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(Daily Mail)   Researchers discover why children think they are invisible when they hide their eyes - and it's not what you think   (dailymail.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Interesting, sense of self, Cambridge University, Michelin, FDNY, Marco Rubio  
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21293 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Oct 2012 at 8:46 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-27 10:34:03 PM  
Is it because kids are stupid?
 
2012-10-27 10:45:38 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?


No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.
 
2012-10-27 10:47:18 PM  
I can't see you, so don't pretend you're really there
 
2012-10-27 10:47:24 PM  
The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.
 
2012-10-27 10:50:09 PM  
I don't remember ever thinking I was invisible.
 
2012-10-27 10:52:38 PM  

BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.


Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?
 
2012-10-27 10:59:26 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.

Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?


It depends on whether they want to be or not
 
2012-10-27 11:01:31 PM  

Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.


Hah. You were dumb.
 
2012-10-27 11:07:12 PM  
Masters not maysers. Looks like I should close my eyes and become invisible.
 
2012-10-27 11:11:58 PM  
Bogeymen are sentient creatures who are often considered undead though they technically are not, since they haven't actually died. Bogeymen take shapes to scare people, especially kids. Some bogeymen are more comfortable under a bed, behind a door, or in a cellar. One of the few ways to subdue a bogeyman is to put a blanket on his head. The theory goes that everyone knows Bogeymen disappear if you put the blankets over your head, and so by putting a blanket over a Bogeyman's head his belief in his own existence is impaired. Apparently, light blue blankets are most effective but no-one seems to know why ---- Terry Prachett
 
2012-10-27 11:17:47 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: AmbassadorBooze: BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.

Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?

It depends on whether they want to be or not


WHOOSH! :-)
 
2012-10-28 12:00:40 AM  
My dog thinks I cant see her when her head is behind the couch. She weighs 100lbs and her body sticks out really far.
 
2012-10-28 12:54:51 AM  

ToxicMunkee: I don't remember ever thinking I was invisible.


Same here.
 
2012-10-28 02:03:16 AM  
i199.photobucket.com 

"Hah! Child's play. "
 
2012-10-28 07:41:31 AM  
i.chzbgr.com
 
2012-10-28 07:43:37 AM  
i.chzbgr.com

/equal time for dog lovers
 
2012-10-28 08:46:31 AM  

DamnYankees: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

Hah. You were dumb.


Correction. I am dumb
 
2012-10-28 08:49:43 AM  
I don't think I've ever met a child who thought that. WTF? Of course, I didn't RTFA so that could be my problem right there.
 
2012-10-28 08:55:40 AM  
I have friends who have worked overseas, some as missionaries, some in the Peace Corps. They all say that "peek-a-boo" is a universal game among children, regardless of native language.

/where's my towel?
 
2012-10-28 08:58:20 AM  
Yeah, we had a kitty with us for 13 years and I'd swear that that cat was thinkin' that if he wasn't looking at us ... we couldn't see him.
 
2012-10-28 09:04:41 AM  
dead people have eyes and they can't see you. maybe scientists just like to take the fun out of everything.
 
2012-10-28 09:04:59 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: AmbassadorBooze: BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.

Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?

It depends on whether they want to be or not


You've got it all backwards. They are, in fact, invisible. But at that age, precisely because their brains are less developed and not fully "educated," they are capable of projecting an alter reality into other people's brains. You, loving and doting parent, see your little child playing games because that is exactly the image they can project into your skull. Add in the temporal perturbations and they can fool you into thinking the eyes were covered for seconds, rather than the hours that actually pass.

I cannot go into what the little ones do during these escapades of freedom. It's too disturbing for FARK and you really don't want to know.
 
2012-10-28 09:09:52 AM  
Shameless but relevant self-promotion:

Alex the Seal - Peekaboo
 
2012-10-28 09:11:34 AM  
.. Did everyone not already know this?

/confused
 
2012-10-28 09:11:51 AM  
Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.
 
2012-10-28 09:16:44 AM  
The kids just have how invisibility works backwards is all. They need to talk to this guy: 
i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-28 09:19:47 AM  
I remember as a very young kid I thought people could know what I was thinking about if they looked in my eyes.

So I'd look away if I was lying or thinking about something I shouldn't be

oblivious to the fact that this was a major tell for lying or hiding something.

/childhood fail
 
2012-10-28 09:20:14 AM  
Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?
 
2012-10-28 09:20:28 AM  
deadhomersociety.files.wordpress.com

"That's why you're still kids, cause you're stupid!"

deadhomersociety.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-10-28 09:20:35 AM  

gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.


Shh. We're hiding from it.

/Is "Shh" a word?
//How about Tsk
 
2012-10-28 09:35:01 AM  
Interesting idea. Have read similar things before.

This is another drop in the bucket that shows eye contact is very important to humans. So important that it is one of the first things humans use to identify self awareness of anything. This goes beyond projections of ourselves and other humans. Think people who put eyes on boats, shields, buildings, trees, etc. Think children's drawings too. Tell them to make something alive and it will almost always have eyes and typically a face. One myth I remember is that eyes on boats kept bad luck and evil at bay or made the ship scary to real and unreal threats. I say a boat covered in spikes or other features would be more effective. However it could be that the eyes made the ship come alive to those who built and used the vessel. Eyes aren't the window to the soul they are the projection and perceived idea of a soul.

I have read that the people who made those big statues on Easter Island considered it complete when the eyes were installed and at that point the statue was alive.

Two co workers are terrified of rodents. They freak out more if it "makes eye contact" and thus invoking my WTF response.
"It looked at you? so what." My mind can't see why this would make the mouse more of a threat. Of course I have killed more mice than most people have seen.
Never mind that you really can't see where a mouse is looking and they have shiat vision anyways. However this seems to make the mouse "more real" with perceived eye contact. It gives the mouse a motive in their minds. This also occurs in animals without traditional eyes. In that case our mind will give them eyes and almost always 2 human like eyes.

The other end of the question is what of the blind? It would be interesting to see data from people who have gone blind and those who were born blind.  Mainly people who have intact brains but damaged or malformed eyes.
 
2012-10-28 09:42:26 AM  

BarkingUnicorn: MaudlinMutantMollusk: AmbassadorBooze: BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.

Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?

It depends on whether they want to be or not

WHOOSH! :-)


Ah the breeze of several passing zen masters affects you as well.
 
2012-10-28 09:42:49 AM  

Unobtanium: tow


Always

gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.


FTHHGTTG: "A towel, [The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy] says, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have. Partly it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapors; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine so redly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a miniraft down the slow heavy River Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand-combat; wrap it round your head to ward off noxious fumes or avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (such a mind-boggingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can't see it, it can't see you); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough."

/should have realized this would have been mentioned before me...but wtf..posted anyway
 
2012-10-28 09:43:37 AM  

gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.


So did I. And I found it!
 
2012-10-28 10:04:52 AM  

optikeye: Bogeymen are sentient creatures who are often considered undead though they technically are not, since they haven't actually died. Bogeymen take shapes to scare people, especially kids. Some bogeymen are more comfortable under a bed, behind a door, or in a cellar. One of the few ways to subdue a bogeyman is to put a blanket on his head. The theory goes that everyone knows Bogeymen disappear if you put the blankets over your head, and so by putting a blanket over a Bogeyman's head his belief in his own existence is impaired. Apparently, light blue blankets are most effective but no-one seems to know why ---- Terry Prachett


Came in not even hoping to read this.
You made my evening.
And you are now favorited.
 
2012-10-28 10:07:10 AM  
I wonder if it is some sort of evolutionary thing, when you are a small child crouching down and hiding your eyes is pretty much the only defense you have against some prey animal spotting you.
 
2012-10-28 10:10:53 AM  

edmo: MaudlinMutantMollusk: AmbassadorBooze: BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.

Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?

It depends on whether they want to be or not

You've got it all backwards. They are, in fact, invisible. But at that age, precisely because their brains are less developed and not fully "educated," they are capable of projecting an alter reality into other people's brains. You, loving and doting parent, see your little child playing games because that is exactly the image they can project into your skull. Add in the temporal perturbations and they can fool you into thinking the eyes were covered for seconds, rather than the hours that actually pass.

I cannot go into what the little ones do during these escapades of freedom. It's too disturbing for FARK and you really don't want to know.


No, you've got it all wrong. Everybody is invisible to some degree, except perhaps babies. You see, people start out fully visible, and grow more invisible as they get older. The only thing is, your visual acumen grows along with it coontil a certain age, of course). That is why you can see your own peers properly, why children can be so annoyingly present, and why older people turn grey. What you're witnessing when you see a child cover their eyes and pretending to be invisible, is that precise point at which it has learned this truth, but doesn't realize yet what the cause is. It mixes up the growth of its visual acumen (which is nullified by closing or covering ones eyes) with the fact that everybody around it turns more invisible every day.
 
2012-10-28 10:20:43 AM  
If they're prevented from staring directly at the Daily Mail logo, very young children can be temporarily fooled into thinking they're looking at an article that one can confidently expect to correctly characterize scientific study results.
 
2012-10-28 10:22:13 AM  
I came in here to talk about the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal.

I wonder if anyone's mentioned it yet...
 
2012-10-28 10:22:20 AM  
Maybe children are more in tune with quantum mechanics. Observation or lack of it is vital there.
 
2012-10-28 10:24:39 AM  
I found a way where I can actually be invisible if I hide my eyes. Works even when not hiding my eyes. Only works on women though.
 
2012-10-28 10:27:34 AM  
Trippin' Balls!
i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2012-10-28 10:30:37 AM  

SilentStrider: ToxicMunkee: I don't remember ever thinking I was invisible.

Same here.


Neither did I.
But I was a bright kid. I suspect this is a stupid-kid thing.

/never believed in Santa Claus either.
 
2012-10-28 10:42:52 AM  
Is it that they think they are invisible, or that they identify self as face, and the body is superfluous to the question of identity? I wonder did the researchers ask, can I see your toes? Can I see your tummy?

FTFA: Although when the children were asked to explain how they were made invisible by simply hiding their eyes, many knew that their bodies remained visible, suggesting a childhood distinction between their physical bodies and the 'self' they connect to their eyes.


So it would seem that, no, they do not think they "go invisible". They simply identify the self as the face. If the face is covered, no, you can't see "them."
 
2012-10-28 10:45:36 AM  

Frederick: My dog thinks I cant see her when her head is behind the couch. She weighs 100lbs and her body sticks out really far.


Back during our wedding reception (first wife, in her home) her cat decided to jump up on a chair and sample the food on the table. But she was tricky. She sat on the chair and stretched one front paw out as far as she could onto the tablecloth. Stretch.... claws out... puuuullllllll slowly back. Stretch.... claws out.....puuuullllllll slowly back. Each time the food moved closer to the cat by maybe 3 or 4 inches. Gradually the entire room became aware of this, and conversation stopped while everyone stared bemusedly at this little 7 pound black and white cat. The cat, meanwhile, stared directly back at the crowd, ignoring her own paw, which continued to methodically and slowly reach out to reel in more tablecloth. The message was obvious: "If I can't see my own paw, then neither can you."
 
2012-10-28 10:58:35 AM  

kd8our: Interesting idea. Have read similar things before.

This is another drop in the bucket that shows eye contact is very important to humans. So important that it is one of the first things humans use to identify self awareness of anything. This goes beyond projections of ourselves and other humans. Think people who put eyes on boats, shields, buildings, trees, etc. Think children's drawings too. Tell them to make something alive and it will almost always have eyes and typically a face. One myth I remember is that eyes on boats kept bad luck and evil at bay or made the ship scary to real and unreal threats. I say a boat covered in spikes or other features would be more effective. However it could be that the eyes made the ship come alive to those who built and used the vessel. Eyes aren't the window to the soul they are the projection and perceived idea of a soul.

I have read that the people who made those big statues on Easter Island considered it complete when the eyes were installed and at that point the statue was alive.

Two co workers are terrified of rodents. They freak out more if it "makes eye contact" and thus invoking my WTF response.
"It looked at you? so what." My mind can't see why this would make the mouse more of a threat. Of course I have killed more mice than most people have seen.
Never mind that you really can't see where a mouse is looking and they have shiat vision anyways. However this seems to make the mouse "more real" with perceived eye contact. It gives the mouse a motive in their minds. This also occurs in animals without traditional eyes. In that case our mind will give them eyes and almost always 2 human like eyes.

The other end of the question is what of the blind? It would be interesting to see data from people who have gone blind and those who were born blind.  Mainly people who have intact brains but damaged or malformed eyes.


In my day I've had vets put down several aged or severely injured cats and dogs. I've always been there with them when the vet does the injection. There is always a "spark" that "goes away" from the eyes at the time of death. I've always tried to rationalize it as "relaxed eye muscles" or whatnot. Every vet I've mentioned it to has also noticed it. Some of them agree: just muscles relaxing. Most seem to think it's some sort of "presence" that departs the body. They say that because they don't see the same change when the animal is anesthetized, and claim that the same muscles would be involved.
 
2012-10-28 11:00:48 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: AmbassadorBooze: BarkingUnicorn: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

No, it's because "the self" is all in your head. Ask any Zen master, or 3 year-old.

Do Zen masyers believe they are invisible when they close their eyes?

It depends on whether they want to be or not



Only if they make a sound.
 
2012-10-28 11:03:24 AM  

Headso: I wonder if it is some sort of evolutionary thing, when you are a small child crouching down and hiding your eyes is pretty much the only defense you have against some prey animal spotting you.


I've known people who were in Special Forces and Light Infantry units. A common tactic, apparently, is to never look directly at a target, because the target will somehow sense your gaze. Ever been in a crowd, felt uncomfortable, or something tickling the back of your neck, and turned around to see someone starring at you? Yeah, that kind of creepy.
 
2012-10-28 11:14:15 AM  

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Headso: I wonder if it is some sort of evolutionary thing, when you are a small child crouching down and hiding your eyes is pretty much the only defense you have against some prey animal spotting you.

I've known people who were in Special Forces and Light Infantry units. A common tactic, apparently, is to never look directly at a target, because the target will somehow sense your gaze. Ever been in a crowd, felt uncomfortable, or something tickling the back of your neck, and turned around to see someone starring at you? Yeah, that kind of creepy.


I've played around with this while bored and waiting in a group of strangers, or in a crowd. Look near a person, and they don't notice you. Look at the person, and they will look up at you every time.

Fortunately, I am a harmless-looking small female so I haven't gotten myself into too much trouble with this trick. YMMV if you are a big scary looking guy. ; )
 
2012-10-28 11:25:44 AM  

biglot: Yeah, we had a kitty with us for 13 years and I'd swear that that cat was thinkin' that if he wasn't looking at us ... we couldn't see him.


No, if he wasn't looking at you, you were too insignificant for him to care whether you could see him or not.
 
2012-10-28 11:26:49 AM  
Could also be a bullshiat study and the children dont really believe they are invisible, they are just playing along with the game for status quo.

Although when the children were asked to explain how they were made invisible by simply hiding their eyes, many knew that their bodies remained visible, suggesting a childhood distinction between their physical bodies and the 'self' they connect to their eyes.
 
2012-10-28 11:37:33 AM  

BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?


Oh, I would say that it is very useful indeed. We don't perceive the world around us as it is, objectively speaking. The human mind interprets the information we receive from our senses to create a subjective mental map. That is the only world we consciously experience and the only one we know.

By studying this, we can learn more about the process of interpretation and gain a greater insight into the process by which reality is mapped by our consciousness, and thus learn more not only about how we perceive, but what unknowns might be outside of our own mental constructs.
 
2012-10-28 11:54:31 AM  
i can be invisible - ronnie dio james rip rip rip
 
2012-10-28 11:55:22 AM  

namegoeshere: Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Headso: I wonder if it is some sort of evolutionary thing, when you are a small child crouching down and hiding your eyes is pretty much the only defense you have against some prey animal spotting you.

I've known people who were in Special Forces and Light Infantry units. A common tactic, apparently, is to never look directly at a target, because the target will somehow sense your gaze. Ever been in a crowd, felt uncomfortable, or something tickling the back of your neck, and turned around to see someone starring at you? Yeah, that kind of creepy.

I've played around with this while bored and waiting in a group of strangers, or in a crowd. Look near a person, and they don't notice you. Look at the person, and they will look up at you every time.

Fortunately, I am a harmless-looking small female so I haven't gotten myself into too much trouble with this trick. YMMV if you are a big scary looking guy. ; )


Yep. This tells me there is something else rather than the normal 5 senses going on. Some kind of pseudo-telepathic sensory feedback loop, maybe? Tough to test, validate and quantify something like that, cause of the difficulty of setting up double-blind tests.
 
2012-10-28 12:02:47 PM  
My youngest sister believed that when she squinted her eyes at night wile looking at street lights the apparent rays of light that spread out from the light came out of her eyes and that we should be able to see the rays coming from her. It didn't help that my father called her "bright eyes".
 
2012-10-28 12:10:49 PM  
The way small kids view the world gives support to ideology.

This is all you really need to know about religion.
 
2012-10-28 12:12:53 PM  

gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.


There were two in a row.
 
2012-10-28 12:20:42 PM  
25.media.tumblr.com

Don't look away.

Don't turn your back.

Don't blink.

Don't even blink.
 
2012-10-28 12:32:32 PM  
I LEARNED IT FROM WATCHING YOU!!!
fondoo.net
 
2012-10-28 12:38:52 PM  

DamnYankees: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

Hah. You were dumb.


No, just a REALLY ugly family

/I keed
 
2012-10-28 01:33:32 PM  

SwiftFox: gerrychampoux: Came here expecting a reference to the Bugblatter Beast of Traal.

Shh. We're hiding from it.

/Is "Shh" a word?
//How about Tsk


Hmm.

/I'll have to get back to you on that one.
 
2012-10-28 01:33:38 PM  
It can't possibly be because adults typically pretend to go along with it and pretend they've disappeared.

My almost-2-year-old plays this game. If I say, "Where's James?" He immediately slaps his hands over his eyes and starts giggling. Slowly he peels them back and peeks at me, and I exclaim "THERE he is!!" And he quickly hides again.

The other day he came up to me and yelled, "SAY WHAR JAMES!" and mr teeny immediately said "SAY WHERE'S ERNIE." Goddamn that movie.
 
2012-10-28 01:41:44 PM  
Well, um. I guess anything passes for science these days.
 
2012-10-28 02:00:57 PM  

Gordon Bennett: BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?

Oh, I would say that it is very useful indeed. We don't perceive the world around us as it is, objectively speaking. The human mind interprets the information we receive from our senses to create a subjective mental map. That is the only world we consciously experience and the only one we know.

By studying this, we can learn more about the process of interpretation and gain a greater insight into the process by which reality is mapped by our consciousness, and thus learn more not only about how we perceive, but what unknowns might be outside of our own mental constructs.


Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.
 
2012-10-28 02:28:00 PM  

LrdPhoenix: Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.


Whenever some pretentious twatwaffle says that in front of me, I offer a kick in the nads to help resolve any uncertainty.

/Would you like a kick in the nads to test your hypothesis that there is no external reality?
 
2012-10-28 02:29:56 PM  

samiam00: Shameless but relevant self-promotion:

Alex the Seal - Peekaboo


Shameless but relevant addition to Ignore.
 
2012-10-28 03:25:20 PM  

namegoeshere: I've played around with this while bored and waiting in a group of strangers, or in a crowd. Look near a person, and they don't notice you. Look at the person, and they will look up at you every time.

Fortunately, I am a harmless-looking small female so I haven't gotten myself into too much trouble with this trick. YMMV if you are a big scary looking guy. ; )


Careful there... down that path lies drinks, dinner, or even the possibility of *gasp!* DANCING.

/better look away and cover your eyes just to be safe
 
2012-10-28 03:25:48 PM  
DNRTFA but gonna take an educated guess:

Because they haven't developed their sense of "object permanance" yet.
 
2012-10-28 03:43:06 PM  
 
2012-10-28 03:52:23 PM  
These researchers are making this too complicated. It's really very simple. Children's brains have not matured to the point that they can understand that there are points of view other than their own. They think if they can't see something, then no one can see it. They think if they can't see you, then you can't see them.
 
2012-10-28 04:45:37 PM  
That article was almost unreadable. Ambiguous antecedents are ambiguous.
 
2012-10-28 05:47:06 PM  
Because kids are self-centered little shiats who hasn't developed the cognitive ability to see from another person's perspectives?

/covered in first year psy
 
2012-10-28 06:02:58 PM  

LDM90: I don't think I've ever met a child who thought that. WTF? Of course, I didn't RTFA so that could be my problem right there.


You weren't paying attention. At about age 2 or three--whenever it is kids think it's hilarious to play peekaboo--you'll see them "hiding" by crouching down in a corner and covering their eyes. As long as their eyes are covered, they think they're invisible. If the adult in their lives play along, they'll continue to think they're invisible.

It doesn't last very long, because most kids aren't dumb; and also because usually their older brothers or sisters let them know right away they're not hiding; but it's pretty cute for a few minutes.
 
2012-10-28 08:16:49 PM  
That's why very young children are so noisy - they think if nobody looks at them every few minutes, they'll disappear.
 
2012-10-28 08:18:17 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?


Very young kids are far from stupid. Most stupidity is learned - it is instilled by the education system, religion and other narrow minded adults.

Young children have a far higher capacity to learn than adults do, so in that way they are more intelligent than adults. Intelligence is not what you know, but your capacity to learn.
 
2012-10-28 08:33:29 PM  

Alonjar: Could also be a bullshiat study and the children dont really believe they are invisible, they are just playing along with the game for status quo.

That's a very real possibility. The study didn't control for that.
 
2012-10-28 08:48:05 PM  

kg2095: AmbassadorBooze: Is it because kids are stupid?

Very young kids are far from stupid. Most stupidity is learned - it is instilled by the education system, religion and other narrow minded adults.

Young children have a far higher capacity to learn than adults do, so in that way they are more intelligent than adults. Intelligence is not what you know, but your capacity to learn.


Hey wet blanket, let's stop with the actual conversation, and stick with the usual fark fare. I rtfa and actually believe that the author is not correctly interpeting the results conveyed by the reseachers. Of course kids have a greater than average capacity to learn, and of course a lot of the differences are from cultural etc influences. However, as the headline stands, so does my post. Now everybody get back to fun stuff, it is Sunday evening and the world series is on. Back to real important discussions like this Monday. -kg2095 - I actually agree with you, just couldn't pass up the oportunity to troll.
 
2012-10-28 09:29:59 PM  

BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?


It's usually because a university requires tenured professors to publish research to keep their position which has resulted in an insane amount of stupid studies
 
2012-10-28 10:01:59 PM  

Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.


If you don't mind me asking, what happened?
 
2012-10-28 10:16:59 PM  
So basically the headline result of their study is based on a sample size of 7 4-year-olds. That's some awesome statistics right there.
 
2012-10-28 11:01:19 PM  

LovingTeacher: My youngest sister believed that when she squinted her eyes at night wile looking at street lights the apparent rays of light that spread out from the light came out of her eyes and that we should be able to see the rays coming from her. It didn't help that my father called her "bright eyes".


Did your sister get a little bit tired of listening to the sound of her tears every now and then, or get a little bit nervous that the best of all the years have gone by?
 
2012-10-28 11:04:40 PM  

Andulamb: These researchers are making this too complicated. It's really very simple. Children's brains have not matured to the point that they can understand that there are points of view other than their own. They think if they can't see something, then no one can see it. They think if they can't see you, then you can't see them.


To put it in technical terms, they have no theory of mind.
 
2012-10-28 11:21:07 PM  

BizarreMan: Somebody actually got a research grant to study kids and peek-a-boo? I'm all for science doesn't always have to have a value assigned to it. But come on, really?


Imagine the headline were this instead, then: "MAD SCIENTISTS USE CHILD TEST SUBJECTS TO UNLOCK SECRETS OF SLENDERMAN'S TERRIFYING NATURE; 30 of 37 Children Eliminated in Preliminary Trials"
 
2012-10-29 12:03:32 AM  
Researchers seem prone to misinterpreting utterances of toddlers. They put masks on kids and said "can I see you?" Kid said "no." Cuz they're behind a mask, right? And the researcher decides that this means the kid thinks they're invisible.
 
2012-10-29 08:21:14 AM  
"... - and it's not what you think"
Submitter has a bright future in writing checkout stand magazine headlines. Other endlessly repurpose-able classics:
"... - what they DON'T want you to know!"
"... - and how it could be HARMING your KIDS!"
"... - the SHOCKING details REVEALED at LAST!"
"... - and 25 OTHER dipshiats NOT WORTH the ATTENTION you LAVISH ON them!"

/ok, maybe not precisely the last one
 
2012-10-29 01:04:49 PM  

flahorsegirl: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

If you don't mind me asking, what happened?


The teacher had to talk me down and convince me that we all saw through our own eyes. I was pretty terrified.
 
2012-10-29 02:35:21 PM  

Mangoose: flahorsegirl: Mangoose: The first real memory I have centered around me shutting my eyes as tightly as I could because I didn't want everyone else seeing what I see. I was terrified.

If you don't mind me asking, what happened?

The teacher had to talk me down and convince me that we all saw through our own eyes. I was pretty terrified.


Do you have any other clever ways to scare children? It's, uh, for a friend.
 
2012-10-30 01:08:43 PM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: LrdPhoenix: Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.

Whenever some pretentious twatwaffle says that in front of me, I offer a kick in the nads to help resolve any uncertainty.

/Would you like a kick in the nads to test your hypothesis that there is no external reality?


Wouldn't change nor test anything. Pain is yet another construct of the mind. In fact, it's literally impossible to test because everything is always filtered through the mind, so you have to be capable of removing the mind to test whether or not reality exists without it, which is impossible because you would require a mind to interpret any results, which is why it requires making an assumption to get around it. There are many things that would not exist without a mind to interpret them though, from physical things such as sound and color (both literally wholly constructs of the mind), to concepts like emotions.
 
2012-10-30 06:02:21 PM  

LrdPhoenix: demaL-demaL-yeH: LrdPhoenix: Thus, the foundation of one of the biggest problems in philosophy and all things which spring from it, including science. You can never really know if reality is real or if it's just a useful construct of the mind. Only way around it to make reality concrete is simply to make the hard assumption that what seems real is real enough to be called reality, regardless of the fact that said assumption may be completely wrong and the only reality one can be certain of is their own mind.

Whenever some pretentious twatwaffle says that in front of me, I offer a kick in the nads to help resolve any uncertainty.

/Would you like a kick in the nads to test your hypothesis that there is no external reality?

Wouldn't change nor test anything. Pain is yet another construct of the mind. In fact, it's literally impossible to test because everything is always filtered through the mind, so you have to be capable of removing the mind to test whether or not reality exists without it, which is impossible because you would require a mind to interpret any results, which is why it requires making an assumption to get around it. There are many things that would not exist without a mind to interpret them though, from physical things such as sound and color (both literally wholly constructs of the mind), to concepts like emotions.


I'll take that reply as a "Yes, please kick me in the nads. Use your combat boots. Then waterboard me."

/Starting to suspect that you are using Fark as your personal erotica site.
 
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