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(Chicago Sun-Times)   Incentive-based education now moves on to parents, who are being bribed with $25 gift cards to pick up their children's report cards   (suntimes.com) divider line 83
    More: Asinine, gift card, CPS  
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3511 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Oct 2012 at 9:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-30 10:38:47 PM
Fark this. Incentive based education? Here's MY incentive: I want my kids to do well, so they aren't flipping burgers when they're in their 30's. Just had a parent/teacher conference today at 2pm. Wife and I both took time off from work to be there, because we give a shiat.
 
2012-10-30 10:40:08 PM
strange my report cards were always sent home with me to the best of my recollection.

/since i am a farker now it may not be as good as it once was.
 
2012-10-30 10:43:32 PM
1) School, at some point, gives out a calendar detailing when report cards are issued.

2) Child brings report card home.

3) If the child does not bring the report card home at the designated date, beat him mercilessly.

4) Profit.
 
2012-10-30 10:48:57 PM
Welcome to Obama's America
 
2012-10-30 10:54:03 PM

tudorgurl: Gwendolyn: I see this all the time at work. People complain at how uninvolved parents are and then they have conferences at like 10 am. People freaking work. Have the things at like 7pm and you might get a different response.

So teachers shouldn't have lives? Or families? Really?

Jesus, dude. Seriously. It's your farking kid. They should be important enough to take an hour off of work to talk to the teacher. Or, if that's not an option, do a phone conference. Barring that, send an email.

It's not rocket surgery.


I do family therapy with kids in the juvenile justice system. One evening a week doesn't kill me and one every 9 weeks for this wouldn't kill teachers.
 
2012-10-30 10:56:47 PM

GoodyearPimp: gajacks: The father of one of my students never missed one of his son's basketball games (which is a good thing) but would never make it to a single parent-teacher conference. We even offered to meet him right before or after a game, but he would skip out on those too.

Sports is important. What's anyone ever done with academics? The Lakers ain't payin millions to straight-A students.


And there's our incentive problem in a nutshell.
 
2012-10-30 10:59:09 PM

Gwendolyn: I see this all the time at work. People complain at how uninvolved parents are and then they have conferences at like 10 am. People freaking work. Have the things at like 7pm and you might get a different response.


Thats a cop-out.

I was a student ... I had parent - teacher conferences... all took place during the day.

My mom or dad made sure one of them took off work to make it. Why?

Because they cared.

 
2012-10-30 10:59:58 PM

over_and_done: GoodyearPimp: gajacks: The father of one of my students never missed one of his son's basketball games (which is a good thing) but would never make it to a single parent-teacher conference. We even offered to meet him right before or after a game, but he would skip out on those too.

Sports is important. What's anyone ever done with academics? The Lakers ain't payin millions to straight-A students.

And there's our incentive problem in a nutshell.


yup

 
2012-10-30 11:07:39 PM

Gwendolyn: tudorgurl: Gwendolyn: I see this all the time at work. People complain at how uninvolved parents are and then they have conferences at like 10 am. People freaking work. Have the things at like 7pm and you might get a different response.

So teachers shouldn't have lives? Or families? Really?

Jesus, dude. Seriously. It's your farking kid. They should be important enough to take an hour off of work to talk to the teacher. Or, if that's not an option, do a phone conference. Barring that, send an email.

It's not rocket surgery.

I do family therapy with kids in the juvenile justice system. One evening a week doesn't kill me and one every 9 weeks for this wouldn't kill teachers.


It depends on the teacher. In my school district, you can not have a parent-teacher conference without an administrator present (hooray lawsuits). The average conference lasts at least 15 minutes IF the parent is on time. Multiply that by 200-300 students. Unless you can fit 50+ hours into one evening, I think you are in for a bit more than an evening (unpayed, mind you) every 9 weeks.
 
2012-10-30 11:24:12 PM

vegasj: My mom or dad made sure one of them took off work to make it. Why?

Because they cared could.

 
2012-10-30 11:25:52 PM
I've only one question, does it work? All of the people in this thread getting off on feeling superior to the working poor, be ashamed. All of the people who talk about how things were or ought to be, wake up to reality. Try it, if it works do it more, if it doesn't try something else.
 
2012-10-30 11:45:19 PM

omnimancer28: Gwendolyn: tudorgurl: Gwendolyn: I see this all the time at work. People complain at how uninvolved parents are and then they have conferences at like 10 am. People freaking work. Have the things at like 7pm and you might get a different response.

So teachers shouldn't have lives? Or families? Really?

Jesus, dude. Seriously. It's your farking kid. They should be important enough to take an hour off of work to talk to the teacher. Or, if that's not an option, do a phone conference. Barring that, send an email.

It's not rocket surgery.

I do family therapy with kids in the juvenile justice system. One evening a week doesn't kill me and one every 9 weeks for this wouldn't kill teachers.

It depends on the teacher. In my school district, you can not have a parent-teacher conference without an administrator present (hooray lawsuits). The average conference lasts at least 15 minutes IF the parent is on time. Multiply that by 200-300 students. Unless you can fit 50+ hours into one evening, I think you are in for a bit more than an evening (unpayed, mind you) every 9 weeks.


The article is for elementary students. My son has 24 kids in his second grade class. That's 6ish hours if everyone comes.
 
2012-10-30 11:56:39 PM
Chicago hours for report card pick-up/conferences have generally been 12:00pm to 6:00pm.

Hardly bank hours, but this should be expanded in my opinion. In the suburban district my wife teaches in they're scheduled two days and for one night the hours are 6:00pm to 9:00pm.
 
2012-10-30 11:57:00 PM
You want parents to show up.... do what we did..... hold on to the report cards until Friday night and have an open house with free dinner for parents and their kids. Give all the teachers the morning off so they can stay late and meet with parents until 9pm. Of course, we were a charter school so we could play fast and loose with CPS regulations but it worked.... we always had better then 80% of our parents come in.

Poor parents work and are stressed for time.... have flexible hours and save them time by proving a good meal and they'll come.
 
2012-10-30 11:57:27 PM
I spent a year volunteering in the South Side of Chicago. Terrible neighborhood. Even though it was only a couple blocks from the train station, on multiple occasions I had gangs of elementary school/middle school kids taunt me and throw glass bottles at me as I walked back to the train after my shift while yelling racial slurs (I'm white).

The program I worked for paid kids to show up and record videos and music for productions that they gave to younger inner-city kids during weekend presentations. I volunteered because these were the things I loved to do as a kid and I never imagined I could get paid for it.

None of the kids gave a shiat. They were too cool and acted put out that they were being "forced" to show up and stop texting for two hours so that they could learn some new skills while being paid. I tried my best to make it interesting and show them how they could use these skills to make money doing what they liked, but they were more interested in socializing.

So, if it takes $25 to get a parent to show up to a conference, how much will it cost to make them actually invest time in what their kids are doing and inspire them to do better?
 
2012-10-30 11:59:18 PM
How shiatty of a parent are you to not even pick up your child's report card? If the parent show that they care about education why should the kid? Less competition for my children I guess...
 
2012-10-31 12:11:43 AM

Gwendolyn: omnimancer28: Gwendolyn: tudorgurl: Gwendolyn: I see this all the time at work. People complain at how uninvolved parents are and then they have conferences at like 10 am. People freaking work. Have the things at like 7pm and you might get a different response.

So teachers shouldn't have lives? Or families? Really?

Jesus, dude. Seriously. It's your farking kid. They should be important enough to take an hour off of work to talk to the teacher. Or, if that's not an option, do a phone conference. Barring that, send an email.

It's not rocket surgery.

I do family therapy with kids in the juvenile justice system. One evening a week doesn't kill me and one every 9 weeks for this wouldn't kill teachers.

It depends on the teacher. In my school district, you can not have a parent-teacher conference without an administrator present (hooray lawsuits). The average conference lasts at least 15 minutes IF the parent is on time. Multiply that by 200-300 students. Unless you can fit 50+ hours into one evening, I think you are in for a bit more than an evening (unpayed, mind you) every 9 weeks.

The article is for elementary students. My son has 24 kids in his second grade class. That's 6ish hours if everyone comes.


The article says the announcement was made at an elementary school. The program includes 70 schools including some high schools.
 
2012-10-31 12:14:10 AM
Damn.

I wish it were, "If you don't pick up your kid's report card, we put it in an orphanage because you are a bad parent, and incapable of raising a child."
 
2012-10-31 12:14:46 AM

gajacks: Teachers don't have 10 am meetings. That's when they are teaching. They have them in the evening when classes are over.


Not always. Our school wil have these half-days where kids attend just in the morning, and parent-teacher conferences are scheduled in the afternoon.

Oh, and you can't bring your kid along to the parent-teacher conference.
 
2012-10-31 12:23:54 AM
Handing out $25 gift cards to pick up report cards? This idea should be marked as *puts on sunglasses* Needs Improvement YEEAAAAAAAH!
 
2012-10-31 12:30:28 AM

vegasj:


My mom or dad made sure one of them took off work to make it.


I wonder if your parents had single co-workers who whined on the internet about how they have to pick up all the slack when parents take time off work to attend to some child-related matter and how blatantly unfair that is?
 
2012-10-31 12:35:09 AM
But ... but ... if we just increase school budgets over and over and over we'll get really smart kids and involved parents.

It's really a matter of enough money going into Union coffers.

Don't you know that's what prevents involved parenting? Not enough Union money?
 
2012-10-31 01:44:30 AM

Your Average Witty Fark User: Fark this. Incentive based education? Here's MY incentive: I want my kids to do well, so they aren't flipping burgers when they're in their 30's. Just had a parent/teacher conference today at 2pm. Wife and I both took time off from work to be there, because we give a shiat.


I have two daughters even though they aren't mine (fiancee's children from a previous relationship). I have them interested in doing really well in school to get a good education in college. I took the backasswards way of doing meh in school, joining the military and then getting a free college education. They are still young (one in K, the other in 2nd grade) but they love to learn and try to imitate me when I'm doing homework. Hopefully I can keep them interested in school and so far that is a promising outlook for me. They relate to me more than their real dad because I actually take an interest in the work they do and I take them places to teach them about anything they want to learn. Their dad? When he has the girls for the weekend he keeps them cooped up in their room while he plays video games all day. His day job is working fast food.

/I'd love to take a road trip to Chicago and visit the Field Museum, the girls REALLY want to see a dinosaur in person.
 
2012-10-31 02:55:38 AM
eugenics and sterilization is the answer.
 
2012-10-31 07:05:29 AM
My son goes to private school so I have to pay a $25 dollar deposit to pick up his grades.
 
2012-10-31 07:20:33 AM

Gyrfalcon: Maybe someday, we'll drop this idea that every kid has to go to college and become SOMETHING, and maybe it will become socially acceptable for people to be satisfied being auto mechanics or grocery store managers all their lives, if that's what they're happy doing and it provides a steady paycheck.


I don't think we've lost the ideal that it's ok to work at those jobs, it's that those jobs don't let you live a life of pride anymore.

A good day's work is a good day's work -- but not if the cheque won't feed you or your family.
 
2012-10-31 07:55:16 AM
Why do these conversations always turn into a eugenics/sterlization love-fest?
 
2012-10-31 08:47:19 AM

Tenatra:

I'd love to take a road trip to Chicago and visit the Field Museum, the girls REALLY want to see a dinosaur in person.



Ummmm...you do realize it's just some bones, not a Jurrasic Park thing..right?
 
2012-10-31 10:12:35 AM

Akessamenos: Why do these conversations always turn into a eugenics/sterlization love-fest?


Because a lot of the time the excuse boils down to "I'm too busy/tired to take an interest in the life that I helped create. Let someone else do that." These people tend to be, but are not always, at the lower end of the economic spectrum and usually already receiving several types of public assistance.Since we don't want them to become an even bigger burden on society than they already are, eugenics/sterilization get brought up as some sort of solution to prevent the problem from getting worse. Not saying it's right or wrong, just that's what tends to happen.

/slippery slope is slippery
//but not always wrong
///ymmv
 
2012-10-31 10:18:45 AM

Akessamenos: Why do these conversations always turn into a eugenics/sterlization love-fest?


You know who else managed to inject their love of eugenics/sterilization into most conversations? George Bernard Shaw, the playwright. Now you've learned something in this education thread.
 
2012-10-31 10:36:53 AM

JohnCarter: Ummmm...you do realize it's just some bones, not a Jurrasic Park thing..right?


Yes I know, I went there a few times when I was younger. The closest thing we have to dinosaurs around here is T-Rex Cafe.
 
2012-10-31 01:27:57 PM

Akessamenos: Why do these conversations always turn into a eugenics/sterlization love-fest?


Why do people keep trying to equate eugenics and sterilization?
 
2012-10-31 02:43:53 PM
Many studies in behavioural economics show this type of incentive doesn't work. Actually it can cause an increase in non-compliance. In one study, a day-care center started fining parents for being late - this caused an increase in late parents.

The basic idea is that if you institute a fine, people will feel justified in not complying as long as they pay the fine. So the $10 "penalty" for being late to get the kids is seen by the parents as a $10 "fee" to pay the center for the extended baby-sitting (or - in the case of this article - paying a $25 "fee" - which they're glad to do - to not have to get the report cards).

Those that pay the "fee" feel totally justified in their actions and see no punitive measure towards them.
 
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