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(YouTube)   Behold the power of a CNC machine. Subby still trying to learn how to whittle   (youtube.com) divider line 67
    More: Interesting, CNC Machine  
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6555 clicks; posted to Video » on 27 Oct 2012 at 6:14 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-27 01:40:54 PM
Approves:

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-27 01:50:34 PM
Not as good as their early stuff.
 
2012-10-27 04:04:29 PM
is it gonna make you sweat?
 
2012-10-27 04:08:54 PM

BSABSVR: is it gonna make you sweat?


Your comment makes me go Hmmmmmm...
 
2012-10-27 04:50:02 PM
This is their version of Turn Turn Turn.
 
2012-10-27 05:11:49 PM
My brother does this for a living. I never "really" understood the phrase master craftsman.
This shiat is magic.
 
2012-10-27 05:57:38 PM
Master craftsmen do that by hand. CNC operators are running a computer. Import file, make sure the machine has the required tools in the quick change turret, hit go.
 
2012-10-27 06:25:14 PM

vossiewulf: Master craftsmen do that by hand. CNC operators are running a computer. Import file, make sure the machine has the required tools in the quick change turret, hit go.


I have a lathe, milling machine w/rotary table and the skills to make that piece. It would take some time.You are correct CNC 'operators' are not machinists.
 
2012-10-27 06:34:08 PM
there's some crazy rough cuts going on there. Probably the only skill left there is checking tool paths (and doing enough rough cuts to be efficient with time), and knowing when your bits are getting dull.
 
2012-10-27 06:38:31 PM
still pretty basic compared to the 4D molecular pizza/mcburger printer i want to invent

of course it will be able to make other things like screws and stuff like that . but u can't eat screws!
 
2012-10-27 06:43:03 PM
Scoffs at your machine. Does it by hand.

i.imgur.com
 
2012-10-27 07:02:45 PM

Radak: Scoffs at your machine. Does it by hand.

[i.imgur.com image 447x594]


I'd love to see the machine spin down to a stop, read a young female celebrity Tweet in a robotic voice, then spin back up again.
 
2012-10-27 07:19:34 PM
Forgive my ignorance, but what the hell did it make?
 
2012-10-27 07:21:10 PM
Would have been nice to know just what in the hell it was making.
 
2012-10-27 07:27:35 PM
awesome a green. those machines are amazing
 
2012-10-27 07:34:13 PM

Lando Lincoln: Would have been nice to know just what in the hell it was making.


No shiat. I was hoping for at least a 360 spin of the finished product.
 
2012-10-27 07:36:37 PM

Lando Lincoln: Would have been nice to know just what in the hell it was making.


My guess is the video was "appropriated" from some original source that would have said what was being made. The machine is a Emco turn older model, I'm guessing 365. There are lots of vids on the net of emco turns but I didn't see the source for this vid in that video listing.
 
2012-10-27 08:12:26 PM
How did two round spinning things make a hexagonal thing?
 
2012-10-27 08:23:15 PM

Calmamity: How did two round spinning things make a hexagonal thing?


Came to ask that, and even had an image:

i.imgur.com

???
 
2012-10-27 08:33:59 PM

Calmamity: How did two round spinning things make a hexagonal thing?


By stopping the spinning, which it did in a few operations there, using the milling head and rotating the work 60 degrees 5 times.
 
2012-10-27 08:43:34 PM
The tool (which is very not round) that makes the hexagon shapes is shown at 1:21, then it spins up and ??? and then the holder spins down and you see six sides have been made in two places.

vossiewulf, your explanation of the ??? is insufficient. Both the holder and the miller appear to be operating at high RPM.
 
2012-10-27 08:50:52 PM

evilsofa: vossiewulf, your explanation of the ??? is insufficient. Both the holder and the miller appear to be operating at high RPM.


Actually you're right, it's using some asymmetrical cutter which cuts only on one side that is synced with the rotation of the work. Sorry, I wasn't paying that much attention and my description is a much easier way to do it.
 
2012-10-27 09:01:57 PM
It made the hexes when the machine slowed down spinning the piece and used a spinning cutting head. With the piece slowed down the cutting head could follow and cut the flats. Then it followed with a different bit that rounded the edges.

It would be a similar process to what they used on the second piece. The spinning cutting head acts like a mill and the piece can be rotated slowly to allow them to cut parts that couldn't be done by hand on a lathe.
 
2012-10-27 09:04:45 PM
I found that fascinating. I could watch that stuff all day. And I also wondered about the hexagonal cut, and assumed it was a blade/bit that was in tune with just the right spin rate. Never having seen anything quite like that, I wasn't sure though.
 
2012-10-27 09:11:08 PM
I worked in a machine shop running these right out of high school. Ran an Okuma and Howa 438V with a Fanuc controller. It was pretty neat turning a $38 forging into a $1500 part.
 
2012-10-27 09:16:07 PM

NBSV: It made the hexes when the machine slowed down spinning the piece and used a spinning cutting head. With the piece slowed down the cutting head could follow and cut the flats. Then it followed with a different bit that rounded the edges.

It would be a similar process to what they used on the second piece. The spinning cutting head acts like a mill and the piece can be rotated slowly to allow them to cut parts that couldn't be done by hand on a lathe.


Ha to watch it again. The hexes show up a bit later than I though. Looks like the bit isn't round and must be synced to a specific rpm for the diameter. The spinning speed of the piece changes between the two cuts. Still impressive.
 
2012-10-27 09:37:37 PM
So what exactly did this thing make? A shot of the finished product might have been nice.
 
2012-10-27 09:51:02 PM

Great_Milenko: So what exactly did this thing make? A shot of the finished product might have been nice.


It was making a precise amount of aluminum shavings of a specific size, weight, and flow to fit into a gummerator.

I was not able to ascertain precise what the gummerator was trying to gum up.
 
2012-10-27 09:58:57 PM

Calmamity: How did two round spinning things make a hexagonal thing?


Came here just to find the answer. Figured it was either magic or some kind of asymmetrical synchronized precision cutting blah blah blah.

/was really hoping it was magic
 
2012-10-27 10:05:09 PM

RoyBatty: Great_Milenko: So what exactly did this thing make? A shot of the finished product might have been nice.

It was making a precise amount of aluminum shavings of a specific size, weight, and flow to fit into a gummerator.

I was not able to ascertain precise what the gummerator was trying to gum up.


Oh, okay. I was thinking it might have been a torsion grunion for a turbo encabulator.
 
2012-10-27 10:10:23 PM
What happens to all the metal shavings?
 
2012-10-27 10:12:21 PM

RoyBatty: It was making a precise amount of aluminum shavings


The metal looked somewhat yellowish which might indicate a brass alloy. Anyway it was an easy to machine metal which meant there were no need for jets of cutting fluid and their back-splash which would mess up the close video.
 
2012-10-27 10:13:33 PM

usernameguy: What happens to all the metal shavings?


They are flavored with rotting goat and sold to trolls as snuff.
 
2012-10-27 10:22:03 PM
I have the weirdest boner right now.
 
2012-10-27 10:24:15 PM
It's interesting how technology takes its lessons from our daily lives...

If you watch carefully from 0:43 to 0:53, that is a perfectly executed imitation of introducing a woman to anal sex.
 
2012-10-27 10:36:51 PM
In this vid CTX gamma 2000 TC there appears to be a CNC lathe that is cutting gear teeth while the lathe is spinning, Woah that is some some super precise programming.
 
2012-10-27 10:55:42 PM
Here is a link to a .mpg video that explains polygonal turning on a lathe.

http://www.gsc-schwoerer.de/html_englisch/technologie/mehrkantdrehen .h tm
 
2012-10-27 11:11:07 PM

HairBolus: Anyway it was an easy to machine metal which meant there were no need for jets of cutting fluid and their back-splash which would mess up the close video.


Brass is usually machined dry.

StokeyBob: Here is a link to a .mpg video that explains polygonal turning on a lathe.


For some reason not getting a pic on that but it sounds like it's describing pretty much what I did, a spinning cutter which cuts only on one side running at a very specific RPM vs the work. I don't know, I don't use CNC machines I'm the old fashioned dial indicator and micrometer kind of machinist.
 
2012-10-27 11:16:38 PM
This machine is better: Link
 
2012-10-27 11:21:50 PM

StokeyBob: Here is a link to a .mpg video that explains polygonal turning on a lathe.

Link


Very nice video, thanks!

A subby, this link has definitely led to the most stuff I've learned on FARK in the past week. Thank you subby.
 
2012-10-27 11:22:58 PM

StokeyBob: Here is a link to a .mpg video that explains polygonal turning on a lathe.

http://www.gsc-schwoerer.de/html_englisch/technologie/mehrkantdrehen .h tm


This video should be shown to kids learning geometry.
 
2012-10-27 11:31:26 PM

BSABSVR: is it gonna make you sweat?


till you bleed.

Is that dope enough? indeed.
 
2012-10-27 11:35:28 PM

HairBolus: In this vid CTX gamma 2000 TC there appears to be a CNC lathe that is cutting gear teeth while the lathe is spinning, Woah that is some some super precise programming.


It's using a spinning gear hob, that's how most of your small gears are made, doesn't require any 'precise programming', you just have to set the spindle speed and get the tool at the right diameter from the lathe center and whammo. I do some work in P&H/Joy Global and they use a similar setup to turn gears, but their cutting heads are 2' tall and roughly 16" in diameter, they cut some pretty big stuff.

They have an even cooler tool that is just two parallel cutting wheels (think of it like giant circular saws, maybe 20" blades) that slices vertically through a gear laying horizontally, by the time it makes a full rotation the two gears have cut out triangular chunks forming the basis for the teeth all the way around, one blade cuts one side of the triangle and by the time it gets around the other blade gets a chance to cut the other side.
 
2012-10-27 11:39:44 PM

splohn: Calmamity: How did two round spinning things make a hexagonal thing?

Came here just to find the answer. Figured it was either magic or some kind of asymmetrical synchronized precision cutting blah blah blah.

/was really hoping it was magic


i182.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-27 11:43:10 PM

usernameguy: What happens to all the metal shavings?


Recycled I imagine.
 
2012-10-27 11:43:55 PM
I used to repair CNC machines.

I hated the one emco turn turret lathe we had. most of the manuals were in German (I know a little).
Parts had to come from Germany, and were hard to find.
It was 1 of only 5 in the US. The memory became corrupted, and they had to get the core programming from another one.

/hated that machine
 
2012-10-28 01:11:50 AM
 
2012-10-28 02:20:20 AM
pretty awesome.

We have something similar, but not for metals.

The hundegger SC3, wood truss component saw.

This thing cuts stair treads, truss parts, I-joists with mechanical holes...

pretty bad ass where technology has taken us. (Hundegger is a German company, crazy how advanced they are that anyone else)
 
2012-10-28 02:38:24 AM
Another interesting machine tool is the one built by Bihler. Its basically a progressive die wrapped around
a circle. It looks a lot like a radial aircraft engine. The center motor drives cams that actuate indvidual tools which
form the part. Typically, you get one part per revolution. The following vids show how it works. But
they don't really do it justice because they essentially show the machine at idle speed. The genius of the design
is that due to the rotation you can run these in production at very, very high speed.

Here's a simple d ring

Link

A more complicated hose clamp

Link

The above clip works better if you play powerhouse at the same time

Link

And a mix and match vid of several different parts (and also some more conventional progressive die machines
as well)

Link
 
2012-10-28 03:02:20 AM

realityVSperception: Another interesting machine tool is the one built by Bihler. Its basically a progressive die wrapped around
a circle. It looks a lot like a radial aircraft engine. The center motor drives cams that actuate indvidual tools which
form the part. Typically, you get one part per revolution. The following vids show how it works. But
they don't really do it justice because they essentially show the machine at idle speed. The genius of the design
is that due to the rotation you can run these in production at very, very high speed.

Here's a simple d ring

Link

A more complicated hose clamp

Link

The above clip works better if you play powerhouse at the same time

Link

And a mix and match vid of several different parts (and also some more conventional progressive die machines
as well)

Link


That machine will be in my nightmares. Looks like some sort of futuristic torture machine. Still, very cool.
 
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