guy even know how emergency response works? Yikes. Talk about trying to hurt one of the few remaining service organizations by slandering them for something they cannot control.
 
2012-11-01 06:02:17 PM
They waste money on crack.
 
2012-11-01 06:03:26 PM
Get on a bus to Houston.
 
2012-11-01 06:04:36 PM
I haven't given a penny to the Red Cross since I learned that they played the leading role in creating the AIDS epidemic.
 
2012-11-01 06:04:48 PM

filter: Hilarious, when Romney wants govt out of services.... who needs FEMA when you have the red cross?


Yeah. We can just get rid of FEMA and let the states and charities handle everything. Oh, wait, the Red Cross sucks now, too? Oh well, EVERY MAN FOR HIMSELF!
 
2012-11-01 06:05:26 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?


He came to power after the Apocalypse .
 
2012-11-01 06:05:36 PM

Captain_Ballbeard: I haven't given a penny to the Red Cross since I learned that they played the leading role in creating the AIDS epidemic.


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-11-01 06:06:12 PM

Burning_Monk: Zarquon's Flat Tire: that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]

Notice it was a question. My grandfather told me they did, and he seemed to hold a lifelong grudge against them.

I'll look it up later, when I'm not on a mobile.

Snopes says, TRUE (kinda).


Thanks, knowing my grandfather he was probably pissed about ciggarette part.
 
2012-11-01 06:06:51 PM

Dead for Tax Reasons: Is it too late to give staten island to jersey?


They tried. Jersey didn't want it.

/This is in fact true.*

*I do not know whether or not this is true.
 
2012-11-01 06:07:47 PM
Also, I once hooked up with a girl from Staten Island. It was the lowest point in my life.

/This is in fact true.*

*Sadly, it really is.
 
2012-11-01 06:07:59 PM

lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

so dont donate to any large charities? anyone working for a charity should do for free?
I dont understand your point. How many families/houses were destroyed?
please give us the math.
thanks

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.


I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.
 
2012-11-01 06:09:35 PM

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


Yea, we now. All your charity money goes to the NRA and the "Fark alt burn victims reparation fund".
 
2012-11-01 06:09:36 PM
I was at the South Shore yesterday, people were buried in their homes. There the dogs are trying to find bodies. The people there, the neighbors who had no electricity, were making soup. Making soup.

No hurricane relief for you! Come back one year!

/NEXT
 
2012-11-01 06:09:52 PM
The Red Cross screwed NY after 9/11, so why should it be any different now?

They're a fundraising organization at this point. They have huge administrative expenses, and really are more of a brand than a relief organization. They do, however, have an excellent media outreach organization, which is what matters.

The salvation army does a much better job for substantially less.
 
2012-11-01 06:10:14 PM

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


No, they don't.
 
2012-11-01 06:10:37 PM

filter: Hilarious, when Romney wants govt out of services.... who needs FEMA when you have the red cross?


==========

Ah yes, this is a fine example of how the "invisible hand" has the answer to all problems. I'm sure the Red Cross is hauling industrial sized pumps up to NYC as we speak to pump the sea water out of the tunnels. Who needs Big FEMA Bird?
 
2012-11-01 06:11:29 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]

Notice it was a question. My grandfather told me they did, and he seemed to hold a lifelong grudge against them.

I'll look it up later, when I'm not on a mobile.


Just don't ask him about the farking donuts.
 
2012-11-01 06:11:55 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.



Nice generalization. Would you expect to hear all that much from the majority non-whining portion of the population? Crowds of people swarming reporters to yell into the cameras "DOIN' FINE!!!"?

/Yes, this guy is obviously an idiot with a bunch of misplaced frustration
 
2012-11-01 06:12:02 PM
My boyfriend and I were recently discussing taking some renewal courses for CPR and First Aid Training. I also wanted to get certification for Pet First Aid, as we have two cats and a blind basset hound (my baby girl, Stormin' Norma Jean... the pic in my profile is a couple of years ago before she had both eyes removed due to severe glaucoma). So I called the local Red Cross Chapter here in Pierre. Turns out that they do not even have enough volunteers to keep the office open on most days, much less to hold classes.

So, like everything else in this state, I would have to drive a few hours to take a couple of courses that I could read the literature and probably find videos online to self-teach. Sure, I won't have that card that says I know what I am doing, but if my bf drops to the ground and stops breathing, that piece of paper isn't as important as helping him until the professionals can.

/going for a 911 call center position.... probably get certified that way, anywho
 
2012-11-01 06:12:46 PM
Oh no, they didn't have fresh shoes and socks as people arrived to the shelters! Jesus, usually they see what people need then get it to them, but now they have to anticipate and have everything there or NOT A PENNY FOR THEM! Why don't you wait for the Romney bus then?
 
2012-11-01 06:13:59 PM

xynix: I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?


Pretty much this. I remember people skipping the Red Cross for other charities during the Haiti earthquake because of the idea that they simply didn't work fast enough. And frankly, they don't. However--they do end up providing the relief the other charities in the case of Haiti accidentally lost. Or couldn't account for.
 
2012-11-01 06:14:03 PM
This is inevitable. Organizations like the Red Cross are going to put their money where it can do the most good, and they can't be everywhere. Situations where people who gave money see that money go elsewhere even when they are in need are going to happen. If you want to make sure your money only gets spent on you, don't donate it. If you want to make sure it only gets spent locally, only donate it to local area organizations.
 
2012-11-01 06:14:13 PM
Hello. My name is James Molinaro. I have a burning desire to be remembered as a nitwit for shooting off my mouth about a natural disaster.
 
2012-11-01 06:18:07 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


I don't know about that, but my Great Uncle was at Pearl when it was bombed and the farking Red Cross was charging sailors $.10 a cup for coffee ($0.10 in 1941 had the same buying power as $1.60 in 2012. Annual inflation over this period was 3.98% Source). All the rest of the years of his life, he didn't have a nice thing to say about them. I'm guessing he saw much worse than the coffee incident, but being the gentleman he was, he just didn't discuss it.
 
2012-11-01 06:19:13 PM
a3.ec-images.myspacecdn.com
 
2012-11-01 06:19:27 PM

GoldDude: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.

I remember hearing stories similar to this from my parents/grandparents.
Now, the Salvation Army on the other hand, actually gets their hands dirty, and genuinely help.
Though I'm pretty much agnostic, I do (financially) support the Salvation Army for helping those that most of us would just like to try to pretend don't exist (homeless, drug addicts, abused women, etc.)


... Unless they're gay.
 
2012-11-01 06:19:39 PM

LowbrowDeluxe: lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181:

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.


Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.
 
2012-11-01 06:20:42 PM

Warthog: Also, I once hooked up with a girl from Staten Island. It was the lowest point in my life.

/This is in fact true.*

*Sadly, it really is.


I've taken visitors on the obligatory Staten Island Ferry ride many times.

I should really leave the terminal and take a walk sometime.

JerkStore: However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


The first time something like this ever happens to your community, it feels that way. It just does. No matter how many times you've seen it on the news, it feels a little bit like the apocalypse has come and nobody cares.

Also, I think virtually everybody in America was being a crybaby after Katrina, but especially local officials, stamping their feet and avoiding accountability as fast as they could.
 
2012-11-01 06:21:25 PM
my Dad was a Marine in WWII. on his last day of service he and others were lined up ready to go when they got shook down for $10.00 a head to cover the cost of a shaving kit or some b.s. that the Red Cross supposedly gave the servicemen. my Dad hated the R.C. from that day on. $10 was a lot of money to a guy back then, especially when the bulk of your pay went home to feed your brothers and sisters.

/better dead than Red
 
2012-11-01 06:23:12 PM

PainInTheASP: "You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?"

Translation:

HOW DARE THEY WAIT UNTIL AFTER THE STORM PASSES TO BEGIN TO ASSESS THE DAMAGE?!?!


Remember, these *are* New Yorkers we're talking about....
 
2012-11-01 06:24:43 PM
Had an Uncle who said never to give a dime to the Red Cross.

He was working as a EU Government official in the 90's and was stationed in Kenya/ Somalia. Somalia was deep in a humanitarian crisis and the Red Cross had collected large amounts of money for relief. What the RCdid was rent out suites for all staff at the at the Hilton in Nairobi and then proceeded to spend every last dime that had been dedicated for relief on living like kings and taking private jets to attend conferences to talk about relief in Somalia. As soon as the money ran out they all packed up and went home having never helped anyone but themselves and never having set foot in Somalia. They spent millions.
 
2012-11-01 06:26:38 PM

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


your a weird bugger to read.

that being said... yeah wtf is this guy railing on about? i read his blurb through drudge earlier today and i still don't get it.

i see your point that not all charities are equal/actually charitable, and the red cross has HAD to repeat MANY times over the last few years that 'todays' donations go to tomorrows disaster... so what put a bug up this guys individual butt is my question. is he really that butthurt over manhattan having precedence, or maybe priority in response effort? or are you just as cynical as i am and don't donate anything to anyone?

i just don't understand mr envirodude and would like your help guiding the unbridled rage.
 
2012-11-01 06:29:18 PM

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.


This.
 
2012-11-01 06:29:50 PM
The Red Cross jumped the shark ages ago. Thievin' carnts.

They got pinged for some major league diversion of funds regarding a recent-ish disaster appeal over here. Of course when they realised something was amiss with their accounting got caught the Red Cross held a sombre press conference and said they were very very sorry. So sorry that they blatantly piggybacked a disaster to get some revenue stream thickening. So very very sorry. Please can we have more money now.

Nothing but the best for their management level staff [and not just the Red Cross - it's sickeningly rife]. Malcolm Fraser, ex PM and founder of *laughs* Care Australia, once jumped on a near empty jet on his charity's coin coz he needed to get to a meeting. Unrepentant he was, too. Carnt.

Although it doesn't always pay to fly 1st class when you're swanning around to your important charity meetings at 5 star hotels. 

// apologies for the complete lack of links, gym in 26
 
2012-11-01 06:33:04 PM
There is a problem here and a lot of people are clueless.

The Red Cross is a first responder.

Their mission is to provide services as soon as possible. For disasters that had some early notice their people and resources are moved into secure areas in advance so that they can provide aid and support immediately. While they do provide ongoing support, they have always been first responders. They even have joint authority with FEMA.
 
2012-11-01 06:35:17 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).


Cancer sticks and diabetes gateway drugs?
 
2012-11-01 06:35:34 PM
This thread has been most educational.
 
2012-11-01 06:36:41 PM

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.


Exactly Autism Speaks is one of them. PLEASE Do not donate to them Try ASAN instead!
 
2012-11-01 06:37:32 PM

lordmoon: Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.


That's less than a veteran journeyman reliever on a mediocre small-market MLB roster. To run a worldwide aid organization. Someone with those capabilities could easily make ten times that. Running the Red Cross isn't what I'd call a quick way to get rich.

If the Red Cross has any serious scandals I'm all ears, but I've yet to hear of one that clears the derp.
 
2012-11-01 06:39:40 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


You don't hear too many complaints coming out of Manhattan. It turns out all those crazy taxes they pay actually did something.
 
2012-11-01 06:39:58 PM

madgonad: There is a problem here and a lot of people are clueless.

The Red Cross is a first responder.

Their mission is to provide services as soon as possible. For disasters that had some early notice their people and resources are moved into secure areas in advance so that they can provide aid and support immediately. While they do provide ongoing support, they have always been first responders. They even have joint authority with FEMA.


That's what I thought I heard from volunteers here who are constantly describing themselves as first responders with training (then when you give them a blank stare, they say, "we're Red Cross.")

I_C_Weener: Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).

Cancer sticks and diabetes gateway drugs?


Yeah - well, he says the chocolate was more the consistency of ex-lax. He also complains about them charging for other services and his brother, who was in the Pacific, came back with a real dislike of them (and he was always a mild guy who liked most people and organizations).

I have many friends who are with the Salvation Army and while I respect their model to some degree, the crazy religiosity behind it (particularly their anti-gay sermons, teachings and policies) really bug. My friend is actually a mental health service provider who is S.A. and treats S.A. officers with, let's say, mental health problems (alcohol mostly). Not that you can't have a charity run by alcoholics! Most any organization can be well run by alcoholics, amirite?
 
2012-11-01 06:40:10 PM
I haven't heard much of what happened to Staten Island, but shouldn't the blame be more on Bloomberg or OEM than the Red Cross?
 
2012-11-01 06:41:13 PM
I was part of the relief force staged by FEMA for Katrina, a LOT of misinformation has been spread about that and since it ties in with this story here goes. We were staged just west of Tallahassee, Fl (as close to the path of the storm as we dared get, we would do no one any good if we got caught in the storm and ended up as casualties ourselves) when the storm passed word came down that New Orleans (the primary response zone for most of us) had suffered moderate damage so about 70% of us were reassigned to towns in Mississippi, many of which had been totally obliterated, we rolled on those orders and it wasn't until hours later that word came down that the levees had failed and NO was flooded, by then most of us had already passed beyond recall range (cell and landlines were spotty at best and most of us only had VHF radios good for local comms only) so yes response to the New Orleans disaster could have been better but what was overlooked in the blame game is that local authorities are supposed to be responsible for disaster relief in the first 48 hours after a event, it takes time for large scale relief convoys to get into place, roads have to be made safe (power lines, trees, and other obstacles cleared, bridges inspected to make sure our vehicles don't collapse em etc) fuel supplies have to be coordinated (big rigs drink diesel to the tune of 6 to 8 MPG), etc. in short shiat takes time, deal with it.

Unlike tornadoes and earthquakes, storms like Katrina and Sandy build over days if not weeks so there is NO excuse for not being prepared for them, if one is headed even remotely in your direction get at LEAST 3 days worth of food, water and meds for everyone in your household and your pets, if you live in low lying ares (Cough Staten Island Cough) get out, storm surge is no joke its better to look like chicken little and run than to realize that surge is not the same as a burst pipe, its not just water, it is what a storm has picked up in the last 1000 farking miles and is pushing ahead of it, your brick home may be sturdy but it cant stop a barge being pushed by 100,000,000 gallons of water, and if by some miracle it does, do you really want to be waist deep in the leavings of every septic tank and waste water treatment plant from 3 states?


/ya ya CSB, TL;DR etc blow me
 
2012-11-01 06:41:50 PM

Arkanaut: I haven't heard much of what happened to Staten Island, but shouldn't the blame be more on Bloomberg or OEM than the Red Cross?


Or Sandy. That biatch.
 
2012-11-01 06:42:22 PM

freewill:

The first time something like this ever happens to your community, it feels that way. It just does. No matter how many times you've seen it on the news, it feels a little bit like the apocalypse has come and nobody cares.


This!

Had a small disaster - micro burst destroyed all 30 full-grown trees on my property - and I wanted to throw rocks at every asshole who drove by to see the storm damage.
 
2012-11-01 06:42:52 PM

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.


Yeah. Let's get a guy making $45 an hour to run an organization with a budget in the billions. Great idea.

Now if we were talking about The United Way, then sure, I think they have way too much bloat over there but I don't think 500k is too much to pay a guy to run an organization with the size and complexity of the red cross.
 
2012-11-01 06:44:05 PM
I'll never give a single cent to Red Cross. Why? Because their administrative costs are so astronomically high that very little of your donation even goes to those that need it. My dad used to volunteer with them until he realized all of the bullshiat that was going on.

They're pretty much the Susan G. Komen of disaster relief funds. There are way better organizations to donate your time and money to; it just takes a little more work to find out about them.
 
2012-11-01 06:44:09 PM
The Red Cross is as much a machine for political appointments as any other right wing Christian charity. Are they paid too much? Are their uses for funds uncreative and poorly directed? Like any charity of a certain size, their management is concerned with grant writing and funding proposals. The high pay wouldn't be so bad if there was more emphasis on hiring and doing a job than there is on grant writing. Alas, they are the best we've got. Capitalism is failing. disaster relief should not be about competition, but even charities are forced to be all about competing for money. The problem is not the RC per se, it is a system of life-or-death resources being directed by shiatty, corporate structures. Competition is simply not efficient in every activity human life demands.

And don't even get me started on the farked up right wing Christian community-based funding panels. Holy shiat, they have no idea what people need. it's all about status at the lawn bowling club or at the golf tournaments.
 
2012-11-01 06:46:17 PM
Sandy was caused by a secret weather control weapon the ultra-rightwingers have.
 
2012-11-01 06:47:26 PM

Lost_in_Oregon: Sandy was caused by a secret weather control weapon the ultra-rightwingers have.


The right-wingers control the "gay" weapon?
 
2012-11-01 06:47:39 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


I'll take a different tact, which is quite unusual for me, because I usually like slamming crying assholes. Living through Katrina and the aftermath was different in NOLA because we knew it was going to happen eventually. I mean we really KNEW for a fact that one day we would be farked. I was raised hearing about storms from the 60s and whatnot and everyone else was. Kind of like in the Northeast people are raised to live in massive snow storms and crazy week long blackouts because of the storms. When it snows down here we shut down, like last year, for an entire week.

The average Joe in the Northeast who hasn't left the place and has his snow shovels and snow plows and something in the garage to attach to his F-150 when it snows has no idea what a hurricane really does. You see it on the news sure but you can't FEEL it like you can when you're in it. Just like when I watch people biatching about snow I really don't get it nor do I care to pay attention to the results of major snow storms because "it will never happen to me."

So what we have here is a situation where people see the physical destruction of what boils down to a minor hurricane and they had no idea what it really looked like until now. I've seen hundreds if not thousands of homes personally that were destroyed in various hurricanes. I've lost a home, my brother has lost two, my father has lost one and a half, on and on. I've rebuilt dozens of homes and personally lead a non-profit to rebuild 12 after Katrina. We're used to this shiat just like they're used to crazy ass snow storms.

So in this case I'll empathize with them.
 
2012-11-01 06:49:23 PM

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


I think the head honcho used to get more. I remember reading that Elizabeth Dole was making around 1mill when she was the head. I've seen some places that say that if you count 'perks' it's still in that range.

I stopped giving to the RC when I read that. I continued to give blood while I was able.

Now for disaster relief I give to the Salvation Army.
 
2012-11-01 06:51:44 PM

pxlboy: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

This is why I prefer to donate blood.


Do you have any idea how much blood it would take to put out a wildfire? A LOT!
 
2012-11-01 06:52:20 PM

Pribar: short shiat takes time, deal with it.


Not to mention the Red Cross doesn't have the equipment or personnel to clear roads. A disaster "first responder" isn't the same as what most people think of as a first responder. First ones in are construction crews and, if necessary, National Guard. And that's only after the damage is done.

Second, your survival is their concern; your comfort is not. They will not be bringing in dry socks or give a rat's ass about your cell phone running out of batteries. Potable water if you haven't had a drop to drink in three days, OK.

Finally, they divert donations because they understand the job better than you do. Your generous donation is appreciated, but they have no means or inclination of having it magically appear in the hands of the victims, and even if they did, there's nothing to buy and FEMA got slammed over victims spending the money on non-essentials. When disaster strikes they use what they have, and the donations are used to stock up for the next one. Cash is basically worthless in a disaster area; logistics doesn't work that way. Otherwise they'd be chasing the same last few bottles of water as the victims in the area -- what would be the point of that?

/ Sister worked for the Red Cross
// They're not perfect but FFS they're not Comcast
 
2012-11-01 06:52:44 PM

Pair-o-Dice: Roger, roger. Over, over.

~
I don't know where the hell that's supposed to fit in to the story, but I still laughed. That scene never gets old.

// it's "over Oveur" by the way

// Airplane! pedant 
 
2012-11-01 06:57:03 PM
The people there, the neighbors who had no electricity, were making soup. Making soup. It's very emotional...
i694.photobucket.com

Is chowder still considered "soup"? If so, it's set to be a tragic night of heartbreak at Casa Whiskers.
 
2012-11-01 06:57:54 PM

ga362: I think Bob Dole's wife did rather well working for Red Cross.

Google it.


Didn't she put them in the red for the first time in their existence or some thing to that effect?
 
2012-11-01 06:58:17 PM

lordmoon: LowbrowDeluxe: lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181:

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.

Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.


If you could even get considered for that job, you could get double that in the private sector, easily.
 
2012-11-01 07:00:02 PM

dragonchild: Pribar: short shiat takes time, deal with it.

Not to mention the Red Cross doesn't have the equipment or personnel to clear roads. A disaster "first responder" isn't the same as what most people think of as a first responder. First ones in are construction crews and, if necessary, National Guard. And that's only after the damage is done.

Second, your survival is their concern; your comfort is not. They will not be bringing in dry socks or give a rat's ass about your cell phone running out of batteries. Potable water if you haven't had a drop to drink in three days, OK.

Finally, they divert donations because they understand the job better than you do. Your generous donation is appreciated, but they have no means or inclination of having it magically appear in the hands of the victims, and even if they did, there's nothing to buy and FEMA got slammed over victims spending the money on non-essentials. When disaster strikes they use what they have, and the donations are used to stock up for the next one. Cash is basically worthless in a disaster area; logistics doesn't work that way. Otherwise they'd be chasing the same last few bottles of water as the victims in the area -- what would be the point of that?

/ Sister worked for the Red Cross
// They're not perfect but FFS they're not Comcast


I disagree about the cash thing. My friend's house got hit by a hurricane years ago in Hawaii and he told me how much of an impact it was when FEMA gave him a check for the damages days after the incident. While it might not relieve somethings it does a lot for stress and morale knowing that you are going to be taken care. It's one less than to think about and you can focus on the more immediate. There is actual science that shows that if you toss some money around immediately after a disaster it makes the entire place safer. You have less domestic violence, less hording, and more people willing to help their neighbors.
 
2012-11-01 07:00:15 PM
 
2012-11-01 07:03:13 PM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for amost everything that was donated to them donated bandages in WWII?

fark em.


Amen!

/FTFY anyway.
 
2012-11-01 07:03:26 PM
Like another poster up thread, my grandfather always, always held a grudge against the Red Cross...I think for charging for coffee while in Korea? Maybe?

Anyway, because of his grudge, the money in our family never went to the Red Cross, but to the Salvation Army.

According to this old, out-dated snopes article, the CEO of the Salvation Army makes $13,000 a year plus housing. Which means about $0.93 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes, as opposed to with the Red Cross where approximately $0.13 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes.

But yes, old, out-dated, who knows if it is still accurate.
 
2012-11-01 07:04:17 PM

that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]



Ask almost any WWII vet.
 
2012-11-01 07:04:20 PM
Hmm...let's try the link again.

Link
 
2012-11-01 07:08:42 PM

Rincewind53: Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: Atypical Person Reading Fark: Didn't know Staten Island had its own president. Did that happen recently?

I believe all five boroughs have their own presidents. It's basically a glorified homeowners association.

/NYC is always a weird outlier when it comes to things urban.

Yeah, all five boroughs have their own presidents, but it's essentially an advisory role. They used to have more powers, but now they have almost none. City council members have much more power.


The Borough Pres appears to be responsible for the Red Cross keeping the water out of the tunnel.

That's what I got from the article anyway.
 
2012-11-01 07:08:47 PM
Forgive my ignorance, but isn't Staten Island, like, A farkING ISLAND IN THE OCEAN?
 
2012-11-01 07:09:41 PM
They should have called the LDS. They bring a mean relief.
 
2012-11-01 07:12:42 PM
rumpelstiltskin

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.

Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.

If you could even get considered for that job, you could get double that in the private sector, easily.

If you could even get considered for that job, you could get double that in the private sector, easily.
 
2012-11-01 07:12:42 PM
Screw all the charities. I have an unemployed friend in NYC who lost all of her food because she has no power to her fridge. I'm sending her a damned check directly. If you have friends in the area, send them money, period. Who cares if it's not tax deductible? 0% goes to administration and 100% goes to restocking a fridge (and maybe a pack of cigarettes).
 
182
2012-11-01 07:13:58 PM

Head_Shot: Forgive my ignorance, but isn't Staten Island, like, A farkING ISLAND IN THE OCEAN?


dude.
 
2012-11-01 07:14:20 PM
Reports from New Jersey ring like prophecies of the apocalypse. Corpses float hopelessly in what used to be a thriving and distinctive downtown; coffins rise from the ground; alligators, sharks and snakes ply the poisonous waters .

Further discouraging reports out of New Jersey about bands of rapists going from block to block, people walking around in feces, dead bodies floating everywhere. And we know that sniper fire continues.
linky
 
2012-11-01 07:17:21 PM
Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme.
 
2012-11-01 07:19:44 PM
red cross has some well-known administrative issues choking them at this point, something like $0.01 of a $1.00 donation makes it all-the-way-through- . i don't think we should give up on them, though, the majority of the logistics are in place and the name is well-known-. we just gotta prune that tree a bit.
 
2012-11-01 07:21:30 PM

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: They should have called the LDS. They bring a mean relief.


hero tag.
 
2012-11-01 07:24:09 PM

Warthog: Also, I once hooked up with a girl from Staten Island. It was the lowest point in my life.

/This is in fact true.*

*Sadly, it really is.


You think that's bad? I nailed a new jersy girl off and on for 2 years.

/ you know what I mean dammit
 
2012-11-01 07:27:41 PM

ParallelUniverseParking: Yea, we now. All your charity money goes to the NRA and the "Fark alt burn victims reparation fund".


Actually my charity of choice is Doctors Without Borders. What's yours?
 
2012-11-01 07:30:14 PM

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


What have they done wrong?
 
2012-11-01 07:30:52 PM
Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA
 
2012-11-01 07:32:06 PM
Clearly he has confused the Red Cross with The Red Cross. You know, the superhero that can fly around the world at the speed of light, bringing nigh-instantaneous disaster relief to all.

i277.photobucket.com
 
2012-11-01 07:34:33 PM
"You know, I went to a shelter Monday night after the storm. People were coming in with no socks, with no shoes. They were in desperate need. Their housing was destroyed. They were crying. Where was the Red Cross?"

Sorting Romney's groceries?

Anyway, alerting the nation to your constituents' plight is fine but crying for your volunteers and charity is just a douche move.

Probably should have postponed the marathon.
 
2012-11-01 07:35:19 PM

onomatopoeon: Clearly he has confused the Red Cross with The Red Cross. You know, the superhero that can fly around the world at the speed of light, bringing nigh-instantaneous disaster relief to all.

[i277.photobucket.com image 240x283]


Johnson & Johnson is going to sue that guy's cape off.
 
2012-11-01 07:36:47 PM

Freudian_slipknot: Yeah, I'm not giving a single extra dollar to the Red Cross until they are able to completely prevent all disasters from happening or single-handedly and immediately fix every problem caused by acts of god.

Or, you know, I'll live in reality and be glad we have amazing organizations who are out there doing good work.

/blood donor
//money donor


They're certainly aces at buying phone systems and diverting specific donation programs to internal use.
 
2012-11-01 07:37:00 PM

randomjsa: ParallelUniverseParking: Yea, we now. All your charity money goes to the NRA and the "Fark alt burn victims reparation fund".

Actually my charity of choice is Doctors Without Borders. What's yours?


Too many to list, Elizabeth - you wouldn't approve of many of them. Doctors Without Borders is on it too though. They were my main recipient for Haiti relief donations.
 
2012-11-01 07:37:19 PM
"I need reinforcements, I need troops, man. I need 500 buses, man.

We ain't talking about - you know, one of the briefings we had, they were talking about getting public school bus drivers to come down here and bus people out here. I'm like, "You got to be kidding me. This is a national disaster. Get every doggone Greyhound bus line in the country and get their asses moving to New Jersey."

That's - they're thinking small, man. And this is a major, major, major deal. And I can't emphasize it enough, man. This is crazy. I've got 15,000 to 20,000 people over at the Jersey convention center. It's bursting at the seams. The poor people in Plaquemines Parish. ... We don't have anything, and we're sharing with our brothers in Plaquemines Parish.

It's awful down here, man."


- James Molinaro, Staten Island Borough President
 
2012-11-01 07:37:39 PM

randomjsa: my charity of choice is Doctors Without Borders. What's yours?


I donate directly to single mothers. I only give each of them a couple of bucks though so that I can help more of them.
 
2012-11-01 07:38:04 PM
Its kinda hard to feel sorry for them since they decided to live in hurricane territory.
 
2012-11-01 07:38:22 PM
It's one of those situations that sucks balls and sometimes people feel the need to lash out in frustration in frustration.  That someone in a leadership position would immediately start playing the blame game doens't seem like a very fruitful use of their position of power.
 
Lashing out against one of a handful of relief organizations that has the resources, personnel, and means to actually provide meaningful relief is y dunderheaded.  Maybe pick up a phone and reach out before shooting your own consituency in the foot?
 
2012-11-01 07:41:38 PM

Jack_Knopf: Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA


I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.
 
2012-11-01 07:43:04 PM
What a douche.
 
2012-11-01 07:45:29 PM

dofus: Jack_Knopf: Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA

I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.


And yet... Your bs is only based on the barest hint of truth.
The Red Cross did charge for some things, yes, but at the behest of the military, and for commissary type items only in and around base or camp. Not after a disaster or in relief at a pow camp.

Citation: Link
 
2012-11-01 07:47:11 PM

Urinal Cake Mix: There are way better organizations to donate your time and money to; it just takes a little more work to find out about them.


OK, where can I donate money to help with disaster relief for areas hit by Sandy? Folks here have dissed the Red Cross. The Salvation Army, as I understand it, requires that people participate in religious services to receive aid. Is that true? Do they deny aid to gay people, as others here have claimed?

Is there an American branch of Doctors Without Borders I can send money to?
 
2012-11-01 07:50:18 PM

lordmoon: I have a hard time donating cash to any "nonprofit" organization where some of its members make a six-plus figure salary. Blood and goods are okay though.


The difference is, it is an international organization, serving 95+ nations, with over 90+ million volunteers. Surprise, that requires more overhead than a local soup kitchen with 10 people and 50 customers.

The still have 92% charity ratio (expenses to services provided) and are highly rated by independent charity watch organizations. 

I just don't understand why naive people are so hateful about the red cross.
 
2012-11-01 07:51:28 PM
Jst from reading the article I sense a deep animosity and profound jeolousy of staten islanites against manhattanites.

Not sure if it's true or not.
 
2012-11-01 07:53:26 PM

Jack_Knopf: Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA


I think we're gonna need a citation for that. Not saying your sgf was bs'ing, but he may have been repeating an apocryphal story. The Red Cross gathered info for all POWs, and I'm pretty sure they didn't get billed for their packages. Maybe you should do some actual research before withholding support for a valuable organisation.

dofus:
I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.


So the Red Cross wanted to bill you? Do tell. Also, I don't think anyone was lining up to bash the Sally Ann.
 
2012-11-01 07:53:56 PM
Sometimes, when bad publicity comes, agencies work extra hard as opposed to acting butt hurt.

If the Red Cross is the mature aid organization it wants to be, it will put the President's remarks into context. Can't be the first time that people are all bent out of shape after a disaster.
 
2012-11-01 07:56:20 PM

Pribar: I was part of the relief force staged by FEMA for Katrina, a LOT of misinformation has been spread about that and since it ties in with this story here goes. We were staged just west of Tallahassee, Fl (as close to the path of the storm as we dared get, we would do no one any good if we got caught in the storm and ended up as casualties ourselves) when the storm passed word came down that New Orleans (the primary response zone for most of us) had suffered moderate damage so about 70% of us were reassigned to towns in Mississippi, many of which had been totally obliterated, we rolled on those orders and it wasn't until hours later that word came down that the levees had failed and NO was flooded, by then most of us had already passed beyond recall range (cell and landlines were spotty at best and most of us only had VHF radios good for local comms only) so yes response to the New Orleans disaster could have been better but what was overlooked in the blame game is that local authorities are supposed to be responsible for disaster relief in the first 48 hours after a event, it takes time for large scale relief convoys to get into place, roads have to be made safe (power lines, trees, and other obstacles cleared, bridges inspected to make sure our vehicles don't collapse em etc) fuel supplies have to be coordinated (big rigs drink diesel to the tune of 6 to 8 MPG), etc. in short shiat takes time, deal with it.

Unlike tornadoes and earthquakes, storms like Katrina and Sandy build over days if not weeks so there is NO excuse for not being prepared for them, if one is headed even remotely in your direction get at LEAST 3 days worth of food, water and meds for everyone in your household and your pets, if you live in low lying ares (Cough Staten Island Cough) get out, storm surge is no joke its better to look like chicken little and run than to realize that surge is not the same as a burst pipe, its not just water, it is what a storm has picked up in the last 1000 farking m ...


On the contrary, thanks for the anecdote/info.
 
2012-11-01 07:57:27 PM

msupf: dofus: Jack_Knopf: Here comes a CSB...

My stepfather's father (stepgrandfather??) was in Africa during WW2. The base was overrun and the very few survivors were sent to Italy for detainment. I'm not sure how long they were there, but when the war was over they were released. As they came out of the prison camp there were several booths (for lack of a better word) providing supplies to the POWs. There was a Red Cross booth and a Salvation Army booth among others. They were giving out soap, razors, cigs, shoes, etc. Before the Red Cross would give out supplies they wanted the soldier's information so they could bill them for the supplies. The Salvation Army was giving out these supplies free of charge with no questions asked.

After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA

I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.

And yet... Your bs is only based on the barest hint of truth.
The Red Cross did charge for some things, yes, but at the behest of the military, and for commissary type items only in and around base or camp. Not after a disaster or in relief at a pow camp.

Citation: Link


I had only heard my story as it was passed down. I appreciate your link to Snopes as I had never heard/read that before. I'm not sure it applies 100% to my situation, but there certainly has to be some relevance.

My "bs" is true as it related to those involved. How were they to know who was ultimately responsible? All they knew was the Red Cross was going to bill them and the Salvation Army wasn't.
 
2012-11-01 07:57:51 PM
I can't believe Red Cross is still asking people for money.

They claimed to have a surplus of funds after 9-11. Why are they still asking for money?

WHERE DID THAT 400 MILLION DOLLARS GO?
 
2012-11-01 07:58:33 PM
I like soup.
 
2012-11-01 07:58:50 PM
As others have said, wasn't Monday night the night of the goddam storm? I mean, I don't know how the Red Cross works, I don't know how they set up shelters and whatnot, but don't they respond to disasters after they happen, not set up everywhere something possibly could happen, in case people need shiat? Even the Red Cross can't do that.

So biatching about the Red Cross not being available to pass stuff out on the very night shiat was going down seems like douchebaggery.
 
2012-11-01 08:03:59 PM

pciszek: OK, where can I donate money to help with disaster relief for areas hit by Sandy? Folks here have dissed the Red Cross. The Salvation Army, as I understand it, requires that people participate in religious services to receive aid. Is that true? Do they deny aid to gay people, as others here have claimed?


Check Charity Watch and Charity Navigator. There are hundreds of charities with descriptions of their charter, and detailed financial analysis. BTW - Red cross is highly rated by both. Getting charity advice on fark, is like asking farkers if Muslims are okay people.
 
2012-11-01 08:05:01 PM

Jack_Knopf: After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA


If you admit to not believing in their magical skyfairy, the salvation army will just ignore you and let you die in a ditch...
 
2012-11-01 08:05:34 PM
Ahh, The Island. New York City's own personal West Virginia.
 
2012-11-01 08:05:36 PM
For those biatching about the Red Cross during WWII (and other stories), this snopes article is quite informative.
 
2012-11-01 08:05:47 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: Sometimes, when bad publicity comes, agencies work extra hard as opposed to acting butt hurt.

If the Red Cross is the mature aid organization it wants to be, it will put the President's remarks into context. Can't be the first time that people are all bent out of shape after a disaster.


that's entirely too reasonable an assumption. this is fark, man.

i remember them defending their haiti shenanigans when it was found out they werent actually giving all the money thru their haiti hotline to haiti. so i expect less of them in general. and yeah, i dont give to them either.
 
2012-11-01 08:08:45 PM

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


I knew I wasn't going to be the first to mention that most of what you donate to groups like the Red Cross, Starvation Army, Humane Society, ASPCA, PETA, Greenpeace etc goes directly into the pockets of those who work there., Administrative costs they call it.
 
2012-11-01 08:12:11 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: I just don't understand why naive people are so hateful about the red cross.


To make excuses for or avoid feeling guilty about not donating.
 
2012-11-01 08:12:33 PM
Watching the borough president right now on CNN-talking to AC.
He said the Red Cross sent 10 buses today and fed them SOUP!!! hahaha
/He seemed ok with soup now
 
2012-11-01 08:20:56 PM

Badgers: Jack_Knopf: After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA

If you admit to not believing in their magical skyfairy, the salvation army will just ignore you and let you die in a ditch...


Not sure about that. But I do know they will kick your butt out the door faster than you can say Jeebus if you work for them and admit to being anything other than an upstanding heterosexual sky daddy believer.

There was actually a very sad story written by a woman who was fired for admitting to be bisexual, even though she was the most effective coordinator and administrator her work group had seen in years, to the point where she actually corrected the financial negligence of the person to precede her.
 
2012-11-01 08:26:39 PM

pxlboy: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

This is why I prefer to donate blood.


My house burned down in 1997 on Long Island. I was 17. The house and everything inside was a total loss, my parents had no insurance as they were renters and because of their own foolishness. The only thing we didn't lose were our lives. The Red Cross got my family, (Parents, brother, dog, cat & myself) into a hotel for a week beginning the night of the fire.

We had a lot of help from very, very generous friends, family, co-workers and school officials but the Red Cross did the following:

Provided vouchers for food (for humans and pets)

Provided 3 sets of clothing for each member of my family within 24 hours (new underwear, socks & donated articles of the rest), in the following weeks we received vouchers to buy additional clothing.

Provided access to a warehouse of furniture to completely refurnish the apartment we eventually rented.
(including brand new mattresses & box springs -- the rest of the furniture were hand me downs)

MOST IMPORTANTLY, Our case worker Alexandra provided my Mother and Father with HOPE. She provided them with support and the strengthened their will to go on after they lost everything. She told my mother, You just need to get through the next 5 minutes - tomorrow we'll worry about tomorrow. Eventually You'll be able to move on.

For that ASSHOLE to tell his constituents that based on this sole example no one should donate to the Red Cross -- fark HIM. This storm has been a tragedy. I have family members that have lost everything and I'm doing what I can for them. I'm following the example I learned from the Red Cross 15 years ago. I'm not saying there haven't been mistakes or that the Red Cross is exempt from scrutiny, but they try to help. They TRY to cut through the red tape. Their volunteers want to help.
 
2012-11-01 08:28:10 PM
glad more people are starting to stand up to these for-profit "Charities"

the Boards for both the Red Cross and United Way need to burn in hell
 
2012-11-01 08:28:57 PM

Head_Shot: Forgive my ignorance, but isn't Staten Island, like, A farkING ISLAND IN THE OCEAN?


So is "North America". Just bigger. What's yer point.
 
2012-11-01 08:32:52 PM

cgraves67: What's wrong with soup?


There's no soup for you. That's what's wrong.
 
2012-11-01 08:33:14 PM

kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.


Crap like this is why I say never give a dime to the Red Cross.

Remember 9/11? After that, there was a big telethon to raise money for the relief effort for New York, all proceeds to the Red Cross. People on TV kept saying don't give food and water and emergency supplies, give money.

So, people gave money. My mother gave several hundred dollars. She was this close to going out and buying hundreds of dollars worth of water and canned goods and such, but everyone kept saying to just give money to the Red Cross.

Then, afterwards, it came out that indeed, all the money went to the Red Cross, but the general fund, and only a small fraction of that money was spent in New York City on disaster relief. I remember to this day the announcement from the Red Cross talking about how you cannot donate to a specific relief effort or cause, only the general fund, and they don't want donations of goods, just money.

So, give them money, which they spend wherever and however they please, and only money. Or, you could try to use your money to actually help your fellow man.

Demanding money, and just money, is one reason I don't trust the Red Cross. They are more interested in the size of their bank account, and the six-figure salaries of their staff, than helping people in need. When the chips were down, they showed their true colors.

In the same vein, a few years ago, when I was basically part of the "working poor", I decided I wanted to better myself in some way and wanted to learn first aid and CPR, do something practical that might help me save a life or help my fellow man in some way. I got ahold of the local Red Cross office and asked how much it would be to get First Aid/CPR certification. It was $110. I'll be honest, I thought it would be a lot cheaper for a one-day lifesaving course given by an ostensibly non-profit charity. I didn't get the course, because for somebody making $7/hour and considering it a good week if he could get 30 hours of work, a $110 anything is just too far out of reach.

I'll find another charity to give to, one that actually helps people.
 
2012-11-01 08:35:17 PM

kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.


When I evacuated with my extended family to Knoxville, running from Katrina, Red Cross had a station set up in three days. They handed us a food basket, medical supplies, pamplets about navigating through various gov programs, and about $350 for each adult. They acted as a stop-gap measure to help pay for our hotel room, food, and medicines. FEMA, and Louisiana Road Home Fund, is what helped the most. Those two government run programs allowed my parents to move back home, and it allowed for me to recoup the lost wages. (My apartment was on the second floor,so my stuff stayed dry.)

The way I see it, the Red Cross is a first line of help, they keep you going while the slower, more deliberate aid is distributed to those who qualify.

So, the lady receiving $350 in assistance isn't exactly telling the whole story. I wager, even if she doesn't have fire insurance, she will be helped substantially by other social safety nets, as long as we haven't gutted them.
 
2012-11-01 08:41:00 PM
I call for the Red cross to pull out of Staten Island. They arent wanted there.
 
2012-11-01 08:41:01 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).


You're upset because you ended up helping someone who you didn't expect to help, but needed it anyway?
 
2012-11-01 08:44:16 PM

Badgers: Jack_Knopf: After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA

If you admit to not believing in their magical skyfairy, the salvation army will just ignore you and let you die in a ditch...



Incorrect, they won't let you work for them if you are not a member of their faith, but they do help anybody, I closed my shop to get back in a rig and help deliver supplies for Sandy, my first load was portable pumps from a Navy warehouse in Jax to the outskirts of the Bronx, today I picked up a load of clothes/drygoods from a Salvation Army warehouse in South Carolina to deliver up north, neither the trailer nor any of the boxes are labeled as being from the SA, the people at the warehouse were not preachy and even offered me lunch after seeing and finding out what the the big Magen David I wear means.

/how bout some of you stop spouting off and start helping out, I know most can't close their businesses for a week and hop into a semi but you can do smaller things,
//Oh and how about you members of the fark athiest brigade stop biatching about how people help and maybe start your own charity, if ya all can raise 15K to buy Joe a bird.....
 
2012-11-01 08:44:38 PM
Where is Wolf Blitzer, "so rich, so white"?
 
2012-11-01 08:46:38 PM

thepostess: Lost_in_Oregon: Sandy was caused by a secret weather control weapon the ultra-rightwingers have.

The right-wingers control the "gay" weapon?


I thought Obama was the one with the weather control satellite?
 
2012-11-01 08:47:42 PM

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


Would you anti-Red-Cross types explain yourselves please? Wtf is with the total distrust of every single established institution of American life? Fair enough if you've got cause - just please, for my betterment, explain to me what it is??
 
2012-11-01 08:51:12 PM
While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.
 
2012-11-01 08:53:00 PM
Eating soup is how you know it's bad, huh? Instead of, say, gnawing on a drowned rat because you haven't eaten for days.
 
2012-11-01 08:53:40 PM

that was my nickname in highschool: Zarquon's Flat Tire: Aren't they the ones who charged soldiers for donated bandages in WWII?

[citation needed]


My grandfather was a WWII vet. He was combat infantry in Europe.

After being in the field for a few months, they got to a town that had a Red Cross booth with coffee and donuts.

But the Red Cross would only give those to the officers. Nothing for the enlisted.

Grandpa used to talk about the Red Cross using the same terms he used for the Nazis.

I wont give the Red Cross anything. They're a bloated bureaucracy that spends most of their money sending staff to conferences at 5 star hotels with fancy meals and drinks. Fark them.

The Salvation Army is a lot better. I don't like the religious aspect, however, donations truly go to those who need them.
 
2012-11-01 08:55:27 PM

Badgers: Jack_Knopf: After hearing this story I refuse to give to the Red Cross and send all my donations to the Salvation Army. I'm know the Red Cross does some very good deeds, but this stuck with me.

/csb
//didn't RTFA

If you admit to not believing in their magical skyfairy, the salvation army will just ignore you and let you die in a ditch...


Yeah, citation needed on that one, too. Nice try, though, jackass.
 
2012-11-01 08:58:15 PM

kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.




According to Forbes, they have 92% efficiency.
 
2012-11-01 08:58:31 PM

Benjimin_Dover: While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.


Yeah, but it makes sense. Look, if it's a local thing, i.e. a community center collecting food, clothing, whatever for recipients in that community, it's easy enough to organize. But can you imagine the organizational challenges associated with redistributing blankets and canned goods in an emergency? How much staff time would be devoted just to moving these things around - or hell, counting them?? It doesn't make sense at scale. Sure, we all grew up on canned food drives, and it makes us feel all fuzzy and whatnot, but that isn't a reason for accusing a disaster relief organization of unethical behavior.

I'm farking sick of it - half of American society seems hellbent on deconstructing the institutional structure of civilization, for what reason I have no idea. Probably because the mission statement doesn't mention Jesus, or something.
 
2012-11-01 08:59:37 PM

EnviroDude: Working at the Red Cross pays well

http://www.charitynavigator.org/index.cfm?bay=search.summary&orgid=3 27 7


Go derrp somewhere else
 
2012-11-01 08:59:54 PM

CujoQuarrel: for disaster relief I give to the Salvation Army


This.

I don't believe in Jebus any more than I believe in FSM, but I can tell you that when Katrina hit, the Jebus freaks with the Salvation Army had people already staged inside the state with stockpiles of food and supplies, ready to go immediately after the storm.
 
2012-11-01 09:01:57 PM

Benjimin_Dover: While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.


More like handing a homeless guy an electric lamp, but whatever.
 
2012-11-01 09:03:40 PM
Where is the red cross? Enjoying the cash it raked in on 9/11 and never paid out to the victims families. I seem to remember them saying something like "we are going to keep most of it, for a future disaster", instead of giving it to the families like it was intended when given.

/tho i may be wrong.
 
2012-11-01 09:04:25 PM
Why just pick on them? Where is Knights of Columbus? The Red Hot Chili Peppers? The hot teacher form 3rd grade.

That guy sounds a little too bootstrappy to me
 
2012-11-01 09:06:44 PM

Benjimin_Dover: While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.




They have millions of people in need. They need to load up trucks and get them moving. I expect they have centralized warehouses at which they load up pre-packaged supplies with forklifts by the pallet-load. Doing this would make it quick and efficient. The cooks at destination sites know what is coming, and probably have streamlined processes to make it and get it served.

Or, you know, they could stop at every neighborhood can drive to pick up whatever random donations people drop off, sort them for expiration, category, etc. Then they could sort that mismatched pile into some kind of shippable configuration, and then take it somewhere.

Meanwhile, the cooks they've got at the destination sites have no idea what is arriving, what quantity, quality, variety, etc. Because they don't know what is being donated, they don't know what will be required to cook it, prepare it, or serve it.

Do you want an efficient, streamlined, rapid response, or do you want to feel good about donating your own little 2 cans of cream of mushroom soup?
 
2012-11-01 09:08:15 PM

braedan: pxlboy: kmg8181: A good friend of my family lost her house due to massive wildfires in my area about 2 years ago. The local red cross office received over half a million dollars locally in fundraisers for those families affected. She ended up getting about $350 in relief from them, and she received more than most, seeing as how she had lost everything. When the red cross gets donations, those donations go to pay their administration first and go to relief a very distant second.

This is why I prefer to donate blood.

My house burned down in 1997 on Long Island. I was 17. The house and everything inside was a total loss, my parents had no insurance as they were renters and because of their own foolishness. The only thing we didn't lose were our lives. The Red Cross got my family, (Parents, brother, dog, cat & myself) into a hotel for a week beginning the night of the fire.

We had a lot of help from very, very generous friends, family, co-workers and school officials but the Red Cross did the following:

Provided vouchers for food (for humans and pets)

Provided 3 sets of clothing for each member of my family within 24 hours (new underwear, socks & donated articles of the rest), in the following weeks we received vouchers to buy additional clothing.

Provided access to a warehouse of furniture to completely refurnish the apartment we eventually rented.
(including brand new mattresses & box springs -- the rest of the furniture were hand me downs)

MOST IMPORTANTLY, Our case worker Alexandra provided my Mother and Father with HOPE. She provided them with support and the strengthened their will to go on after they lost everything. She told my mother, You just need to get through the next 5 minutes - tomorrow we'll worry about tomorrow. Eventually You'll be able to move on.

For that ASSHOLE to tell his constituents that based on this sole example no one should donate to the Red Cross -- fark HIM. This storm has been a tragedy. I have family members that have lost everyt ...


This story should be read by every one of the haters. Thanks for sharing, bro, seriously.
 
2012-11-01 09:24:16 PM
Actually it sounded to me like the President of Staten Island was: in a state of shock, pumped up on adrenalin, and hysterically running off at the mouth.

What in the hell could have gotten him so worked up?

Oh . . .yeah.

He'd JUST gotten back from walking about in his destroyed community.

(always a shocker - seeing devastation - where only yesterday - was normalcy)

He'd seen dogs searching for the dead.

People wandering about shoeless and suffering.

People trying to make soup in some sort of bootstrappy fashion.

Realized there were folks - lots of them - trapped in the water under their crushed homes.

And while he might be the "President of Staten Island" - he's also just another human being - and one whose job primarily has him spending his time being a desk jockey.

He's gone from saying, "Okay Jim. Let's meet for lunch on Tuesday and finalize this" while leaning back in his desk chair, with everything in his world comfortably under control - to asking in a stunned voice "Uh. Isn't that trapped people screaming for help? Why is no one getting them out?" and the sudden realization that a whole lot of hurting folks are now looking at him for these "up close and personal" answers.

Answers he does NOT have.

The man is overwhelmed. And he's FREAKING OUT.

He has every right to be.

The ocean just ate his world.

Seems to me we could all cut him some slack.

The folks in his community need help. For the trapped folks it is a matter of life and death. He gets THAT.

That "his people" NEED HELP NOW!

He'd thought disaster relief showed up relatively FAST - like an ambulance. It didn't.

The needed help for Staten Island STILL hadn't shown up . . .

Yet NOW he was hearing - about great efforts already in place - to keep a marathon - from being cancelled?
(gotta be honest - that would've been crazy-making for me too)

What I took from the article was: The folks in Staten Island - desperately need help NOW - rather than later.
 
2012-11-01 09:26:12 PM

bikerific: Benjimin_Dover: While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.



They have millions of people in need. They need to load up trucks and get them moving. I expect they have centralized warehouses at which they load up pre-packaged supplies with forklifts by the pallet-load. Doing this would make it quick and efficient. The cooks at destination sites know what is coming, and probably have streamlined processes to make it and get it served.

Or, you know, they could stop at every neighborhood can drive to pick up whatever random donations people drop off, sort them for expiration, category, etc. Then they could sort that mismatched pile into some kind of shippable configuration, and then take it somewhere.

Meanwhile, the cooks they've got at the destination sites have no idea what is arriving, what quantity, quality, variety, etc. Because they don't know what is being donated, they don't know what will be required to cook it, prepare it, or serve it.

Do you want an efficient, streamlined, rapid response, or do you want to feel good about donating your own little 2 cans of cream of mushroom soup?


The stuff being donated by the people in Ohio doesn't necessarily HAVE to be what goes to this area. That stuff could go into the Red Cross inventory and stuff that is already in there can go. Also, money that would have been spent on materials elsewhere for food and clothing now can be diverted to this area.

Stuff goes into one side of the Red Cross, other stuff comes out the other side.

Logistics: How does it work?

The same thing happens with blood donations. Your son is in the hospital and needs blood. You donating blood to help him doesn't mean YOUR blood goes in his arm.
 
2012-11-01 09:28:01 PM

xynix: I don't think they understand how the Red Cross works. They Red Cross are not first responders. During Katrina it took them two weeks before they got to New Orleans. What they DID do though was hang out on the edge like in Baton Rouge, Lafayette, as far away as Houston and built places where people could lay their heads for a week or so while things got to a somewhat normal state.

Volunteers should not be in a disaster area until things are stabilized. To think of Joe Jones, average RC volunteer, trouncing through flood waters with broken gas lines is ludicrous. These people are just looking for someone to blame for their OWN failings in preparation for what people said was going to happen sooner or later. Are you ready now fark face?


So you're saying that in the inevitable zombie outbreak, Red Cross WON'T be on the frontline handing out ammo?

Well, damnit, who will? Because they're getting my dollar. I want my dollar to put a bullet through some zombie's skull, anything less is misappropriation in my book.
 
2012-11-01 09:28:03 PM

Benjimin_Dover: bikerific: Benjimin_Dover: While I don't have any particular reason to hate Red Cross, I found its response to the people of Ohio who wanted to donate food and clothing to them after this disaster to be somewhat rude.

It reminded me of a somebody who comes up to you on the street and says that he is hungry and asks for some money. Then when you offer to take him into the diner right there, he says that he doesn't want food and that he wants money. Basically, at that point, you know the money is going to drugs or booze and not food.

Yeah. Pretty much smells the same.



They have millions of people in need. They need to load up trucks and get them moving. I expect they have centralized warehouses at which they load up pre-packaged supplies with forklifts by the pallet-load. Doing this would make it quick and efficient. The cooks at destination sites know what is coming, and probably have streamlined processes to make it and get it served.

Or, you know, they could stop at every neighborhood can drive to pick up whatever random donations people drop off, sort them for expiration, category, etc. Then they could sort that mismatched pile into some kind of shippable configuration, and then take it somewhere.

Meanwhile, the cooks they've got at the destination sites have no idea what is arriving, what quantity, quality, variety, etc. Because they don't know what is being donated, they don't know what will be required to cook it, prepare it, or serve it.

Do you want an efficient, streamlined, rapid response, or do you want to feel good about donating your own little 2 cans of cream of mushroom soup?

The stuff being donated by the people in Ohio doesn't necessarily HAVE to be what goes to this area. That stuff could go into the Red Cross inventory and stuff that is already in there can go. Also, money that would have been spent on materials elsewhere for food and clothing now can be diverted to this area.

Stuff goes into one side of the Red Cross, other s ...


Also, many people are hurting all over the place and may not have money to give but have clothes, blankets, and other things that they can part with. Telling them to go get bent is just dumb.
 
2012-11-01 09:35:03 PM
Did they really tell them to get bent? As far as I can tell, they told them they accept monetary rather than durable goods donations. Those two things are not the same thing.
 
2012-11-01 09:36:18 PM
I have grown up with uncles and their friends that served in WWII and Korea.
None of them ever had a nice thing to say about the red cross.
If a disaster happens locally, and a local charity is started to help, I will donate to it.
 
2012-11-01 09:36:23 PM

braedan: My house burned down in 1997 on Long Island. I was 17. The house and everything inside was a total loss, my parents had no insurance as they were renters and because of their own foolishness. The only thing we didn't lose were our lives. The Red Cross got my family, (Parents, brother, dog, cat & myself) into a hotel for a week beginning the night of the fire.

We had a lot of help from very, very generous friends, family, co-workers and school officials but the Red Cross did the following:

Provided vouchers for food (for humans and pets)

Provided 3 sets of clothing for each member of my family within 24 hours (new underwear, socks & donated articles of the rest), in the following weeks we received vouchers to buy additional clothing.

Provided access to a warehouse of furniture to completely refurnish the apartment we eventually rented.
(including brand new mattresses & box springs -- the rest of the furniture were hand me downs)

MOST IMPORTANTLY, Our case worker Alexandra provided my Mother and Father with HOPE. She provided them with support and the strengthened their will to go on after they lost everything. She told my mother, You just need to get through the next 5 minutes - tomorrow we'll worry about tomorrow. Eventually You'll be able to move on.


See, the Red Cross is evil, Borough President James Molinaro. You are NOT a douchebag.
 
2012-11-01 09:39:00 PM

thisisarepeat: Its kinda hard to feel sorry for them since they decided to live in hurricane territory.


Joplin? It's kinda hard to feel sorry for them since they live in Tornado Alley,
 
2012-11-01 09:44:01 PM

Jeteupthemiddle: Like another poster up thread, my grandfather always, always held a grudge against the Red Cross...I think for charging for coffee while in Korea? Maybe?

Anyway, because of his grudge, the money in our family never went to the Red Cross, but to the Salvation Army.

According to this old, out-dated snopes article, the CEO of the Salvation Army makes $13,000 a year plus housing. Which means about $0.93 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes, as opposed to with the Red Cross where approximately $0.13 of your donated dollar goes to the charity's causes.


Sadly, the Salvation Army has its own problems.
 
2012-11-01 09:47:36 PM

WorthNoting: Actually it sounded to me like the President of Staten Island was: in a state of shock, pumped up on adrenalin, and hysterically running off at the mouth.

What in the hell could have gotten him so worked up?

Oh . . .yeah.

He'd JUST gotten back from walking about in his destroyed community.

(always a shocker - seeing devastation - where only yesterday - was normalcy)

He'd seen dogs searching for the dead.

People wandering about shoeless and suffering.

People trying to make soup in some sort of bootstrappy fashion.

Realized there were folks - lots of them - trapped in the water under their crushed homes.

And while he might be the "President of Staten Island" - he's also just another human being - and one whose job primarily has him spending his time being a desk jockey.

He's gone from saying, "Okay Jim. Let's meet for lunch on Tuesday and finalize this" while leaning back in his desk chair, with everything in his world comfortably under control - to asking in a stunned voice "Uh. Isn't that trapped people screaming for help? Why is no one getting them out?" and the sudden realization that a whole lot of hurting folks are now looking at him for these "up close and personal" answers.

Answers he does NOT have.

The man is overwhelmed. And he's FREAKING OUT.

He has every right to be.

The ocean just ate his world.

Seems to me we could all cut him some slack.

The folks in his community need help. For the trapped folks it is a matter of life and death. He gets THAT.

That "his people" NEED HELP NOW!

He'd thought disaster relief showed up relatively FAST - like an ambulance. It didn't.

The needed help for Staten Island STILL hadn't shown up . . .

Yet NOW he was hearing - about great efforts already in place - to keep a marathon - from being cancelled?
(gotta be honest - that would've been crazy-making for me too)

What I took from the article was: The folks in Staten Island - desperately need help NOW - rather than later.


He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.
 
2012-11-01 09:49:50 PM
If you live near a hospital with a blood bank (most people do, as even medium sized hospitals have them), donate your blood directly to the blood bank. Your donation gets to the people who need it faster, meaning it has a longer shelf life, and the hospitals don't get charged the ridiculous markup that the Red Cross charges for selling them the blood that they collect.

The Red Cross in the US is a farking scam. They are so bloated with their overhead that they can't even sell hospitals a product they get for free and cover their costs. One pint of blood collected by the Red Cross is sold to hospitals for ~$150. For a product donated to them. For free. They run 200,000 blood drives every year, collecting millions of pints of blood. And they still can't break even. There's something fundamentally wrong with that organization.
 
2012-11-01 09:57:46 PM

Why didn't Stanton Island residents leave? What's wrong with soup?

Fark if I know but here's something to make you think..well almost.

s15.postimage.org
 
2012-11-01 10:07:34 PM

Lost_in_Oregon: freewill:

The first time something like this ever happens to your community, it feels that way. It just does. No matter how many times you've seen it on the news, it feels a little bit like the apocalypse has come and nobody cares.


This!

Had a small disaster - micro burst destroyed all 30 full-grown trees on my property - and I wanted to throw rocks at every asshole who drove by to see the storm damage.


When hurricanes Charlie and Frances came through central Florida back in '04, we
ended up having to evacuate in the middle of the farking hurricane. Charlie came
through first and we weathered that just fine in our apartment. What we didn't know
is that top layer structural damage had been done to the roof of the building and the
complex didn't have time to fix it - and didn't even put up one of those blue tarps to
keep out rain until it could be fixed.

So along comes Frances and we figure we can wait that one out too. I mean, we only
lost power for maybe an hour with Charlie. Five or so hours into Frances and water
starts coming through the AC vents. Then it starts coming through the light fixtures.

Not just drips. It was POURING. I was in the bathroom w/ my husband empyting out
one of the plastic drawers we were using to catch water and we hear a cracking
sound, then a pair of screams and then a crash from our living room.

We ran out and our entire living room ceiling was on the floor. My son had been playing
in the middle of the room and at the first crack, my mother literally dove across the room,
grabbed him and kept rolling until they fetched up against the wall in the corner of the
room.

We lost over 90% of our belongings that day but at least nobody was hurt.

What hurt was driving by the apartment a week later and seeing stuff from our apartment
out by the dumpsters and seeing people picking through it. This woman was looking over
my son's crib and I wanted to jump out and pull her away and scream IT'S MINE but I just
cried as we drove past.

Farking vultures. It's not a damn garage sale. People's lives just got blown apart and you're
out there like it's a farking swap meet!
 
2012-11-01 10:18:56 PM

Benjimin_Dover: The stuff being donated by the people in Ohio doesn't necessarily HAVE to be what goes to this area. That stuff could go into the Red Cross inventory and stuff that is already in there can go. Also, money that would have been spent on materials elsewhere for food and clothing now can be diverted to this area.

Stuff goes into one side of the Red Cross, other stuff comes out the other side.

Logistics: How does it work?

The same thing happens with blood donations. Your son is in the hospital and needs blood. You donating blood to help him doesn't mean YOUR blood goes in his arm.




So now, not only does the Red Cross have to mobilize a full forward action to the affected areas, they have to divert attention rearward to collect, sort, and deal with random crap.

Once more:

Efficient:

1. Use buying power and charity status to buy stuff cheap.
2. Receive exactly the supplies you want, by the truckload and/or pallet.
3. Load up pallets with forklift, or just
4. Send trucks directly to affected areas.



Not efficient:

Collect random donations.
Sort to remove expired or otherwise unacceptable goods.
Sort by item type (probably).
Inventory so you know what you have.
Figure out how to use what you have (can't just send 100 cans of random stuff somewhere).
Find some way to bundle, which probably means sorting by size or putting into some kind of universal container.
Now you are kind of at what was step 2 above, except you don't get to pick your inventory and you don't have a nice flow.


Seriously, we figured out interchangeable parts and assembly lines some time ago. It applies here, too.


Lots of other community based entities can put your canned goods to good use. The Red Cross doesn't work that way, and shouldn't work that way. 


/And as far as blood donations go, they make you go through extensive screening on that too, and may reject it. Then it is packaged into identical interchangeable containers and run through a sophisticated inventory management system. Try giving them blood you collected in mason jars and see how that goes.
 
2012-11-01 10:31:30 PM

Amusement: Why didn't Stanton Island residents leave?


Staten Island residents: "We didn't want to evacuate on several days notice because that's inconvenient. But dammit other people should travel across the nation to help me! And they aren't doing it the very next day!"


/fairly typical attitude for the north east
 
2012-11-01 10:40:25 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Don't give money to Aquaman either.


Everyone talks shiat about Aquaman, but he really is the superhero you would probably want on your side in this disaster.
 
2012-11-01 10:44:48 PM
yay let the backlash against nyers commence!

/guy is an asshole
 
2012-11-01 10:48:19 PM
I'm guessing this guy is Republican.

Anyone wanna tell me if I'm right?
 
2012-11-01 10:50:40 PM

lordmoon: LowbrowDeluxe: lordmoon: namatad: kmg8181:

Covering operational expenses is fine. Just not when part of those expenses are six-figure salaries for those at the top.

I dislike corporate culture more than the next guy, but is there some reason you think the people running and organizing an international charity that deals with millions of dollars daily should earn less than a plumber? If we're talking 700k+ salaries, okay, yeah. But 6 figures? Anywhere from 100-250k seems just as reasonable to me for that type of work as it does for private practice doctor's and plumbing contractors.

Red Cross CEO is making about $500k.


People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.
 
2012-11-01 10:51:58 PM
Things I learned in this thread; donate blood to local hospitals, Red Cross is more of profit maker than a humanitarian organization. Dumb people continue to breed at a near epic rate. Like rats in a former NYC sewer.

Almost feel sorry for Stanton Islanders..almost.
 
2012-11-01 11:06:16 PM
I hate the Red Cross, but for a totally different reason. Sure, sure, their work during natural disasters is all well and fine, but woe be unto you if you ever volunteer to donate blood. I made the mistake of doing that once, about ten years ago. They asked me to fill out a bunch of forms about my medical history, etc., no problem. My mistake was giving them my real phone number. Not more than a week after that I started getting constant harassing phone calls during dinner time asking me to donate more blood. They only removed my number from their lists after I started screaming at them after the 20th interrupted dinner. Fark them, I hope they rot.
 
2012-11-01 11:07:52 PM

Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative. *snip*


Same thing happened to me with the San Fran earthquake. My Army company was there digging out bodies and clearing rubble. We raised over $20,000 to ease the suffering we saw. They diverted the funds away - there was no option for accounting then - and I haven't given them a dime since. Nor will I again.

Local food banks, cancer fundraising, local animal shelter, etc. get my money now.
 
2012-11-01 11:08:52 PM
"City Hall is more worried about getting everything running again for Manhattan and making everything look like it's back to normal. We're not back to normal and we're not going to be back to normal for a long time."

Well, of course. The only reason Manhattanites know of the other 4 boroughs at all is because thats where all their servants live. As long as all the starbucks in the east village get back up and running, that is all that matters.
 
2012-11-01 11:10:39 PM

JerkStore: I'm honestly really sorry about the damage, and while I can't imagine what it's like to lose one's house, it must be awful. If that's you, I'm sorry.

However, these folks in New York and New Jersey sure seem whiny as hell about it. On the radio, on the TV, and every time a reporter shows up, all they do is whine about how awful it is and how nobody's helping them and what are they going to do? I don't recall all those poor folks in New Orleans being such crybabies after Katrina. Seriously, i thought New Yorkers were tough? Enough with the whining and expecting miracles from volunteers. Nobody owes you anything, by the way.


Um...I don't think u were watching the same post-Katrina coverage I was.
 
2012-11-01 11:14:29 PM

Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.


A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"
 
2012-11-01 11:14:52 PM
My grandpa used to yell at clouds, something about the Red Cross charging his unit for flag poles at Iwo Jima.

Also, I have no idea how massive nonprofits work, but I know this: Their senior leadership should not be making more than minimum wage. After all, nonPROFIT means nobody involved gets paid.

Now where can I mail these Spaghetti O's? I'm making a difference.
 
2012-11-01 11:24:49 PM
what scares me about donating to the red cross is that ussually the donations are administered by the united way. we all know how crooked they are. and i dont feel at all that new yorkers are being particularly whiny about thier situation. it doesnt appear that they are looking for a handout. kinda looks to me like they are all willing to pay for thier relief. katrina people wanted everything handed to them. im looking at catastrophes in two major cities and it kind of brings me back to the flooding in nashville and how they handled it. they just buckled down and took care of it themselves(after the government and relief agencys said we cant help you)
 
2012-11-01 11:25:14 PM

Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"

 
2012-11-01 11:31:38 PM

crabsno termites: Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"



this person said it all.

I can run any company in the cpuntry with 2/3 the people fpr 3/4 the cost (very conservative estimates). How? Hire good people, let them work. And yes, I,m ver good at what I do, and have done many things.

/concieted/arrogant? probably.

//Confident? YOUfarkINBETCHA.

///Successful? (see above)

////Retired and happy.

////4 (No, FIVE! slashies.
 
2012-11-01 11:32:59 PM
Go to it, grammar nazis.

/Typing skills substandard.
 
2012-11-01 11:34:33 PM

TDBoedy: He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.


Really ? ? ? : - O

In that case - the bootstrappy attempts at soup making - were probably EXTREMELY terrifying.

Joking aside though . . .

From reading about the condition Superstorm Sandy left Staten Island in - for the folks there to be begging for help - well, it's justified.

It's not like - people who don't want to help them - have to.

But for those who DO want to help:

Staten Island is seriously farked up and - they STILL have parts they can't even get to - complete with folks trapped there.

So they actually DO need help. That's just the reality of their circumstances right now.

Anyhow . . . focusing critically on ANY of the Staten Island folks - supposed lack of ability to express themselves "as storm victims" with verbal finesse - at this particular point in time - strikes me as being a bit unfair - is all I'm saying.

Folks there are IN SHOCK.

The ocean just ate their world. 

/feels so sad for them
 
2012-11-01 11:35:45 PM

Macular Degenerate: If you live near a hospital with a blood bank (most people do, as even medium sized hospitals have them), donate your blood directly to the blood bank. Your donation gets to the people who need it faster, meaning it has a longer shelf life, and the hospitals don't get charged the ridiculous markup that the Red Cross charges for selling them the blood that they collect.

The Red Cross in the US is a farking scam. They are so bloated with their overhead that they can't even sell hospitals a product they get for free and cover their costs. One pint of blood collected by the Red Cross is sold to hospitals for ~$150. For a product donated to them. For free. They run 200,000 blood drives every year, collecting millions of pints of blood. And they still can't break even. There's something fundamentally wrong with that organization.


Do you have any sense of the logistics behind the blood drive operations? The testing that has to be done on each and every unit? The nonexistent margin for error?

There are many misguided axes being ground in this thread.
 
2012-11-01 11:39:02 PM
I worked with the Red Cross for Katrina in an old Wal-Mart building. I've heard people say the SBC, or the Salvation Army did something but Red Cross didn't. What they didn't know is we were all working out of the same building. The people that you saw in certain areas were the closest. My particular job was to see what shelter needed what items. I had to see if they were in stock in warehouses full of donations, if so, I'd call in the trucks for getting it to the shelters, if not I had to order it. I remember FEMA got all the ice in the entire state it seemed, but it was sent to hospitals, so that was good. We had to be careful where we sent the perishables.

I worked next to a Southern Baptist Convention guy who I remember being on the phone yelling at some shelter guy that wanted to reject water in white cans with anheiser busch logo on it. Learned a bit about the phrase "bless his heart" from him.

The problem though was Katrina about broke the Red Cross. They sent out their trained people first, and ran out. I was in the wave of folks that had only 2 hrs or so of training. I was trained to record names and dole out money, but ended up in logistics because they needed someone with computer skills.

The lack of interviewing for the last few volunteer waves caused some asshats to get in. They took their stipend and partied with it or went home. People would just disappear. I've wondered if the Red Cross would go after them for their cash or bill them the plane ticket. Never did ask.

/cool story
 
2012-11-01 11:46:03 PM

WorthNoting: TDBoedy: He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.

Really ? ? ? : - O

In that case - the bootstrappy attempts at soup making - were probably EXTREMELY terrifying.

Joking aside though . . .

From reading about the condition Superstorm Sandy left Staten Island in - for the folks there to be begging for help - well, it's justified.

It's not like - people who don't want to help them - have to.

But for those who DO want to help:

Staten Island is seriously farked up and - they STILL have parts they can't even get to - complete with folks trapped there.

So they actually DO need help. That's just the reality of their circumstances right now.

Anyhow . . . focusing critically on ANY of the Staten Island folks - supposed lack of ability to express themselves "as storm victims" with verbal finesse - at this particular point in time - strikes me as being a bit unfair - is all I'm saying.

Folks there are IN SHOCK.

The ocean just ate their world. 

/feels so sad for them


Yeah, I'm not exactly going to fault the guy for wanting the money to go to people he's seeing helping him out right now.
 
2012-11-02 12:00:34 AM

dofus: I can back this story up with personal experiences in Texas during the Viet Nam War. For all you anti-religious Farkers out there who want to make Farky comments about the Salvation Army, y'all can FOAD.


SA supports anti-gay legislation. That's where your money is going.
 
2012-11-02 12:05:07 AM
Another rightwing asshat
 
2012-11-02 12:09:18 AM
The article and the comments below remind me why I hate most people.

After Katrina there were more volunteers from NY in Norleans than any of those hate spitting blame throwing assswholez will ever remember. To them it's "libtardland"...
unless you're talking about 9/11
 
2012-11-02 12:58:33 AM

LoneWolf343: Atypical Person Reading Fark: We stopped with the Red Cross after Katrina. We mailed in a donation which, for us, was sizable and there was a box we could check that said "get an accounting of how your money was spent." There was also a box indicating why and where we wanted to donate, so we callously said Katrina (and not Chiapas or Nigeria, as we give in other ways to other parts of the world). We wanted to help out New Orleans.

We got our statement from the Red Cross six months later. Due to overwhelming donations, they didn't use our money in New Orleans, it went to Spain and somewhere else. Was pissed. In the meantime, people here in SoCal were still paying out of pocket for plane tickets for homeless people to come to L.A., and we were helping round up jobs for said displaced people. Huh? Why wouldn't the Red cross find a way to use my dollars to help New Orleans? Gotta be more creative.

Since then, I watch what they do locally (yes, they run a blood bank - but the number of ginormous blood bank trucks they've purchased just in my county is outrageous and they only use them two days a week, each). They spend virtually no money advertising when and where said trucks are going to be and then wonder about donations dropping off.

Bah. Humbug. Some of you young Farkers, get out there and start a new charity. Thanks a bunch.

(My dad says they were great in WW2 and brought cigarettes and chocolates to his armored division).

You're upset because you ended up helping someone who you didn't expect to help, but needed it anyway?


Actually, yes. I give to various causes around the world to help with specific things. I do not give to the Red Cross - whose leaders I do not always trust nor agree with in terms of methods - to spend as they wish.

For example, I've been active in World Food Day and its organizations (through the U.N.) for 30 years. I also give to a French National Educational Fund that has really made a difference in Cameroon - a good friend of mine matches my contributions by giving to a women's economic development banking system in Egypt; she's visited both Cameroon and Egypt to check out how the money is spent.

And that's what I want - specific causes and accountability. When the Red Cross did send their semi-annual statement, I wasn't happy with the amount that went to salaries or where the salary money was spent. I wanted jobs in certain areas (we gave to the Red Cross for 9/11 as well, and not a single PENNY of the money we gave went to New York).

In fact, some of it ended up going to places (like Mexico) where I am already actively involved in doing other charitable things. The appeal was made for New York after 9/11, that's why I gave.

I give to particular causes in Southern Mexico (and in Oaxaca) because I know the people who run them (and even though they are both religious organizations, they are non-discriminatory and further, they mentor American college students in non-profit work abroad, all of which I'm on board for).

I don't have a lot of money to be flinging at Red Cross's issues (or its salary infrastructure, which is enormous).
 
2012-11-02 01:27:16 AM
CASEY KASEM'S AMERICAN TOP 40 - 2/16/74

#40 "LAST KISS" - Wednesday
#39 "SUNSHINE ON MY SHOULDERS" - John Denver
#38 "I LIKE TO LIVE THE LOVE" - B.B. King
#37 "TRYING TO HOLD ON TO MY WOMAN" - Lamont Dozier
#36 "MY SWEET LADY" - Cliff De Young
#35 "COME AND GET YOUR LOVE" - Redbone
#34 "ERES TU" - Mocedades

#33 "THE AMERICANS" - Gordon Sinclair
#32 "ABRA-CA-DABRA" - The DeFranco Family
#31 "CAN THIS BE REAL" - Natural Four
#30 "MOCKINGBIRD" - Carly Simon & James Taylor
#29 "THE MOST BEAUTIFUL GIRL" - Charlie Rich
#28 "NEVER, NEVER GONNA GIVE YA UP" - Barry White
#27 "BABY COME CLOSE" - Smokey Robinson
#26 "TIME IN A BOTTLE" - Jim Croce
#25 "JIM DANDY" - Black Oak Arkansas
#24 "SEXY MAMA" - The Moments
#23 "LIVING FOR THE CITY" - Stevie Wonder
#22 "SMOKIN' IN THE BOYS' ROOM" - Brownsville Station
#21 "DARK LADY" - Cher
#20 "MIDNIGHT RIDER" - Gregg Allman
#19 "A LOVE SONG" - Anne Murray
#18 "THE JOKER" - The Steve Miller Band
#17 "LAST TIME I SAW HIM" - Diana Ross
#16 "DOO DOO DOO DOO DOO (HEARTBREAKER)" - The Rolling Stones
#15 "I LOVE" - Tom T. Hall
#14 "I'VE GOT TO USE MY IMAGINATION" - Gladys Knight & the Pips
#13 "PUT YOUR HANDS TOGETHER" - The O' Jays
#12 "SEASONS IN THE SUN" - Terry Jacks
#11 "SHOW AND TELL" - Al Wilson
#10 "ROCK ON" - David Essex
#9 "BOOGIE DOWN" - Eddie Kendricks
#8 "JUNGLE BOOGIE" - Kool & The Gang
#7 "LET ME BE THERE" - Olivia Newton-John

#6 "AMERICANS" - Byron MacGregor
Note: Casey skips over #6 because Gordon Sinclair's version was played at #33
#5 "SPIDERS AND SNAKES" - Jim Stafford
#4 "UNTIL YOU COME BACK TO ME (THAT'S WHAT I'M GONNA DO)" - Aretha Franklin
#3 "YOU'RE SIXTEEN" - Ringo Starr
#2 "LOVE'S THEME" - Love Unlimited Orchestra
#1 "THE WAY WE WERE" - Barbra Streisand
 
2012-11-02 01:31:38 AM

madgonad: There is a problem here and a lot of people are clueless.

The Red Cross is a first responder.

Their mission is to provide services as soon as possible. For disasters that had some early notice their people and resources are moved into secure areas in advance so that they can provide aid and support immediately. While they do provide ongoing support, they have always been first responders. They even have joint authority with FEMA.


They do not, however, provide tunnel-draining services. Why this imbecile is complaining because the Red Cross is not out there getting the water out of the tunnels is beyond my comprehension.
 
2012-11-02 01:38:08 AM
The Red Cross used to run the blood supply up here until they gave all those peopl aids.
 
2012-11-02 01:47:28 AM
Doctors Without Borders and Heifer Project International are still okay, though, right?
 
2012-11-02 02:23:04 AM

randomjsa: Don't worry. Red Cross has been on my "never give a dime to" list for over a decade now.


Me too... my work place raised about ten grand for them after 9-11. Turned out the- Red Cross promise to give every dime to victims, first responders, and families there-of turned out to actually mean 'we though you wanted to buy us a new phone system!"

Farkers. Worse then useless...
 
2012-11-02 02:36:01 AM
My inlaws live in Jersey and three are shortages of everything (they stocked up) but the electrical crews and tree-clearing services are hopelessly overloaded. I was born and brought up on Staten Island and some SMSs confirmed that they have also been badly hammered. Any state that does not regularly have such storms are not going to have the resources to recover. Florida and other Gulf area states are better equipped but obviously still suffer. Sucks.
 
2012-11-02 07:07:04 AM
Yeah, fark you Red Cross:

i46.tinypic.com
 

/sickening
 
2012-11-02 07:08:59 AM
Is the red cross unionized, that's all that really matters.
 
2012-11-02 08:04:10 AM

madgonad: The Red Cross is a first responder.


Really, so they can get in and put out fires, dig out people trapped in cars/trucks/trains, get the subways started again?

Usually the way it works is this: the REAL first responders (firemen and police, maybe Coast/National Guard) rescue the people, and send them to Red Cross for medical treatment (which they do have volunteer doctors/nurses). The ones that are ok physically get hoarded into appropriate vehicles and driven to the stations. Red Cross does not set up at Ground Zero unless safe and sanitary (after all, how would you like your doctor to have his scalpel dipped in raw sewage before he tries to remove shrapnel?). This is why in Katrina, they did not set up camp in New Orleans, but in various locations safe from the disaster.
 
2012-11-02 08:50:18 AM
Meanwhile they turn down power repair crews because they are non-union.

Oh sweet justice.
 
2012-11-02 09:13:01 AM
*wails at sky

"WHY DOESN'T THE GOVERNMENT DO SOMETHING!!!"
 
2012-11-02 10:41:24 AM

Silverstaff: Pontious Pilates:

People running massive nonprofits are supposed to take vows of poverty? I know the Red Cross has had their own issues, but any organization like that operates on such a huge scale that you have to have smart, effective leadership that's paid competitively.

A $500k/year salary isn't "competitive", it's exorbitant. You could get a competent administrator promoted up from within the ranks who understands the organization and its structure and culture, for well less than a quarter of that.

It's like corporations that have CEO's, hired from outside the company with no experience in the industry or knowledge of the field, and give them ludicrously large compensation on the grounds everyone else is doing it so to get a good CEO you need to pay big. There is no need for "competitive" pay, just make it a good living wage and promote from within the organization instead of treating leaders like sports stars that are recruited and traded and paid ludicrous contracts.

Making a half-million dollars a year working for any organization that calls itself "non profit" is a travesty. You don't need a "vow of poverty", but if you can't support yourself and your family well on a five-digit income outside the most ridiculously expensive places in the country, something is very wrong. 

"Oh no, our director only makes a $90k/year! We're in such bad shape and can't afford anybody who isn't a lazy bum for that kind of chump change"


And they have multiple regional managers who make in the $250,000 range (and that's just salary, their total compensation package is higher - they get good benefits).

Just like Gail McGovern, these people do not focus on managing organizations or charities that resemble the ones they end up heading. Instead they manage other businesses (Gail is from AT & T), but sit on the boards of colleges or what-not. This prepares them to go to lots of long, boring meetings and follow the Brown Act, but it does not give them on-the-ground experience on how to respond to emergencies.

Red Cross, if you're listening, start hiring your CEO's and managers from within. Pay them less. There are thousands of unemployed managerial types, it's no longer "but we have to pay that much to get anyone at all to work for us." Nope, you can find a CEO for $125,000 including benefits and that person will be very happy to have that compensation. Further, that person might actually be a former fire chief or someone whose actually dealt with a disaster on the ground.

Even better, hire one of the thousands of professional volunteers who've worked for you for free for years.
 
2012-11-02 12:32:04 PM
Damn those Christian Commies.
 
2012-11-02 01:11:08 PM
Two big reasons we think the Red Cross can get lost:

1.
Remember those fundraisers for relief after 9/11 and Katrina? People gave and gave. Then it came out that the money didn't go to disaster relief, it went to the "general fund" to be put back for future use. When people give money, they want it to go to helping people in need, not to be hoarded and spent on administrative expenses while people go cold and hungry. People have long memories about being ripped off, and if you hold a fundraiser for disaster relief, people expect the money to go to relief for that disaster, not generally into your pockets with a little going towards the disaster.

2.
A $500k/year salary for your head, and six-figure salaries for local chapter heads. Do you know what kind of leadership you can get for cheaper? The President of the USA has a salary of $400k/year. A four-star General/Admiral makes ~$190k/year, a one-star General/Admiral makes around $145k/year. The average State Governor makes $130k/year, with governors of some smaller states making less. You don't need to pay 500k/year to have a top-grade leader, that kind of money just gets you entitled CEO types who think more about themselves than the organization.

Here's a link to an ABC News story from last year: Link. After fires in southern California, they raised over $400,000, of which only about $150,000 went to disaster relief, the rest went to things like renovations to the San Diego chapter's headquarters, including a new phone system. The head of the San Diego chapter makes around $300,000/year.
 
2012-11-02 01:43:29 PM

WorthNoting: TDBoedy: He is living on an island full if italian-american princesses. This should explain everything.

Really ? ? ? : - O

In that case - the bootstrappy attempts at soup making - were probably EXTREMELY terrifying.

Joking aside though . . .

From reading about the condition Superstorm Sandy left Staten Island in - for the folks there to be begging for help - well, it's justified.

It's not like - people who don't want to help them - have to.

But for those who DO want to help:

Staten Island is seriously farked up and - they STILL have parts they can't even get to - complete with folks trapped there.

So they actually DO need help. That's just the reality of their circumstances right now.

Anyhow . . . focusing critically on ANY of the Staten Island folks - supposed lack of ability to express themselves "as storm victims" with verbal finesse - at this particular point in time - strikes me as being a bit unfair - is all I'm saying.

Folks there are IN SHOCK.

The ocean just ate their world. 

/feels so sad for them


Why? They live on an island in the direct path of many hurricane tracks. This was hardly a surprise. Anyone that stayed that COULD have left pretty much is winning a darwin award at this point.
 
2012-11-02 05:20:08 PM

Isildur: Yes, this guy is obviously an idiot with a bunch of misplaced frustration


On reflection, this may not have been fair of me. I don't know enough of the facts to be making such a declaration one way or another.
 
2012-11-02 07:26:16 PM

TDBoedy: Why? They live on an island in the direct path of many hurricane tracks. This was hardly a surprise. Anyone that stayed that COULD have left pretty much is winning a darwin award at this point.


It's not exactly the Bahamas. There have been a whopping 14 October hurricanes that have affected the state of New York since the 17th century. That's out of 85 total.
 
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