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(LA Times)   Parent's complaint gets Stephen King book removed from high school. But sometimes they come back   (latimes.com) divider line 119
    More: Followup, high schools, school committee, school library, parents, complaints  
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11829 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Oct 2012 at 2:48 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-28 09:34:05 PM

Mikey1969: Teresaol31: I insist that my fifth grader read primarily from the banned book list: this semester he's re-reading Harry Potter for report purposes because I know the teacher has likely read those, over the summer he read Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn, Puddin'head Wilson (yes, we like Mark Twain around here) and To Kill a Mockingbird, and he just finished "The Hobbit," but we're saving LOTR for next semester. My parenting philosophy has always been to encourage the kids to read that which others say they should not read, because those are the books that actually TEACH you something about real life. Yes, I have made him a literary geek, but guess what? He reads at a 10th grade level while the other kids in his class are struggling with the generic "age appropriate" crap that the school approves of. (He's also read all of the Xantha books by Piers Anthony, but nobody but those are simply to kill time between the more serious stuff he's read.) I think that King's writing is rather vapid for the most part, but honestly getting a kid over the age of 12 to read AT ALL for pleasure is damn near impossible these days, so I'd rather them read King, Koontz, or any of the other modern thriller writers than not to read at all.

I can't get my stepsons to read ANYTHING. Thank God my daughter is here, she is the most inquisitive 4 year old I've ever run into, and already sits down with her books and reads them to her stuffed animals, making up stories based on the pictures. There is still hope. :-) She already made my wife buy us a telescope for looking at "the stars and moon and the planets".


Part of the key is letting the kids see YOU turning off the boob tube and the computer and reading, not because you have to, but as an activity. Habitually reading to them or with them from an early age helps too. Both of mine had the Dr. Seuss books memorized by the time they were three and neither ever had to be taught "how to read" they just KNEW how to read. The other thing is to find something they like. This second kid is easy, he likes sci-fi, fantasy, etc. The older one HATES fiction and I for the life of me do not know why, but you can give the kid an obscure historical manual on early technology developments or a biography of someone he admires like Marconi or Tesla, and he'll read that. That is probably why he's going into engineering but the younger one wants to be a teacher.
 
2012-10-28 09:39:10 PM

Mikey1969: whidbey: Mikey1969: I was so taken by it that I read it in something like 4 days

That's true of a lot of his stuff. At least it starts out pretty damn inspired, and I can't put it down.

I have no problem with the length of his stuff. As a matter of fact, I like his attention to detail and backstory enough that I miss it when other writers don't add it. Unfortunately, his endings do seem to be the weakest part of his stuff. It's ok though, because when I take the whole, it is still worth it.


It's got to be very similar to the problems some directors have when they make long, detailed movies. They're apt to lose focus and run out of steam to where the ending doesn't have the punch the exposition had...
 
2012-10-28 09:40:02 PM

Mikey1969: K3rmy: I am still mad at that travesty of a movie "The Running Man". A faithful adaptation probably could not get made today due to the ending.

Yeah, some people think this movie was amazing. I thought if it didn't have the story to go on, it would have been great, but it was a disappointment after the story. Same with Total Recall, sure it was fun, but it doesn't have the 'something' that Philip K Dick gave it, instead it turned into a campy, silly movie rather than a sci-fi thriller.

Oh well...


King's Running Man was a far more prescient vision of the near future than the Arnold movie with its American Gladiators style reality TV. King's was more like a twisted version of The Amazing Race. It's too bad the movie went the way it did; it doesn't really bear a lot in common with the book at all. Very disappointing.
 
2012-10-28 09:40:49 PM

Mikey1969: Uchiha_Cycliste: I can think of one story, just one that shouldn't be in schools... RAGE.
(maybe)

Yeah, not a censorship kind of guy, but this one is kind of bad form to have in schools after all of the school shootings and stuff. Maybe it's something that King has to officially say that he would appreciate not having this in school libraries and see if the libraries comply. Kind of a voluntary censorship thing. I'd rather not have this censorship bullshiat though.


I'd rather not have it either, but I fear the risks outweigh the benefits. Albeit unlikely, I think the possibility exists for an unstable kid to pick up the book there, read it and get ideas. Or possibly to see RAGE as condoning what he's already thinking or pushing him in that direction. god, even as I type it it sounds flimsy, but it's honestly why I'm okay with censoring that one. I don't really think (m)any other reasons are legit. Oh, you're offended... don't read it dipshiat. But if it could actually bring harm upon the student body, that's bad.
 
2012-10-28 09:43:03 PM

Mikey1969: Uchiha_Cycliste: As far as I knew, I thought RAGE only existed in "the Bachman Books" Did it ever stand alone? Do the Bachman books now just have one less story? That was an amazing collection adn I would LOVE to see The Long Walk made into a movie, as long as they stuck to the ending religiously.

They were all originally published separately. I agree that seeing The Long Walk as a movie would be great IF they could make it work, it might not work, and as a result, might just be a slow moving mess. If the right person directed it, the right person wrote the screenplay, and it was edited correctly, you could have an awesome movie. One of my all time favorite stories by anyone, that's for sure.


I think it could be a great movie. The potential is there, it just has to be rather faithful and use the exact ending. I'm not sure who would be a good director, but I know lots who wouldn't .
 
2012-10-28 10:13:14 PM

Teresaol31: Mikey1969: Teresaol31: I insist that my fifth grader read primarily from the banned book list: this semester he's re-reading Harry Potter for report purposes because I know the teacher has likely read those, over the summer he read Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn, Puddin'head Wilson (yes, we like Mark Twain around here) and To Kill a Mockingbird, and he just finished "The Hobbit," but we're saving LOTR for next semester. My parenting philosophy has always been to encourage the kids to read that which others say they should not read, because those are the books that actually TEACH you something about real life. Yes, I have made him a literary geek, but guess what? He reads at a 10th grade level while the other kids in his class are struggling with the generic "age appropriate" crap that the school approves of. (He's also read all of the Xantha books by Piers Anthony, but nobody but those are simply to kill time between the more serious stuff he's read.) I think that King's writing is rather vapid for the most part, but honestly getting a kid over the age of 12 to read AT ALL for pleasure is damn near impossible these days, so I'd rather them read King, Koontz, or any of the other modern thriller writers than not to read at all.

I can't get my stepsons to read ANYTHING. Thank God my daughter is here, she is the most inquisitive 4 year old I've ever run into, and already sits down with her books and reads them to her stuffed animals, making up stories based on the pictures. There is still hope. :-) She already made my wife buy us a telescope for looking at "the stars and moon and the planets".

Part of the key is letting the kids see YOU turning off the boob tube and the computer and reading, not because you have to, but as an activity. Habitually reading to them or with them from an early age helps too. Both of mine had the Dr. Seuss books memorized by the time they were three and neither ever had to be taught "how to read" they just KNEW how to read. The other thing is to find something they like. This second kid is easy, he likes sci-fi, fantasy, etc. The older one HATES fiction and I for the life of me do not know why, but you can give the kid an obscure historical manual on early technology developments or a biography of someone he admires like Marconi or Tesla, and he'll read that. That is probably why he's going into engineering but the younger one wants to be a teacher.


Lol, seeing me read? Not an issue. I own around 550 books and have about 150 more on my Nook. When we make our yearly trip to AZ, I take them to the best used bookstore I've ever seen. We've tried everything, either books I recommend, books that are popular with kids their age and books specifically in their interest zone. It all falls flat.

I spend at least 2-3 hours a day reading, but it's not wearing off on them.

Like I said though, my daughter shows promise. She was adding books to her pile of toys whne she was 6 or 9 months old... :-)
 
2012-10-28 10:21:24 PM

whidbey: Mikey1969: whidbey: Mikey1969: I was so taken by it that I read it in something like 4 days

That's true of a lot of his stuff. At least it starts out pretty damn inspired, and I can't put it down.

I have no problem with the length of his stuff. As a matter of fact, I like his attention to detail and backstory enough that I miss it when other writers don't add it. Unfortunately, his endings do seem to be the weakest part of his stuff. It's ok though, because when I take the whole, it is still worth it.

It's got to be very similar to the problems some directors have when they make long, detailed movies. They're apt to lose focus and run out of steam to where the ending doesn't have the punch the exposition had...


Yeah, it's harder than people think to keep the pacing good in a film. I can see King doing the same thing with his books. At least he's not Anne Rice, she seems to get 3/4 of the way through, realize that she's short, and then add 60 pages that have nothing to do with the story, and then suddenly veer back on track without any warning. King's stuff might run long, but at least it's mostly on track with the story.
 
2012-10-28 10:48:20 PM

eraser8: Krymson Tyde: 'Two of its stories have been made into movies: "The Shawshank Redemption" and "Stand by Me."'
Apt Pupil?

More to the point: this is stupid.

I'm probably the one person in North America who disliked The Shawshank Redemption. But, I really did. I thought it was crap. The film, I mean; I haven't read the story.


I enjoy most all of Stephen King's books quite a bit, but I have never seen one of his stories translate well to a movie. The movies are usually not even worth watching.
 
2012-10-28 10:55:40 PM
I bet it was a girl that complained.

*clicks link*

I'm like psychic and stuff.
 
2012-10-29 12:18:17 AM

kemosabe: I bet it was a girl that complained.

*clicks link*

I'm like psychic and stuff.


You know how I know you suck at reading?

FTFA: a rape scene in one story led to a complaint from a parent at Rocklin High School.

A school committee voted to pull the book from the library shelves, with only 17-year-old senior Amanda Wong dissenting. The other members of the committee, all adults, reportedly didn't even read the book through before voting.

Amanda complained to the school board and got results. The superintendent ordered the book placed back on the shelves while a districtwide committee considers the matter. That committee should recommend keeping the book.

*this is your confused dog face*
 
2012-10-29 12:43:12 AM
A prof. told me once that if someone tells you that you shouldn't read a book, run don't walk to the library and read because it will probally change your life.

I modified that into: Anyone who attempts to stifle the free exchange of ideas should be, at least, distrusted.
 
2012-10-29 01:19:02 AM

kemosabe: I bet it was a girl that complained.

*clicks link*

I'm like psychicsexist and stuff.

 
2012-10-29 02:19:48 AM
Back in the day my freshman English class was required to read a Stephen King book (of our own choice) to do a report. I did The Shining (first King book I read) and got hooked, then proceeded to read The Stand a few dozen times. That culminated with a botched attempt at burning down the school as Trashcan Man and a bit of jail time. Yeah, I'm *that* lame.
 
2012-10-29 07:26:23 AM

blueyd1: In 6th grade, we were learning about the Holocaust and my teacher showed us the short film of The Lottery as a lesson about groupthink. I was simultaneously freaked out and fascinated.

I went home and told my mom about the film and she instantly gave me the story to read, which we then stayed up way past my bedtime to discuss.

Two days later, our teacher issued a tearful apology to the class for showing us the film. Apparently a bunch of parents biatched and my teacher was almost fired. That's when I knew my mom was awesome.

/and yes, she owns every Bachman and King book
//she's still awesome


I am giving The Bachman Books (yes with Rage) to my 14 year old to read. I told her, "At home. Do NOT take it to school. I don't need a call from the proncipal FBI when it's spotted in your locker." Sad that we're to that place as a society, but we are.
 
2012-10-29 07:28:17 AM

Teresaol31: Mikey1969: Teresaol31: I insist that my fifth grader read primarily from the banned book list: this semester he's re-reading Harry Potter for report purposes because I know the teacher has likely read those, over the summer he read Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn, Puddin'head Wilson (yes, we like Mark Twain around here) and To Kill a Mockingbird, and he just finished "The Hobbit," but we're saving LOTR for next semester. My parenting philosophy has always been to encourage the kids to read that which others say they should not read, because those are the books that actually TEACH you something about real life. Yes, I have made him a literary geek, but guess what? He reads at a 10th grade level while the other kids in his class are struggling with the generic "age appropriate" crap that the school approves of. (He's also read all of the Xantha books by Piers Anthony, but nobody but those are simply to kill time between the more serious stuff he's read.) I think that King's writing is rather vapid for the most part, but honestly getting a kid over the age of 12 to read AT ALL for pleasure is damn near impossible these days, so I'd rather them read King, Koontz, or any of the other modern thriller writers than not to read at all.

I can't get my stepsons to read ANYTHING. Thank God my daughter is here, she is the most inquisitive 4 year old I've ever run into, and already sits down with her books and reads them to her stuffed animals, making up stories based on the pictures. There is still hope. :-) She already made my wife buy us a telescope for looking at "the stars and moon and the planets".

Part of the key is letting the kids see YOU turning off the boob tube and the computer and reading, not because you have to, but as an activity. Habitually reading to them or with them from an early age helps too. Both of mine had the Dr. Seuss books memorized by the time they were three and neither ever had to be taught "how to read" they just KNEW how to read. The other thing is ...


Good advice. Also try an e reader. Merge reading with technology - they might be more interested.
 
2012-10-29 08:04:06 AM
I guess none of those parents have read Tess of the d'Urbervilles either. I mean its about date rape and teenage pregnancy. Filth!
 
2012-10-29 02:47:41 PM
Confabulat

King let Rage go out of print after a copy was found in some school shooter's locker. It's the only Stephen King book that's not being published anymore.
Don't believe everything you hear $K say......
The Bachman Books : Four Early Novels by Richard Bachman (Rage / The Long Walk / Roadwork / The Running Man)


He made that claim back 'round columbine. It's still untrue.
 
2012-10-29 10:34:49 PM
"The Carneal incident was enough for me. I asked my publisher to take the damned thing out of print. They concurred." -Steven King
img443.imageshack.us
 
2012-10-29 11:12:00 PM

OnlyM3: Don't believe everything you hear $K say......


That edition hasn't been published since the late 90s. You do understand what "out of print" means, right? You can still buy copies because books don't magically disappear. But notice the price of a "new" one ($64.00). That's because you're buying a mint copy of a book that hasn't been published in over a decade.

Thanks for playing, maybe you learned something new today.
 
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