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(Daily Mail)   Researchers discover why children think they are invisible when they hide their eyes - and it's not what you think   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 89
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21264 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Oct 2012 at 8:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-28 11:26:49 AM
Could also be a bullshiat study and the children dont really believe they are invisible, they are just playing along with the game for status quo.

Although when the children were asked to explain how they were made invisible by simply hiding their eyes, many knew that their bodies remained visible, suggesting a childhood distinction between their physical bodies and the 'self' they connect to their eyes.
 
2012-10-28 11:37:33 AM

BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?


Oh, I would say that it is very useful indeed. We don't perceive the world around us as it is, objectively speaking. The human mind interprets the information we receive from our senses to create a subjective mental map. That is the only world we consciously experience and the only one we know.

By studying this, we can learn more about the process of interpretation and gain a greater insight into the process by which reality is mapped by our consciousness, and thus learn more not only about how we perceive, but what unknowns might be outside of our own mental constructs.
 
2012-10-28 11:54:31 AM
i can be invisible - ronnie dio james rip rip rip
 
2012-10-28 11:55:22 AM

namegoeshere: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Headso: I wonder if it is some sort of evolutionary thing, when you are a small child crouching down and hiding your eyes is pretty much the only defense you have against some prey animal spotting you.

I've known people who were in Special Forces and Light Infantry units. A common tactic, apparently, is to never look directly at a target, because the target will somehow sense your gaze. Ever been in a crowd, felt uncomfortable, or something tickling the back of your neck, and turned around to see someone starring at you? Yeah, that kind of creepy.

I've played around with this while bored and waiting in a group of strangers, or in a crowd. Look near a person, and they don't notice you. Look at the person, and they will look up at you every time.

Fortunately, I am a harmless-looking small female so I haven't gotten myself into too much trouble with this trick. YMMV if you are a big scary looking guy. ; )


Yep. This tells me there is something else rather than the normal 5 senses going on. Some kind of pseudo-telepathic sensory feedback loop, maybe? Tough to test, validate and quantify something like that, cause of the difficulty of setting up double-blind tests.
 
2012-10-28 12:02:47 PM
My youngest sister believed that when she squinted her eyes at night wile looking at street lights the apparent rays of light that spread out from the light came out of her eyes and that we should be able to see the rays coming from her. It didn't help that my father called her "bright eyes".
 
2012-10-28 12:10:49 PM
The way small kids view the world gives support to ideology.

This is all you really need to know about religion.
 
2012-10-28 12:12:53 PM

gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.


There were two in a row.
 
2012-10-28 12:20:42 PM
25.media.tumblr.com

Don't look away.

Don't turn your back.

Don't blink.

Don't even blink.
 
2012-10-28 12:32:32 PM
I LEARNED IT FROM WATCHING YOU!!!
fondoo.net
 
2012-10-28 12:38:52 PM

DamnYankees: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

Hah. You were dumb.


No, just a REALLY ugly family

/I keed
 
2012-10-28 01:33:32 PM

SwiftFox: gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.

Shh. We're hiding from it.

/Is "Shh" a word?
//How about Tsk


Hmm.

/I'll have to get back to you on that one.
 
2012-10-28 01:33:38 PM
It can't possibly be because adults typically pretend to go along with it and pretend they've disappeared.

My almost-2-year-old plays this game. If I say, "Where's James?" He immediately slaps his hands over his eyes and starts giggling. Slowly he peels them back and peeks at me, and I exclaim "THERE he is!!" And he quickly hides again.

The other day he came up to me and yelled, "SAY WHAR JAMES!" and mr teeny immediately said "SAY WHERE'S ERNIE." Goddamn that movie.
 
2012-10-28 01:41:44 PM
Well, um. I guess anything passes for science these days.
 
2012-10-28 02:00:57 PM

Gordon Bennett: BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?

Oh, I would say that it is very useful indeed. We don't perceive the world around us as it is, objectively speaking. The human mind interprets the information we receive from our senses to create a subjective mental map. That is the only world we consciously experience and the only one we know.

By studying this, we can learn more about the process of interpretation and gain a greater insight into the process by which reality is mapped by our consciousness, and thus learn more not only about how we perceive, but what unknowns might be outside of our own mental constructs.


Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.
 
2012-10-28 02:28:00 PM

LrdPhoenix: Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.


Whenever some pretentious twatwaffle says that in front of me, I offer a kick in the nads to help resolve any uncertainty.

/Would you like a kick in the nads to test your hypothesis that there is no external reality?
 
2012-10-28 02:29:56 PM

samiam00: Shameless but relevant self-promotion:

Alex the Seal - Peekaboo


Shameless but relevant addition to Ignore.
 
2012-10-28 03:25:20 PM

namegoeshere: I've played around with this while bored and waiting in a group of strangers, or in a crowd. Look near a person, and they don't notice you. Look at the person, and they will look up at you every time.

Fortunately, I am a harmless-looking small female so I haven't gotten myself into too much trouble with this trick. YMMV if you are a big scary looking guy. ; )


Careful there... down that path lies drinks, dinner, or even the possibility of *gasp!* DANCING.

/better look away and cover your eyes just to be safe
 
2012-10-28 03:25:48 PM
DNRTFA but gonna take an educated guess:

Because they haven't developed their sense of "object permanance" yet.
 
2012-10-28 03:43:06 PM
 
2012-10-28 03:52:23 PM
These researchers are making this too complicated. It's really very simple. Children's brains have not matured to the point that they can understand that there are points of view other than their own. They think if they can't see something, then no one can see it. They think if they can't see you, then you can't see them.
 
2012-10-28 04:45:37 PM
That article was almost unreadable. Ambiguous antecedents are ambiguous.
 
2012-10-28 05:47:06 PM
Because kids are self-centered little shiats who hasn't developed the cognitive ability to see from another person's perspectives?

/covered in first year psy
 
2012-10-28 06:02:58 PM

LDM90: I don't think I've ever met a child who thought that. WTF? Of course, I didn't RTFA so that could be my problem right there.


You weren't paying attention. At about age 2 or three--whenever it is kids think it's hilarious to play peekaboo--you'll see them "hiding" by crouching down in a corner and covering their eyes. As long as their eyes are covered, they think they're invisible. If the adult in their lives play along, they'll continue to think they're invisible.

It doesn't last very long, because most kids aren't dumb; and also because usually their older brothers or sisters let them know right away they're not hiding; but it's pretty cute for a few minutes.
 
2012-10-28 08:16:49 PM
That's why very young children are so noisy - they think if nobody looks at them every few minutes, they'll disappear.
 
2012-10-28 08:18:17 PM

AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?


Very young kids are far from stupid. Most stupidity is learned - it is instilled by the education system, religion and other narrow minded adults.

Young children have a far higher capacity to learn than adults do, so in that way they are more intelligent than adults. Intelligence is not what you know, but your capacity to learn.
 
2012-10-28 08:33:29 PM

Alonjar: Could also be a bullshiat study and the children dont really believe they are invisible, they are just playing along with the game for status quo.

That's a very real possibility. The study didn't control for that.
 
2012-10-28 08:48:05 PM

kg2095: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

Very young kids are far from stupid. Most stupidity is learned - it is instilled by the education system, religion and other narrow minded adults.

Young children have a far higher capacity to learn than adults do, so in that way they are more intelligent than adults. Intelligence is not what you know, but your capacity to learn.


Hey wet blanket, let's stop with the actual conversation, and stick with the usual fark fare. I rtfa and actually believe that the author is not correctly interpeting the results conveyed by the reseachers. Of course kids have a greater than average capacity to learn, and of course a lot of the differences are from cultural etc influences. However, as the headline stands, so does my post. Now everybody get back to fun stuff, it is Sunday evening and the world series is on. Back to real important discussions like this Monday. -kg2095 - I actually agree with you, just couldn't pass up the oportunity to troll.
 
2012-10-28 09:29:59 PM

BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?


It's usually because a university requires tenured professors to publish research to keep their position which has resulted in an insane amount of stupid studies
 
2012-10-28 10:01:59 PM

Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.


If you don't mind me asking, what happened?
 
2012-10-28 10:16:59 PM
So basically the headline result of their study is based on a sample size of 7 4-year-olds. That's some awesome statistics right there.
 
2012-10-28 11:01:19 PM

LovingTeacher: My youngest sister believed that when she squinted her eyes at night wile looking at street lights the apparent rays of light that spread out from the light came out of her eyes and that we should be able to see the rays coming from her. It didn't help that my father called her "bright eyes".


Did your sister get a little bit tired of listening to the sound of her tears every now and then, or get a little bit nervous that the best of all the years have gone by?
 
2012-10-28 11:04:40 PM

Andulamb: These researchers are making this too complicated. It's really very simple. Children's brains have not matured to the point that they can understand that there are points of view other than their own. They think if they can't see something, then no one can see it. They think if they can't see you, then you can't see them.


To put it in technical terms, they have no theory of mind.
 
2012-10-28 11:21:07 PM

BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?


Imagine the headline were this instead, then: "MAD SCIENTISTS USE CHILD TEST SUBJECTS TO UNLOCK SECRETS OF SLENDERMAN'S TERRIFYING NATURE; 30 of 37 Children Eliminated in Preliminary Trials"
 
2012-10-29 12:03:32 AM
Researchers seem prone to misinterpreting utterances of toddlers. They put masks on kids and said "can I see you?" Kid said "no." Cuz they're behind a mask, right? And the researcher decides that this means the kid thinks they're invisible.
 
2012-10-29 08:21:14 AM
"... - and it's not what you think"
Submitter has a bright future in writing checkout stand magazine headlines. Other endlessly repurpose-able classics:
"... - what they DON'T want you to know!"
"... - and how it could be HARMING your KIDS!"
"... - the SHOCKING details REVEALED at LAST!"
"... - and 25 OTHER dipshiats NOT WORTH the ATTENTION you LAVISH ON them!"

/ok, maybe not precisely the last one
 
2012-10-29 01:04:49 PM

flahorsegirl: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

If you don't mind me asking, what happened?


The teacher had to talk me down and convince me that we all saw through our own eyes. I was pretty terrified.
 
2012-10-29 02:35:21 PM

Mangoose: flahorsegirl: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

If you don't mind me asking, what happened?

The teacher had to talk me down and convince me that we all saw through our own eyes. I was pretty terrified.


Do you have any other clever ways to scare children? It's, uh, for a friend.
 
2012-10-30 01:08:43 PM

demaL-demaL-yeH: LrdPhoenix: Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.

Whenever some pretentious twatwaffle says that in front of me, I offer a kick in the nads to help resolve any uncertainty.

/Would you like a kick in the nads to test your hypothesis that there is no external reality?


Wouldn't change nor test anything. Pain is yet another construct of the mind. In fact, it's literally impossible to test because everything is always filtered through the mind, so you have to be capable of removing the mind to test whether or not reality exists without it, which is impossible because you would require a mind to interpret any results, which is why it requires making an assumption to get around it. There are many things that would not exist without a mind to interpret them though, from physical things such as sound and color (both literally wholly constructs of the mind), to concepts like emotions.
 
2012-10-30 06:02:21 PM

LrdPhoenix: demaL-demaL-yeH: LrdPhoenix: Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.

Whenever some pretentious twatwaffle says that in front of me, I offer a kick in the nads to help resolve any uncertainty.

/Would you like a kick in the nads to test your hypothesis that there is no external reality?

Wouldn't change nor test anything. Pain is yet another construct of the mind. In fact, it's literally impossible to test because everything is always filtered through the mind, so you have to be capable of removing the mind to test whether or not reality exists without it, which is impossible because you would require a mind to interpret any results, which is why it requires making an assumption to get around it. There are many things that would not exist without a mind to interpret them though, from physical things such as sound and color (both literally wholly constructs of the mind), to concepts like emotions.


I'll take that reply as a "Yes, please kick me in the nads. Use your combat boots. Then waterboard me."

/Starting to suspect that you are using Fark as your personal erotica site.
 
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