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(Washington Post)   Before and after photos of locations hit by Hurricane Sandy   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 198
    More: Interesting  
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28471 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Oct 2012 at 10:35 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-31 11:34:58 AM  
I want to see some aerial shots of Jersey like they made of Texas after Ike.

This is destruction:

graphics8.nytimes.com 

Bolivar Peninsula got pounded/leveled.

I hope all those in the path of Sandy are recovering well.
 
2012-10-31 11:35:10 AM  

dothemath: jack21221: dothemath: "Wow, it's almost like a huge amount of water washed pushed into the city by strong winds.
I'm sorry your shiat got farked up but let's stop with the 20 inch headlines every time you find a light pole knocked down or a flooded parking garage."
-Houston, Texas

Yeah, but this time the water was pushed into a REAL city, not some podunk town like Houston.

Yes, a REAL city that, apparently has never seen a big rainstorm before. I hope the NYT doesn't run out of ink, haha.


That water wasn't from the rain, you idiot.
 
2012-10-31 11:36:56 AM  
Before:

i.imgur.com

After:

i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-31 11:37:29 AM  

mjohnson71: kvinesknows: why in gods name would people park underground when there is risk of flooding?

This right here. I know parking is gawd-awful expensive and challenging in New York City: but if I lived there and had a car, my first move would have been to get that thing uptown and into an above ground garage.

IMHO any of those people who submit an insurance claim for a flooded car in lower Manhattan should have it denied.


You don't seem to get the concept of limited parking space. Uptown garage-space is not infinite; it is also very expensive.
 
2012-10-31 11:37:45 AM  

HotIgneous Intruder: mjohnson71: They probably had already paid monthly parking in those underground garages didn't want to pay again for safer parking.

Cheaper to drive to Albany and put the car in Long Term Parking at the airport.


Probably; but still cheaper than replacing your car.

Hell, I've been to NYC multiple times and parked my car at a friend's in Yonkers then taken the train the rest of the way into Manhattan. Worked great.
 
2012-10-31 11:37:46 AM  
That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:



i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-31 11:38:31 AM  

mjohnson71: Hardly. I lived in Chicago for a couple of years and darn well know the challenges of big city parking. I'm sure there were a number of options more uptown and above ground: those people were just being cheap. They probably had already paid monthly parking in those underground garages didn't want to pay again for safer parking.

I knew people in Chicago who thought I was a freak for moving my car to a covered garage when a big ice or snow storm was forecasted.


I'm absolutely certain that you are correct that this was most of it. There's actually a story today about a parking attendant who drowned in a basement garage, despite getting repeated warnings that they were free to leave. Apparently, they just had no idea that this was a realistic fear, and I'd imagine that many others thought their cars were safer under the ground than above it.

That said, I could have phrased that better by saying "people who needed it" rather than "people who wanted it", but anecdotally, I do believe that above ground parking is much, much more widely available in downtown Chicago than in Manhattan.
 
2012-10-31 11:39:28 AM  

Ashrams: And here on the West coast were people are smart enough not to live in a hurricane alley, our before and after photos

Before
[bestof.longislandpress.com image 400x359]

After
[www.mauibeachtanning.net image 450x335]


Yeah, why live in hurricane alley when you can live on the most active fault line in the continent.
 
2012-10-31 11:39:31 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: thornhill: Obama needs to splice together Romney mocking him on rising sea level with NJ cities being under watered and downtown Manhattan flooded.

Rising sea levels and storm surge from a hurricane are not the same thing.

Not saying that it's not occurring; this would just be a stupid example.


Wait, we're suddenly concerned with the hard facts?

All the ad needs to say is: this is what will happen more often when the sea level rises.
 
2012-10-31 11:40:37 AM  

Clemkadidlefark: God Bless all the people affected.

(you do know this is going to happen again, right?)


Yep, God does work in mysterious ways.
 
2012-10-31 11:40:41 AM  

you have pee hands: Ashrams: And here on the West coast were people are smart enough not to live in a hurricane alley, our before and after photos

Before
[bestof.longislandpress.com image 400x359]

After
[www.mauibeachtanning.net image 450x335]

You avoid the hurricanes but at least the ground out here has the good sense to stay put.


When the ground is shaking it is not all bad
img-cache.cdn.gaiaonline.com

I had a better pic but Fark kept Farking it up
 
2012-10-31 11:41:46 AM  

fatalvenom: WienerButt: This storm was some serious shiat.

/Floridian

While I'm not taking away from the destruction in any way, I think that Florida is constructed so that a lot of the damage you see up there wouldn't happen here. Of course if the storm is a Cat 4 or 5, that's a game changer.


Yes, job-killing regulations about making buildings being able to withstand hurricanes when you build in a hurricane zone are usually worth it. Same with earthquake zoning in California.

I am also guessing that Florida doesn't have much in the way of underground parking/ subway systems/basements for the exact same reason. Water comes in, floods, then recedes. But I could be wrong about that, as I'm not too well versed on Florida infrastructure.
 
2012-10-31 11:42:22 AM  

thornhill: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: thornhill: Obama needs to splice together Romney mocking him on rising sea level with NJ cities being under watered and downtown Manhattan flooded.

Rising sea levels and storm surge from a hurricane are not the same thing.

Not saying that it's not occurring; this would just be a stupid example.

Wait, we're suddenly concerned with the hard facts?

All the ad needs to say is: this is what will happen more often when the sea level rises.



benfry.com 

In that case, he should also include this chart. Since hard facts don't matter.
 
2012-10-31 11:43:01 AM  

Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:

[i.imgur.com image 739x541]


My parents are headed there now to check the damage on their house. I am headed down this weekend to help in any way I can (which includes staying away if that is what we are told)

I picked up garbage for the houses that burned down (and many more) for a little over two years. The video was horrifying when I saw it.
 
2012-10-31 11:43:36 AM  

Heron: mjohnson71: kvinesknows: why in gods name would people park underground when there is risk of flooding?

This right here. I know parking is gawd-awful expensive and challenging in New York City: but if I lived there and had a car, my first move would have been to get that thing uptown and into an above ground garage.

IMHO any of those people who submit an insurance claim for a flooded car in lower Manhattan should have it denied.

You don't seem to get the concept of limited parking space. Uptown garage-space is not infinite; it is also very expensive.


I get the concept and know it's farking expensive: I've paid the $75 a night to park at the Marriott Marquis. I'm just saying there shouldn't have been a single car at or below ground level south of Houston Street.
 
2012-10-31 11:44:33 AM  

Ashrams: And here on the West coast were people are smart enough not to live in a hurricane alley, our before and after photos

Before
[bestof.longislandpress.com image 400x359]

After
[www.mauibeachtanning.net image 450x335]


*facepalm* Yes; New York and New Jersey get hit with hurricanes all the friggin time. This post is about as stupid as all those ones we got after Katrina and Rita saying the same-damn-thing to Texans and Louisianians. Just wait. As volatile as the weather is getting, it won't be too long before California gets hit with a mild typhoon and, as a result of your shiatty, century-old levy system, floods all the hell and gone.
 
2012-10-31 11:46:31 AM  

Gunny Highway: Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:

[i.imgur.com image 739x541]

My parents are headed there now to check the damage on their house. I am headed down this weekend to help in any way I can (which includes staying away if that is what we are told)

I picked up garbage for the houses that burned down (and many more) for a little over two years. The video was horrifying when I saw it.


Hope there is at least something left of your parents' house, what a nightmare they're having out there.
 
2012-10-31 11:47:46 AM  

snowshovel: fatalvenom: WienerButt: This storm was some serious shiat.

/Floridian

While I'm not taking away from the destruction in any way, I think that Florida is constructed so that a lot of the damage you see up there wouldn't happen here. Of course if the storm is a Cat 4 or 5, that's a game changer.

Yes, job-killing regulations about making buildings being able to withstand hurricanes when you build in a hurricane zone are usually worth it. Same with earthquake zoning in California.

I am also guessing that Florida doesn't have much in the way of underground parking/ subway systems/basements for the exact same reason. Water comes in, floods, then recedes. But I could be wrong about that, as I'm not too well versed on Florida infrastructure.


I don't know about job killing regulations, but yes, it would make sense to build things to a code so what happened up there doesn't happen to that extent here.

That's kind of a duh.
 
2012-10-31 11:49:08 AM  

Yanks_RSJ: Gunny Highway: Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:

[i.imgur.com image 739x541]

My parents are headed there now to check the damage on their house. I am headed down this weekend to help in any way I can (which includes staying away if that is what we are told)

I picked up garbage for the houses that burned down (and many more) for a little over two years. The video was horrifying when I saw it.

Hope there is at least something left of your parents' house, what a nightmare they're having out there.


Thanks, man. Nobody was seriously hurt in Breezy and that is what is important. The town is strong very tight knit. It can be annoying at times but it is a blessing in times like these.
 
2012-10-31 11:51:48 AM  

fatalvenom: WienerButt: This storm was some serious shiat.

/Floridian

While I'm not taking away from the destruction in any way, I think that Florida is constructed so that a lot of the damage you see up there wouldn't happen here. Of course if the storm is a Cat 4 or 5, that's a game changer.


Most of the problem here is that it hit a huge area that's inhabited by 50 million + people. If one out of every 500,000 gets hit by a falling tree, that's still a crowd. I don't think there are any areas that got really wiped off the map (except that huge fire in Queens that the FD couldn't get to), but moderate damage over a really huge area adds up to a big mess. The line crews from a state over can't come to help get power lines back up because they're fixing their own mess.
 
2012-10-31 11:52:58 AM  
I am also guessing that Florida doesn't have much in the way of underground parking/ subway systems/basements for the exact same reason. Water comes in, floods, then recedes. But I could be wrong about that, as I'm not too well versed on Florida infrastructure.

Florida water table is generally within a couple of feet of the surface and the structure is very porous, so very few areas where you can go too far down without flooding.
 
2012-10-31 11:53:37 AM  

Ashrams: you have pee hands: Ashrams: And here on the West coast were people are smart enough not to live in a hurricane alley, our before and after photos

Before
[bestof.longislandpress.com image 400x359]

After
[www.mauibeachtanning.net image 450x335]

You avoid the hurricanes but at least the ground out here has the good sense to stay put.

When the ground is shaking it is not all bad
[img-cache.cdn.gaiaonline.com image 128x160]

I had a better pic but Fark kept Farking it up


I'm thinking more along the line of your lovely hillsides that regularly decide to slough off for no good reason.
 
2012-10-31 11:54:18 AM  

Gunny Highway: Thanks, man. Nobody was seriously hurt in Breezy and that is what is important. The town is strong very tight knit. It can be annoying at times but it is a blessing in times like these.


Yeah, I saw one woman snap at a reporter this morning for referring to it as "Breezy Point, Queens". She said, "no, it's just Breezy Point." Gotta love that.
 
2012-10-31 11:55:25 AM  

Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:

[i.imgur.com image 739x541]


img.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-31 11:55:36 AM  

you have pee hands: fatalvenom: WienerButt: This storm was some serious shiat.

/Floridian

While I'm not taking away from the destruction in any way, I think that Florida is constructed so that a lot of the damage you see up there wouldn't happen here. Of course if the storm is a Cat 4 or 5, that's a game changer.

Most of the problem here is that it hit a huge area that's inhabited by 50 million + people. If one out of every 500,000 gets hit by a falling tree, that's still a crowd. I don't think there are any areas that got really wiped off the map (except that huge fire in Queens that the FD couldn't get to), but moderate damage over a really huge area adds up to a big mess. The line crews from a state over can't come to help get power lines back up because they're fixing their own mess.


I thought they said power crews were coming in from as far away as New Mexico and Utah?
 
2012-10-31 11:56:19 AM  

Yanks_RSJ: Gunny Highway: Thanks, man. Nobody was seriously hurt in Breezy and that is what is important. The town is strong very tight knit. It can be annoying at times but it is a blessing in times like these.

Yeah, I saw one woman snap at a reporter this morning for referring to it as "Breezy Point, Queens". She said, "no, it's just Breezy Point." Gotta love that.


Haha. I wouldnt be surprised if it was a relative. I fear that this may cause an already isolated, separatist community to get worse. But those are concerns for later.
 
2012-10-31 11:57:23 AM  

Droog8912: Yeah, why live in hurricane alley when you can live on the most active fault line in the continent.


Also: both of those pictures came from somewhere other than the West Coast, more likely Hawai'i based on the URLs, water color, and whatnot. Hawai'i, as most people are aware, is a volcanic archipelago. Tick, tock as well.
 
2012-10-31 11:58:05 AM  
So, a lot of people did not evacuate the flood zones in the city despite Bloomberg issuing a "mandatory" evacuation. A lot of these people are saying on TV right now that they had no idea how bad it would be, and are mad at the city for not doing more to warn them. That's a separate issue. My question is - what's the point of a mandatory evacuation if it's not mandatory? Seems more like a voluntary evacuation to me. If you want to issue a mandatory evacuation, you should either drag people out of their homes kicking and screaming, or issue them summons or fines if they refuse to leave. I'm not surprised that some young people tried to ride it out, but the elderly or debilitated folks who tried to stay and the parents who decided to keep their children there just blow my mind.
 
2012-10-31 11:58:08 AM  

Yanks_RSJ: Gunny Highway: Thanks, man. Nobody was seriously hurt in Breezy and that is what is important. The town is strong very tight knit. It can be annoying at times but it is a blessing in times like these.

Yeah, I saw one woman snap at a reporter this morning for referring to it as "Breezy Point, Queens". She said, "no, it's just Breezy Point." Gotta love that.


So what's the deal? They don't view themselves as part of Queens?
 
2012-10-31 12:05:03 PM  

mjohnson71: So what's the deal? They don't view themselves as part of Queens?


Not especially, it's at the far western tip of the Rockaway peninsula, which extends from southern Queens but is actually connected by roadway to Brooklyn. One of my friends grew up further east on the Rockaways in Belle Harbor and while his mailing address was Queens his high school was in Brooklyn. They have their own identity out there, mostly.
 
2012-10-31 12:07:54 PM  

freewill: mjohnson71: Or, I dunno, maybe moved the cars 20 blocks north and into an above ground parking garage?

/I know: crazy talk.

...and, for the record, I'd be genuinely surprised if that was an option. Parking is hard enough to come by when underground is an option. I sincerely doubt there is enough above ground parking in Manhattan for all the people who wanted it, so at that point, you're talking about actually leaving the city.


So you park in an illegal spot and have the city tow it to a parking lot is still a TON cheaper than having your car flooded unless it is worth more totalled. I know I would have left my car down there if I had the option.
 
2012-10-31 12:09:54 PM  

freewill: Selfish, trivial question: Did Pommes Frites (123 2nd Avenue) make it, or did it end up in the East Village dunk tank?


I have a friend who lives on 15th and 2nd, and he seems to have made it okay. Lost power though.
 
2012-10-31 12:10:23 PM  

freewill: mjohnson71: Or, I dunno, maybe moved the cars 20 blocks north and into an above ground parking garage?

/I know: crazy talk.

*shrug* Like I said, I don't think most people understood what this was or what it was going to do. As people have said on other threads, they don't exactly see a lot of this in Manhattan.

Upstate, some people were looking around at 8 PM going "well, where the fark is all the water? I guess nothing happened". They thought it was like a tornado warning, and that it was all supposed to be over in about 15 minutes. There was zero understanding of the dangers pose by sustained winds, etc. Even when it was explained to them, people just didn't 'get' what you were describing to them. To some people, it's not a real thing that can actually happen until they've seen it, and we've certainly heard plenty of quotes from NYC along those lines in the last two days or so. ("I underestimated this, it's way worse than I imagined outside", etc.)


It also was a lot worse than forecasts suggested. The highest storm surge forecast was 6 to 11 feet, for example. The storm surge at Battery Park was nearly 14 feet, and those last three feet made all the difference in overwhelming the subway system, the Brooklyn-Battery tunnel, the PATH system, and a lot of other underground infrastructure that would have survived an 11 foot surge.
 
2012-10-31 12:10:26 PM  

nonvideas: So, a lot of people did not evacuate the flood zones in the city despite Bloomberg issuing a "mandatory" evacuation. A lot of these people are saying on TV right now that they had no idea how bad it would be, and are mad at the city for not doing more to warn them. That's a separate issue. My question is - what's the point of a mandatory evacuation if it's not mandatory? Seems more like a voluntary evacuation to me. If you want to issue a mandatory evacuation, you should either drag people out of their homes kicking and screaming, or issue them summons or fines if they refuse to leave. I'm not surprised that some young people tried to ride it out, but the elderly or debilitated folks who tried to stay and the parents who decided to keep their children there just blow my mind.


Mandatory evacuations rarely involve physically dragging people from their homes. That's very, very extreme, as in, "you are facing imminent death". As a practical matter, it would generally be impossible to enforce with masses of people. It's more like "if we see you outside, we're going to yell at you", whereas in a voluntary evacuation, you aren't doing anything wrong by staying and can still reasonably expect police assistance, etc.

In any case, I think the two issues are linked. The world told the region how bad it would be. People chose not to believe it, and in the surrounding areas that weren't hit, there's still denial that we were ever in danger. There's also a fairly common "we're New Yorkers, we've seen everything, we know what's hype and what's not" attitude (observation, not criticism) that probably played a role for some people, who didn't realize that they were largely ignorant on this topic. It's deeply unfortunate, but I personally don't see a Bloomberg and Cuomo failure in it.
 
2012-10-31 12:11:07 PM  

Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:
[i.imgur.com image 739x541]


I know the folks at Breezy Point don't like it when you point out they are part of Queens, but I didn't know they decided to move to NJ.
 
2012-10-31 12:11:51 PM  

mjohnson71: I thought they said power crews were coming in from as far away as New Mexico and Utah?


Two more places with extensive experience in dealing with hurricane damage!
 
2012-10-31 12:12:11 PM  

factoryconnection: SlothB77: oblig?

How can you joke about this? Hurricane/TS Sandy was the 2nd-worst Situation to ever befall Jersey Shore!


Barack Obama hates orange people.
 
2012-10-31 12:12:20 PM  

JerkStore: [www.washingtonpost.com image 606x369]

Isn't that Lex Luthor's swimming pool?


Wow, that was... damn. Good one. 

+20 cool points for you.
 
2012-10-31 12:12:49 PM  

Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:



[i.imgur.com image 739x541]


That's Breezy Point, Queens. It's a waterfront neighborhood in NYC. No big fires on the Jersey Shore as far as I know.
 
2012-10-31 12:13:55 PM  

Yanks_RSJ: mjohnson71: So what's the deal? They don't view themselves as part of Queens?

Not especially, it's at the far western tip of the Rockaway peninsula, which extends from southern Queens but is actually connected by roadway to Brooklyn. One of my friends grew up further east on the Rockaways in Belle Harbor and while his mailing address was Queens his high school was in Brooklyn. They have their own identity out there, mostly.


Thanks. I've been to Rockaway; just never got out to Breezy Point.
 
2012-10-31 12:14:17 PM  
I hear Obama will be stopping by NY today to tour the damage.

img223.imageshack.us
 
2012-10-31 12:15:09 PM  

Verrai: Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:



[i.imgur.com image 739x541]

That's Breezy Point, Queens. It's a waterfront neighborhood in NYC. No big fires on the Jersey Shore as far as I know.


Yup, its in Queens... but there is a large fire in NJ as well...

Link
 
2012-10-31 12:15:55 PM  

mjohnson71: I thought they said power crews were coming in from as far away as New Mexico and Utah?


They do, but that's a lot harder than just bringing them in from a couple hours drive away like they normally can.
 
2012-10-31 12:17:55 PM  

Verrai: Wise_Guy: That section in Breezy Point, NJ where the fire were:



[i.imgur.com image 739x541]

That's Breezy Point, Queens. It's a waterfront neighborhood in NYC. No big fires on the Jersey Shore as far as I know.


Yeah. I was looking at pictures of both NY and NJ. My bad.
 
2012-10-31 12:18:16 PM  

Verrai: It also was a lot worse than forecasts suggested. The highest storm surge forecast was 6 to 11 feet, for example. The storm surge at Battery Park was nearly 14 feet, and those last three feet made all the difference in overwhelming the subway system, the Brooklyn-Battery tunnel, the PATH system, and a lot of other underground infrastructure that would have survived an 11 foot surge.


Yes. In my experience, the unpredictability was a big part of the gap in understanding.

"Oh, the forecast is just like a typical rainstorm here. This is no big deal."

"Sure, the forecast says that, but the forecast may suddenly change for the worst during the final hours and conditions will already be too severe for you to do anything about it. That's why the County Executive looks like she's constipated and all the National Guardsmen are assembling outside."

"Nah, it's the Weather Channel. We're fine. Cuomo just likes to be on TV. If the power goes out at my house, I'll just dine out."

*facepalm*
 
2012-10-31 12:19:18 PM  
The Jersey Shore house was practically untouched.

Black magic protects that house.
 
2012-10-31 12:19:27 PM  
"At one cemetery in Crisfield, Maryland, two caskets, one silver and the other bronze, rose up from the ground as the sheer force of the water unleashed by Sandy swelled the ground."
i.dailymail.co.uk

And today is Halloween, that seems a little scary.
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-31 12:22:30 PM  
No pics of the Apple Store in Manhattan yet? I wonder how it fared--seeing as it was built into the ground.

You may need more sandbags.
 
2012-10-31 12:22:32 PM  

star_topology: The Jersey Shore house was practically untouched.

Black magic protects that house.


The Herp is strong.
 
2012-10-31 12:22:50 PM  

Ashrams: "At one cemetery in Crisfield, Maryland, two caskets, one silver and the other bronze, rose up from the ground as the sheer force of the water unleashed by Sandy swelled the ground."
[i.dailymail.co.uk image 636x400]

And today is Halloween, that seems a little scary.
[2.bp.blogspot.com image 400x267]


Are those graves like down in New Orleans where they are basically right at ground level or above it? I mean the displacement of 6 feet of dirt and not touch any other graves seems odd if it isn't.
 
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