If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Wired)   How many times do coastal homes need to be washed away before we say we shouldn't be building homes here any more?   (wired.com) divider line 233
    More: Obvious, seat belt laws, electrical equipment, irrigation sprinklers, effects of global warming, catastrophe theory, economic values, extreme weather, foils  
•       •       •

12368 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Oct 2012 at 4:29 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



233 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-10-31 06:48:45 PM
The wise man built his house upon the Rock,
The wise man built his house upon the Rock,
The wise man built his house upon the Rock,
And the rains came tumbling down.
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
But the house on the Rock stood firm.
The foolish man built his house upon the sand,
The foolish man built his house upon the sand,
The foolish man built his house upon the sand,
And the rains came tumbling down.
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
And the house on the sand fell flat.
So build your life on the Lord Jesus Christ,
So build your life on the Lord Jesus Christ,
So build your life on the Lord Jesus Christ,
And the blessings will come down.
The blessings come down as your prayers go up,
The blessings come down as your prayers go up,
The blessings come down as your prayers go up,
So build your life on the Lord.
 
2012-10-31 06:57:33 PM

knbber2: There is a significant portion of the scientific community that disagrees with the causes of global warming.


No. Buh-bye.
 
2012-10-31 07:00:57 PM

cryinoutloud: knbber2: There is a significant portion of the scientific community that disagrees with the causes of global warming.

No. Buh-bye.


That portion is neither significant, nor very scientific. The VAST majority of scientists agree with the theory of global warming.
 
2012-10-31 07:21:01 PM
people will never stop building by the water (or other attractive areas at risk for major disaste) nor should they

buildings will fall and will be rebuilt. nothing will change so the question is moot
 
2012-10-31 07:21:12 PM

ElFugawz: [Picture of NY]
"Maybe homes shouldn't be worth $10 million when they're on the coast and every five years the coast will be flooded and the home will be destroyed"

Juxtaposition fail. I don't recall NY or NJ, even the barrier islands, taking this pounding in the last 3 h, at least. Even so, I have friends with places on the south jersey shore that are fine.


The last time something of this magnitude hit NJ is probably the hurricane of 1962. My wife was 4 at the ti
 
2012-10-31 07:22:32 PM

HailRobonia: When I first came here, this was all swamp. Everyone said I was daft to build a castle on a swamp, but I built in all the same, just to show them. It sank into the swamp. So I built a second one. That sank into the swamp. So I built a third. That burned down, fell over, then sank into the swamp. But the fourth one stayed up. And that's what you're going to get, Lad, the strongest castle in all of England.


I know I'm late and I did not read this thread from your post forward-yet.
I hope I'm not the first, but

"What, the curtains?"
 
2012-10-31 07:24:08 PM
Dammit. My wife was 4 years old and clearly remembers houses floating the bay at Long Beach Island, NJ. Her parents had a cottage on the island.
 
2012-10-31 07:24:59 PM

amoral: Bontesla:
Finally, if you have all of this evidence to support your argument then you should provide it.

Says the guy who cites no evidence, and uses insults to further his arguments.


Nice handle
 
2012-10-31 07:26:33 PM

simplicimus: FrinkLemur: Relevant:
Swamp Castle (clicky-pop)
"The third one burned down, fell over, and fell into the swamp, but the FOURTH ONE STAYED UP!"

King of Swamp Castle: One day, lad, all this will be yours.
Prince Herbert: What, the curtains?
King of Swamp Castle: No, not the curtains, lad, all that you can see stretched out over the valleys and the hills! That'll be your kingdom, lad.


Whew.

Thank you.
 
2012-10-31 07:28:24 PM
Here in Missouri we took land that was in the Missouri River flood plains and gave it to the Army Corps of Engineers for "Reclamation". So basically we made it the Governments problem.

I must admit it keeps the dumbasses from rebuilding there.
 
2012-10-31 07:34:29 PM

InitialCommentGuy: revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

Used to be a time when we didn't build million dollar homes in hurricane prone areas. My grandfather was a skilled trade carpenter, and built himself a little cottage on a nice slice of beachfront property he gained due to having money set aside during the Depression. I loved that place as a kid: roughing it, a little Black and White TV, old deisel genny, a couple radios.

It was where my dad was conceived, and where my gramps finally ended life with a little bit of salt wind blowing in off the Atlantic. We had to sell off the land due to his illness and my grandmother and uncle being injured in a car accident. I always wondered what had happened to the place after we got rid of it, and it was where my grandmother wanted to be spread along with gramp's ashes.

Went to the place about six months after she passed to find someone you've probably listened to on the radio had purchased the lot along with ten or so others to build a nice little seaside palace.

They saw me roll up in Gramp's old beat down pickup and thought I was a bum. Explained the situation, and asked if I could just lay them to rest. Buried them with my great grandfather's shovel from his days building the railroads, said a prayer, and went off. Guy put a little marker there out of his own pocket and we went out for drinks.

When he asked about the story of my family... That look of contempt, that was when I went off and didn't look back.

Went a few years ago to find the little town I knew was pretty much all multimillion dollar houses, and the little shops and boardwalk had been replaced with coffee houses, t-shirt shops, and whiny rich tourist. It is amazing to watch when the socioeconomic trends of such a lifestyle change so much in so short of time.


boo hoo
 
2012-10-31 07:44:55 PM

wookiee cookie: InitialCommentGuy: revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

Used to be a time when we didn't build million dollar homes in hurricane prone areas. My grandfather was a skilled trade carpenter, and built himself a little cottage on a nice slice of beachfront property he gained due to having money set aside during the Depression. I loved that place as a kid: roughing it, a little Black and White TV, old deisel genny, a couple radios.

It was where my dad was conceived, and where my gramps finally ended life with a little bit of salt wind blowing in off the Atlantic. We had to sell off the land due to his illness and my grandmother and uncle being injured in a car accident. I always wondered what had happened to the place after we got rid of it, and it was where my grandmother wanted to be spread along with gramp's ashes.

Went to the place about six months after she passed to find someone you've probably listened to on the radio had purchased the lot along with ten or so others to build a nice little seaside palace.

They saw me roll up in Gramp's old beat down pickup and thought I was a bum. Explained the situation, and asked if I could just lay them to rest. Buried them with my great grandfather's shovel from his days building the railroads, said a prayer, and went off. Guy put a little marker there out of his own pocket and we went out for drinks.

When he asked about the story of my family... That look of contempt, that was when I went off and didn't look back.

Went a few years ago to find the little town I knew was pretty much all multimillion dollar houses, and the little shops and boardwalk had been replaced with coffee houses, t-shirt shops, and whiny rich tourist. It is amazing to watch when the socioeconomic trends of such a lifestyle change so much in so short of time.

boo hoo


Awesome response.
 
2012-10-31 08:01:40 PM
There's nothing new under the sun.

Sea level been going up for 13,000 years, people.
It's how the Chesapeake Bay formed in what was once the Susquehanna River valley.
It's why what is now the submerged continental shelf stopped being Atlantic beachfront property.
 
2012-10-31 08:15:53 PM

phrawgh: We have teh technology.

[msnbcmedia1.msn.com image 474x326]
[www.domeincorporated.com image 584x392]


"Far-out" architecture almost always seems to have more issues with keeping the elements out. Most of Frank lloyd Wright's shiat developed structural issues. Geodesic dome? Fark no. Difficult to waterproof to begin with. Very nearly impossible to keep waterproof for more than a couple of seasons. Spectacularly wasteful of materials, too.
 
2012-10-31 08:16:37 PM

dj_bigbird: Who cares where someone builds their house at? If they (along with their insurance co.) want to accept the risk, I say let them. But don't expect any help from the government.


Why not? Everybody else is getting something from the government. If we ban stupid people from government relief, we don't need the government at all. It's there to help stupid and foolish people. Rescuing the unprepared and incompetent is one of the primary functions of our system.

/More! Give us more MORE MORE!
 
2012-10-31 08:17:05 PM

InitialCommentGuy: wookiee cookie: InitialCommentGuy: revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

Used to be a time when we didn't build million dollar homes in hurricane prone areas. My grandfather was a skilled trade carpenter, and built himself a little cottage on a nice slice of beachfront property he gained due to having money set aside during the Depression. I loved that place as a kid: roughing it, a little Black and White TV, old deisel genny, a couple radios.

It was where my dad was conceived, and where my gramps finally ended life with a little bit of salt wind blowing in off the Atlantic. We had to sell off the land due to his illness and my grandmother and uncle being injured in a car accident. I always wondered what had happened to the place after we got rid of it, and it was where my grandmother wanted to be spread along with gramp's ashes.

Went to the place about six months after she passed to find someone you've probably listened to on the radio had purchased the lot along with ten or so others to build a nice little seaside palace.

They saw me roll up in Gramp's old beat down pickup and thought I was a bum. Explained the situation, and asked if I could just lay them to rest. Buried them with my great grandfather's shovel from his days building the railroads, said a prayer, and went off. Guy put a little marker there out of his own pocket and we went out for drinks.

When he asked about the story of my family... That look of contempt, that was when I went off and didn't look back.

Went a few years ago to find the little town I knew was pretty much all multimillion dollar houses, and the little shops and boardwalk had been replaced with coffee houses, t-shirt shops, and whiny rich tourist. It is amazing to watch when the socioeconomic trends of such a lifestyle change so much in so short of time.

boo hoo

Awesome response.


thank you! seemed like an appropriate response to a wall of pointless shmaltz and nostalgia-fapping

protip: the only thing that's constant is change. now try not to die bitter.
 
2012-10-31 08:19:44 PM

knbber2: Bontesla: I don't insult everyone immediately. Only those willfully ignorant at the expense of others. This is what you are.

Once again, immediately to the insult to try to demean me. There is a significant portion of the scientific community that disagrees with the causes of global warming. As far as fracking goes, the percentage is higher. And no, I am not going to search around for the numbers, as you did not either, that is not my point. You have your opinions, which is your right, I have mine. Fark is a place to express those opinions. If you need to tell someone who disagrees with your opinions to be ignorant in the corner, you need to get a thicker skin. Have a nice day, no hard feelings from this side.


Class act. Well done.
 
2012-10-31 08:32:14 PM

InitialCommentGuy: wookiee cookie: InitialCommentGuy: revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

Used to be a time when we didn't build million dollar homes in hurricane prone areas. My grandfather was a skilled trade carpenter, and built himself a little cottage on a nice slice of beachfront property he gained due to having money set aside during the Depression. I loved that place as a kid: roughing it, a little Black and White TV, old deisel genny, a couple radios.

It was where my dad was conceived, and where my gramps finally ended life with a little bit of salt wind blowing in off the Atlantic. We had to sell off the land due to his illness and my grandmother and uncle being injured in a car accident. I always wondered what had happened to the place after we got rid of it, and it was where my grandmother wanted to be spread along with gramp's ashes.

Went to the place about six months after she passed to find someone you've probably listened to on the radio had purchased the lot along with ten or so others to build a nice little seaside palace.

They saw me roll up in Gramp's old beat down pickup and thought I was a bum. Explained the situation, and asked if I could just lay them to rest. Buried them with my great grandfather's shovel from his days building the railroads, said a prayer, and went off. Guy put a little marker there out of his own pocket and we went out for drinks.

When he asked about the story of my family... That look of contempt, that was when I went off and didn't look back.

Went a few years ago to find the little town I knew was pretty much all multimillion dollar houses, and the little shops and boardwalk had been replaced with coffee houses, t-shirt shops, and whiny rich tourist. It is amazing to watch when the socioeconomic trends of such a lifestyle change so much in so short of time.

boo hoo

Awesome response.


one other thing, at first i sympathized with you when you mentioned the dude's look of contempt, but then i realized you probably regaled the dude with the same "i just a humble bum" holier-than-thou sanctimony you posted here
 
2012-10-31 08:48:29 PM
As for NJ, this is by far the worst coastal flooding in anyone's living memory. The vast majority of those houses have never experienced any type of flooding, and many of them were built 50, 60, 70 years ago or more. The only area that I'm aware of along the shore that has been seriously devastated by storm flooding in the last 50 years is Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island, and since then it's been a municipal code requirement that new houses in flood zones be built on stilts. Seriously, the most damage that happens to the shore year after year is damage to local boardwalks and piers, and those are owned by the municipalities - and yet no one minds when they get rebuilt year after year.

As far as rebuilding someone's vacation home, a lot of those NJ shore communities have a decent percentage of year-round residents whose houses are their only homes.

And if you seriously think that houses shouldn't exist in storm flood areas then don't rent that next shore house, since you're only reinforcing the financial incentive for people to build them there.
 
2012-10-31 08:51:06 PM
It is rather awesome here in NC. They tried to introduce new laws to deal with the higher water levels, and they got blocked by politicians saying it was all a secret plot by Obama to destroy capitalism by increasing the cost of that several hundred dollar home by a couple more thousand.
 
2012-10-31 08:51:43 PM

The Great Gazoo: As for NJ, this is by far the worst coastal flooding in anyone's living memory. The vast majority of those houses have never experienced any type of flooding, and many of them were built 50, 60, 70 years ago or more. The only area that I'm aware of along the shore that has been seriously devastated by storm flooding in the last 50 years is Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island, and since then it's been a municipal code requirement that new houses in flood zones be built on stilts. Seriously, the most damage that happens to the shore year after year is damage to local boardwalks and piers, and those are owned by the municipalities - and yet no one minds when they get rebuilt year after year.

As far as rebuilding someone's vacation home, a lot of those NJ shore communities have a decent percentage of year-round residents whose houses are their only homes.

And if you seriously think that houses shouldn't exist in storm flood areas then don't rent that next shore house, since you're only reinforcing the financial incentive for people to build them there.


It's okay if the houses exist, but their risk shouldn't be socialized.
 
2012-10-31 08:51:53 PM
My only hope is that the greater % of the destruction happened to those who thought NO shouldn't rebuild
 
2012-10-31 09:02:16 PM

Eddie Adams from Torrance: Why can't we just move New York, Boston, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Miami, San Diego, Charleston, Houston and Tampa 10 miles further inland? There can't be more than 50 million people living near the coast.


I'm on a hill at 550ft. in SF that's made of bedrock. No landslides and no liquifaction. The house is 75+ years old and has weathers many a quake.

Not moving.

Pay for my own insurance.

If something happens that I need a FEMA loan -- I'll take the loan and repay it along with the interest.
 
2012-10-31 09:07:23 PM

Rent Party: mcreadyblue: Rent Party: The morons that built or bought these deserve every last thing that happens to them.

They are still standing and not flooded.

You do understand that when those were built, they were built on dry land.

The thing about sand bars is that they move. Those places are going to be hundreds of yards out to sea in a few more years.


Dry land and sand bars are two different things.
 
2012-10-31 09:17:57 PM

Ashrams: And now idiots!

"well I may be an idiot but I'm no fool"


"I'm no fool."
 
2012-10-31 09:23:54 PM

JackieRabbit: dj_bigbird: Who cares where someone builds their house at? If they (along with their insurance co.) want to accept the risk, I say let them. But don't expect any help from the government.

You should care, that's who. Where do you think insurance companies go to recover their losses? To YOU. That's what insurance is all about: sharing risks. If someone is engaging in risky behavior that causes your insurance company huge losses, losses that you have to help pay for with higher premiums and lower coverages, you should speak up.


Well if the underwriter failed to set the premium based upon a risky location, that's not the policy holder's fault.

It used to be that underwrites and loan officers protected the capital and savings of those participating in the pool of risk or investment, then they deregulated everything and allowed them to engage risky loans and policies then repackage them as Grade AAA investment vehicles (and hiding the risk from the suckers who bought the lies) so that they gained a quick profit and offloaded the risk.

In the old days, that was called "fraud", now it's called the "Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999"
 
2012-10-31 09:32:06 PM

Eddie Adams from Torrance: Why can't we just move New York, Boston, New Orleans, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Miami, San Diego, Charleston, Houston and Tampa 10 miles further inland? There can't be more than 50 million people living near the coast.


There are 60 million in the floodplain between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic; and some 26 million living in Coastal California. It's predicted that with droughts and collapse of farming and industry in the nation's interior, 80% of us will be living within 40 miles of a coast by 2020.

Of course, not all coasts are alike, but the Atlantic Seaboard doesn't have much of a rapid rise in elevation in most of its urban areas (compared to San Francisco, where they can all go stand on their many hills).
 
2012-10-31 09:36:05 PM

Girion47: The Great Gazoo: As for NJ, this is by far the worst coastal flooding in anyone's living memory. The vast majority of those houses have never experienced any type of flooding, and many of them were built 50, 60, 70 years ago or more. The only area that I'm aware of along the shore that has been seriously devastated by storm flooding in the last 50 years is Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island, and since then it's been a municipal code requirement that new houses in flood zones be built on stilts. Seriously, the most damage that happens to the shore year after year is damage to local boardwalks and piers, and those are owned by the municipalities - and yet no one minds when they get rebuilt year after year.

As far as rebuilding someone's vacation home, a lot of those NJ shore communities have a decent percentage of year-round residents whose houses are their only homes.

And if you seriously think that houses shouldn't exist in storm flood areas then don't rent that next shore house, since you're only reinforcing the financial incentive for people to build them there.

It's okay if the houses exist, but their risk shouldn't be socialized.


But it is, in oh so many ways.
 
2012-10-31 09:46:03 PM

orbister: Dear America

Why not stop building houses out of wood and start using things like "brick", "cement" or even "stone"? Then your residential areas might stop turning into lumber yards every time the wind blows.

Love

The Rest of the World


images.wikia.com

FTFY
 
2012-10-31 10:16:10 PM
i14.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-31 10:29:16 PM

wookiee cookie: InitialCommentGuy: wookiee cookie: InitialCommentGuy: revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

Used to be a time when we didn't build million dollar homes in hurricane prone areas. My grandfather was a skilled trade carpenter, and built himself a little cottage on a nice slice of beachfront property he gained due to having money set aside during the Depression. I loved that place as a kid: roughing it, a little Black and White TV, old deisel genny, a couple radios.

It was where my dad was conceived, and where my gramps finally ended life with a little bit of salt wind blowing in off the Atlantic. We had to sell off the land due to his illness and my grandmother and uncle being injured in a car accident. I always wondered what had happened to the place after we got rid of it, and it was where my grandmother wanted to be spread along with gramp's ashes.

Went to the place about six months after she passed to find someone you've probably listened to on the radio had purchased the lot along with ten or so others to build a nice little seaside palace.

They saw me roll up in Gramp's old beat down pickup and thought I was a bum. Explained the situation, and asked if I could just lay them to rest. Buried them with my great grandfather's shovel from his days building the railroads, said a prayer, and went off. Guy put a little marker there out of his own pocket and we went out for drinks.

When he asked about the story of my family... That look of contempt, that was when I went off and didn't look back.

Went a few years ago to find the little town I knew was pretty much all multimillion dollar houses, and the little shops and boardwalk had been replaced with coffee houses, t-shirt shops, and whiny rich tourist. It is amazing to watch when the socioeconomic trends of such a lifestyle change so much in so short of time.

boo hoo

Awesome response.

one other thing, at first i sympathized with you when you mentioned the dude's lo ...


You sound quite bootstrappy and unable to understand the point. Good job.
 
2012-10-31 10:55:10 PM

revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

 
2012-10-31 11:41:25 PM
New Mexico takes in more money than it pays back to the Federal Government.

I guess Los Alamos, White Sands, etc. only benefits New Mexico?

Same applies to Texas....NASA only helps Texas, and Ft. Hood only deploys troops to defend Texas.
 
2012-10-31 11:44:01 PM

orbister: Dear America

Why not stop building houses out of wood and start using things like "brick", "cement" or even "stone"? Then your residential areas might stop turning into lumber yards every time the wind blows.

Love

The Rest of the World


Wood-framed house in an earthquake zone = cracks in the plaster.

Unreinforced masonry in an earthquake zone = house in the basement.

See: San Francisco, 1906, 1989, etc.; Los Angeles-Long Beach, 1933, 1994; etc. etc.
 
2012-11-01 12:00:04 AM
I'm guessing that many parts of lower Manhattan (that flooded) were not considered in the highest risk flood zone for insurance purposes.
 
2012-11-01 12:13:17 AM

forgotmydamnusername: phrawgh: We have teh technology.

[msnbcmedia1.msn.com image 474x326]
[www.domeincorporated.com image 584x392]

"Far-out" architecture almost always seems to have more issues with keeping the elements out. Most of Frank lloyd Wright's shiat developed structural issues. Geodesic dome? Fark no. Difficult to waterproof to begin with. Very nearly impossible to keep waterproof for more than a couple of seasons. Spectacularly wasteful of materials, too.


check yourself!

These concrete domes have already survived multiple hurricanes.

Google hurricane proof domes

They are good in tornado, earthquake and fire zones as well. Proven technology that is also energy efficient, cost effective, low maintenance, and quite waterproof. These aren't your fathers whimsical Frank Lloyd Wright creations. The engineering is solid.
 
2012-11-01 12:28:21 AM

vernonFL: The answer, my friend, is blowin in the wind


This
 
2012-11-01 01:14:58 AM
For a country with a such a hard-on for the free market I am amazed that it is acceptable for the government to fork out billions to compensate for these bad decisions. I suppose it is one thing to leave poorer people to fend for themselves and quite another to suggest that the homeowner middle class pay their own way.

If the market finds it uninsurable, there's a reason. I remember a while back someone was complaining that the government needed to help them because the insurance company wanted 5% of the value of their house every year...in an area that gets wiped out about every 20 years.

For the government to step in and pin that cost on the backs of other taxpayers is madness. Take that out of the equation and the problem can start to solve itself.
 
2012-11-01 01:29:50 AM
Fine with me.

Make the whole area a state park that everyone can enjoy. What a concept.
 
2012-11-01 01:56:03 AM

whidbey: Fine with me.

Make the whole area a state park that everyone can enjoy. What a concept.


Like this?

This is a map of what WAS downtown Hilo's waterfrontdistrict until it was taken out in 1960 by a tsunami. They moved downtown to somewhat higher ground, built a breakwater to take some energy out of a direct hit.

It's now a public park.
 
2012-11-01 02:22:19 AM

Bladel: As resident of Iowa during the 2001 floods, I will ask: Why don't NY/NJ build a 30' floodwall?


my sister lives at Highland Lakes, New Jersey ... Elevation, 1,217 ft

i'll be sure to inquire about that 30' flood wall
 
2012-11-01 06:20:24 AM

Rent Party: revrendjim: Someone who can afford a beach house can afford another beach house.

They can also afford a city council member or two to ensure their zoning doesn't change. They can also afford a congressman or three to ensure that federal aid is there when they want to bootstrap up another house built on a sand bar in a hurricane zone.

This isn't going to change because it directly effects the people in control of the system.


yep.
my first thought about the article was:
"cool! at least greedy A-holes will stop to keep nices places for themselves"
but no, they won't.
They are just gona waist even more resources to do so.
 
2012-11-01 06:30:06 AM

muck4doo: The wise man built his house upon the Rock,
The wise man built his house upon the Rock,
The wise man built his house upon the Rock,
And the rains came tumbling down.
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
But the house on the Rock stood firm.
The foolish man built his house upon the sand,
The foolish man built his house upon the sand,
The foolish man built his house upon the sand,
And the rains came tumbling down.
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
The rains came down and the floods came up,
And the house on the sand fell flat.
So build your life on the Lord Jesus Christ,
So build your life on the Lord Jesus Christ,
So build your life on the Lord Jesus Christ,
And the blessings will come down.
The blessings come down as your prayers go up,
The blessings come down as your prayers go up,
The blessings come down as your prayers go up,
So build your life on the Lord.


drgullo.com
 
2012-11-01 06:38:56 AM
If we are talking about rich people building beachfront houses and expecting them to be rebuilt at someone else's expense, that's a fairly narrow issue.
The general issue of society subsidizing people who live and work in risky places is a little more complex. Civilization has a vested interest in some of it's members living and working in risky places.
Risky places get settled for economic reasons. Society as a whole benefits when people farm volcanic fields or alluvial planes, or create seaports at river floodplains. Of necessity, both rewards and risks end up getting shared. It isn't simple, except to the simple-minded.
 
2012-11-01 06:51:13 AM
*makes sure every base has these*
i.imgur.com 

*convinces council to melt the polar caps*
 
2012-11-01 07:23:55 AM

amoral: Bontesla:
Finally, if you have all of this evidence to support your argument then you should provide it.

Says the guy who cites no evidence, and uses insults to further his arguments.


I asked for evidence
He did not.
Your argument is invalid based on the exchange.
I'm a woman.

:)
 
2012-11-01 07:31:29 AM

Rent Party: Dear Rest of the World,

Regarding your latest inquiry. It is because we have trees here.

Sincerely,

America.


Dear America

Trees are not unknown elsewhere in the world. As, however, Little Piggy #2 discovered the hard way, while delightful to look at and of undoubted utility in the manufacture of certain housing components, they are of limited utility when the Big Band Wolf huffs and puffs.

Regards

Your friends in the end house. The one still standing.
 
2012-11-01 07:34:36 AM

LibertyHiller: orbister: Dear America

Why not stop building houses out of wood and start using things like "brick", "cement" or even "stone"? Then your residential areas might stop turning into lumber yards every time the wind blows.

Love

The Rest of the World

Wood-framed house in an earthquake zone = cracks in the plaster.

Unreinforced masonry in an earthquake zone = house in the basement.

See: San Francisco, 1906, 1989, etc.; Los Angeles-Long Beach, 1933, 1994; etc. etc.


How big is the earthquake problem in Noo Joisey?
 
2012-11-01 07:43:50 AM

Fade2black: Bontesla: knbber2: Bontesla: I don't insult everyone immediately. Only those willfully ignorant at the expense of others. This is what you are.

Once again, immediately to the insult to try to demean me. There is a significant portion of the scientific community that disagrees with the causes of global warming. As far as fracking goes, the percentage is higher. And no, I am not going to search around for the numbers, as you did not either, that is not my point. You have your opinions, which is your right, I have mine. Fark is a place to express those opinions. If you need to tell someone who disagrees with your opinions to be ignorant in the corner, you need to get a thicker skin. Have a nice day, no hard feelings from this side.

I respectfully disagree with many.

I'm simply being honest. Yes - calling you ignorant is insulting. But that doesn't mean I'm wrong. I can offend a thief by calling them a thief - but does that make me wrong? No. Could I find a more polite way to call you ignorant? Probably.

But what incentive do I have to politely search for a word to call you ignorant when your ignorance attributes to a dangerous situation?

Finally, if you have all of this evidence to support your argument then you should provide it.

You could just man up like all the other liberal douches and call someone hitler to shut them down when your counter-argument has no validity. Or go for the non-passé and just use correlation/causation...either way without numbers for YOUR argument, you're just as ignorant as you make everyone out to be.


Why would I call someone Hitler? I didn't see Hitler in the thread.

You don't understand nuance so I'm also calling you ignorant.

If you want to be descripted as something more positive then be something more positive.
 
2012-11-01 08:52:37 AM
The real question is:

How many times do we have to hear of falling trees leading to death and destruction before we go and remove any tree within 30 yards of any human frequented area.

Seriously... falling trees are #2 in damage output during storms next to floods at #1. Sandy proved it. Of all the deaths I heard about on the news I think only 1 was not related to a tree falling.
 
Displayed 50 of 233 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report