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(Russia Today)   Police officer uses taser on 10 year old boy to "show [him] what happens to people who do not listen to the police", because the boy stated that he didn't want to clean the officer's squad car during career day   (rt.com) divider line 231
    More: Asinine, Boys/Girls State, patrol cars, police officers, warrantless wiretapping, psychological trauma, Taser  
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16319 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Oct 2012 at 11:05 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-31 09:11:40 AM

Ficoce: When all we ask of the police is to drive around and answer calls that need a report or write traffic tickets we don't have any problems. It's when we use fuzzy logic to think that because cops are good at doing a job that helps society means they would also be good at social work and adolescent development - that's when we get cool stories like this.


I can only imagine the damage if our fork truck drivers had militarized vehicles and equipment available to them when things don't go as scheduled.
 
2012-10-31 09:19:27 AM
They were just talking about some case going to the supreme court about legality of bringing drug sniffing dogs to everyone's front door. These judges should really take in to account the fact that these are the kinds of people that implement the interpretation of laws.
 
2012-10-31 09:24:25 AM

Rincewind53: never point a gun at someone you don't intend to shoot.


This.

But I think the cretins in law enforcement also need to remember that a Taser is a gun not a penis length compensator.
 
2012-10-31 09:37:57 AM

TheGogmagog: Ficoce: When all we ask of the police is to drive around and answer calls that need a report or write traffic tickets we don't have any problems. It's when we use fuzzy logic to think that because cops are good at doing a job that helps society means they would also be good at social work and adolescent development - that's when we get cool stories like this.

I can only imagine the damage if our fork truck drivers had militarized vehicles and equipment available to them when things don't go as scheduled.


I think you're getting it. You don't see too many cops quit the force to become first grade teachers or campaign for government office - it's not in their nature to compromise. If it was they would be crappy cops. I bet if we interviewed all the kids that witnessed the tazing, one or two of them would probably think, "That was cool!" One kid's pain and suffering might have resulted in launching a few more toward a successful career in law enforcement.

Just because we are equal doesn't mean we are the same. The world takes all kinds.
 
2012-10-31 09:40:59 AM
Man, I can't imagiine what the cop would do to the kid if he picked his nose in front of him.
 
2012-10-31 09:42:56 AM

Ficoce: One kid's pain and suffering might have resulted in launching a few more toward a successful career in law enforcement.

Or crime.
 
2012-10-31 09:43:44 AM

fnordfocus: Rincewind53:

Plus that's a farking lame excuse. If a civilian were to claim "I didn't know it was loaded" he would be in jail with no bail. This Officer won't even get paid leave.


When I had my interview with the BATFE officer back in June (for the FFL) she was explaining how inventory and ammunition must be stored separately and all weapons had to be cleared before allowing a customer to handle them.

"I didn't know it was loaded." is basically an admission of guilt.

I know it is only marginally relevant to the story. Just reinforcing how lame an excuse it is.
 
2012-10-31 09:55:03 AM
5 Pages and no Officer Farva references!
Fark, I am disappoint.

i.ytimg.com

/I WANT A GODDAMN LITER-A-COLA!
//burger punk
 
2012-10-31 10:39:49 AM
I think cattle prods are cheaper.
 
2012-10-31 11:03:45 AM

fnordfocus: SanjiSasuke: So old news is old news. ("...the May 4 Career Day")

You can't just sue a state. First, you make a claim for damages. They can pay it, tell you to fark off, or allow you to sue. That takes time. In this case 6-7 months seems reasonable.


Yeah, but the headline isn't on the suing process, it treats the event like it just happened.

/irrelevant if this wasn't reported here before.
 
2012-10-31 11:08:12 AM

indylaw: Double jeopardy applies only to criminal prosecutions, and only when it goes to trial. Discipline by a police chief is not a criminal prosecution and doesn't involve a trial. It's an administrative hearing. Something few people know, but probably should: double jeopardy applies only when a criminal case has gotten to jury selection. You can be arrested and incarcerated for a year without bail (or unable to make bail) and the prosecutor could decide to withdraw the case, setting you free. As long as that case hasn't gone to trial (starting at jury selection), the prosecutor can have you locked up again to stand trial because jeopardy has not attached.


Garrity v. New Jersey says that evidence used in an administrative hearing can't be used in a criminal trial. I guess it's not technically double jeopardy, but the Department will make sure all evidence has been introduced into the administrative hearing so there's nothing left the DA can use for criminal charges.

It's incredibly common for Officers to face administrative charges for things like DWI or domestic violence that would land a civilian in jail, and then they're effectively immune from criminal charges.
 
2012-10-31 11:14:29 AM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: basemetal: That's assault and battery with a dangerous weapon even if it was an accident. Was the officer charged?

Apparantly so, and the kid was grounded.

This sounds more like an accident than anything. Bust his ass for being an idiot, maybe straight up fire him, but no jail time. Maybe some probation amf community service.


Yeah, except this happened right after the kid refused to clean his car. Sorry, I'm not entirely sure this was an accident. There's a lot of trigger-happy, power-hungry assholes in blue. I need some more solid evidence than just the police department's word that this was a demonstration and not just someone pulling out what they thought was an unloaded tazer to threaten a kid.

/Call me a cynic, but I read too much Fark to think otherwise.
 
2012-10-31 11:19:32 AM

Relatively Obscure: Anyone have this from a solid source?


The mere fact you can't be bothered to look up public records to find the truth is pretty telling of your mental capacity.
 
2012-10-31 11:31:16 AM
 
2012-10-31 11:48:33 AM

evaned: "Assume Device is Loaded. Always assume that a TASER device is loaded. Do not point a TASER device at anything you do not intend to hit."
-Taser X26C operating manual

That rule is inviolable. The cop should be fired.


"A gun is ALWAYS loaded." I'd imagine the same should go for Tasers.

Per the Smoking Gun version of this article, he'd removed the cartridge for an earlier group of kids, but what I suspect is just good training and lots of practice, he remounted the cartridge before holstering it, without even realizing he'd done so.

I can see being the big police officer entertaining kids, and pointing a "safe" taser at the kid's foot or something briefly.. I can see it.. I'll never agree that it's "ok" but I can imagine making that same mistake myself (obviously before reading an article like this). If I were in this position after being alerted that it's possible I reloaded it without remembering I'd done it, I don't think I'd point anything at the child stronger than a small padded stick, because, seriously, all bets are off.

I considered suggesting that a dummy taser would be ok to point, but then I realized that you'd pointing what the kid perceives to be a weapon, right AT them.. that can't be pleasant under any circumstances, and considering it would only be done to take a perverse pleasure in scaring them for a moment, totally not something worth doing.
 
2012-10-31 11:51:26 AM
This cop is damned lucky I'm not in charge of adjudicating his case. Because I would simply label him as having made terroristic threats, then sent him off to one of our torture facilities to get tazed in the nuts regularly, and to be otherwise tortured to death, with no hope of due process.

What's good for the goose...
 
2012-10-31 12:08:19 PM
I'm surprised more stories like this don't end with: "the boy's father is now wanted for questioning in the beating death of the officer."

Like the guy who's kid was abducted and raped by his karate instructor. The rapist was being brought through the airport, the father turned from pretending to be on a phone call and blew the guy away.

Not that it's right of course. But it's understandable. I don't see where that anger is. If I were the principal I would have tried to hand the cop an ass kicking. I can't imagine the boy's teachers weren't pissed off beyond belief. What educator, or decent person, could stand to see a child harmed and not be incredibly angered to the point of doing something irrational?

I would be surprised if the officer hadn't had to move out of the area. If I were in New Mexico I'd better be hearing from the police how much of a shiatbird this guy was or they'd be getting a load of grief all day every day.

This is the kind of thing a community shouldn't just let go.
 
2012-10-31 12:28:19 PM
I hope those kids TP'ed the crap out of the cops house, soaped his windows and all that other Mischeif Night stuff that kids do.
 
2012-10-31 01:43:27 PM

khyberkitsune: Relatively Obscure: Anyone have this from a solid source?

The mere fact you can't be bothered to look up public records to find the truth is pretty telling of your mental capacity.


Not really, no. I'll try to drink away the notion that you might think poorly of me, though, so I can sleep tonight.
 
2012-10-31 01:54:35 PM

Relatively Obscure: solid source


The smoking gun has it:

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/file/10-year-old-tasered
 
2012-10-31 01:57:23 PM

rnatalie: Relatively Obscure: solid source

The smoking gun has it:

http://www.thesmokinggun.com/file/10-year-old-tasered


Saw that, but thanks. That one was much better.
 
2012-10-31 01:59:23 PM

RTOGUY: What I want to know is if the kid now cleans cars after he is asked the first time.


www.huntingdogcentral.com

Rarely have to tell a bird dog twice.
 
2012-10-31 02:52:31 PM

fnordfocus: Garrity v. New Jersey says that evidence used in an administrative hearing can't be used in a criminal trial. I guess it's not technically double jeopardy, but the Department will make sure all evidence has been introduced into the administrative hearing so there's nothing left the DA can use for criminal charges.


It's not at all double jeopardy. And that's not at ALL what Garrity says. I have no idea how you came by that idea. A Garrity Warning is similar to a Miranda warning in administrative proceedings. It basically says that you are under no obligation to answer questions during the department investigation, but that your silence can be used against you in determining administrative action. Your silence cannot be used against you in criminal proceedings.

Let's say that a police officer is accused of raping someone and a complaint is filed with IAD. The cop, during the IAD investigation, may choose to remain silent (he has a right to remain silent). That silence can be used against him to determine whether to terminate his employment, but it cannot be used at a criminal trial. However, if the cop talks, that testimony can be used at both the administrative and criminal level, assuming there's no problem with the rule against hearsay.

Where do you get this shiat?
 
2012-10-31 03:13:15 PM

Pointy Tail of Satan: [upload.wikimedia.org image 74x44]


At 50 kHz, on dry skin, we're looking at a relative permittivity of about εr=1127. That's an ouch.
 
2012-10-31 03:50:04 PM

Isildur: jake_lex: GAT_00: Who the fark around here keeps reading Russian news and submitting it?

The cop is enough of an asshat in the real story without RT's exaggeration and misrepresentation. I mean, pointing a taser at a kid, even as a "joke", is an incredibly asshole-ish thing to do.


Granted. But RT's exaggeration and misrepresentation here is, put simply, a deliberate lie. Given this sort of lack of ethical standards, it would be nice if people would avoid submitting from RT. (not to mention Pravda and its "MIRACLE HEALING BOY DISCOVERED, VISITED BY ALIENS!" crap)

For anyone not aware, "RT" is short for "Russia Today" and it is a Kremlin-funded TV/internet network -- something they don't deny, but instead try to muddy waters about, by comparing themselves to entities like the BBC or the Corporation for Public broadcasting. (Never mind the fact that the latter pair are based in countries where journalists can freely criticize their own governments in harsh terms without serious fear of sharing the fate of these guys. ) But if you like distorted regurgitations of stories broken by other news sites, misrepresented (as in this case) for the purpose of showing how horrible places like the U.S. and U.K. are, RT is great.

 
2012-10-31 03:58:32 PM
This is a civil case.

Meaning there is/was no criminal case.

Christ.
 
2012-10-31 05:09:38 PM

Rockstone: Not all cops are bad. In my county two of them were fired for excessive force at a traffic stop. It gives me new hope in humanity.

/ The ones at my University are REALLY REALLY nice too.


Wat?

t.qkme.me

Your point. I missed it.
 
2012-10-31 05:11:06 PM

R.A.Danny: Seriously, we're safer with fewer cops.


As one of Fark's resident authoritarian conservatives, let me agree with you wholeheartedly.
 
2012-10-31 05:58:20 PM

indylaw: Let's say that a police officer is accused of raping someone and a complaint is filed with IAD. The cop, during the IAD investigation, may choose to remain silent (he has a right to remain silent). That silence can be used against him to determine whether to terminate his employment, but it cannot be used at a criminal trial. However, if the cop talks, that testimony can be used at both the administrative and criminal level, assuming there's no problem with the rule against hearsay.


From http://www.njlawman.com/garrity.htm: Any statements made after invoking Garrity, may only be used for department investigation purposes and not for criminal prosecution purposes.

So if you face administrative charges and confess, what evidence could possibly be admitted in a criminal trial?

I'd also point out that it is incredibly common for Officers to face administrative charges instead of criminal charges for offenses like DWI that would net a civilian jail time. I assume this is related.
 
2012-10-31 08:52:41 PM
Aaaaaaand that is why you can't trust worthless pig-monsters with non-lethal weapons. If there isn't the consequence of someone dying, they will use them irresponsibly (kinda like how they tase people for "non-compliance"). I hope this officer is killed in a fire whilst his screaming family watches.
 
2012-11-02 03:58:25 PM

AbortionsForAll: Aaaaaaand that is why you can't trust worthless pig-monsters with non-lethal weapons


Actually I trust them more with a baton than a tazer. It's lot harder to (legally or psychologically) justify beating someone with a stick than simply pointing a piece of plastic at them and pushing a button.
 
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