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(Science Daily)   Scientists discover the first ever millisecond pulsar; PSR J1311-3430 in the Centaurus cluster spins 390 times per second, emitting gamma-ray photons deep into Space   (sciencedaily.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, PSR J1311, Centaurus, gamma-ray, Max Planck Institute, Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, Hanover, Fermi  
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6469 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Oct 2012 at 6:05 PM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-27 12:50:36 PM  
I heard the same thing about subby's mom yesterday, so...

/[citation needed]
 
2012-10-27 12:55:51 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-10-27 12:57:31 PM  
Oh, I thought it was submitter that failed. It's TFA headline that's retarded.
 
2012-10-27 06:08:15 PM  

cretinbob: Oh, I thought it was submitter that failed. It's TFA headline that's retarded.


Submitter did commit bizarro Capitalization.
 
2012-10-27 06:08:27 PM  
I; are, punctuate.
 
2012-10-27 06:09:19 PM  
"Then there's Space."

Hee.

*)
 
2012-10-27 06:10:57 PM  
Awesome! I'm sure this discovery has immediate applications. Right? No? Well, at least applications within the next thousand years of human technological advances, right?

No?

Well, gee.

I guess it's still a neat bedtime story.
 
2012-10-27 06:11:54 PM  
Black Widow's Tango Mortale in Gamma-Ray Light

This needs some kind of band, or movie, or graphic novelization, stat.
 
2012-10-27 06:13:25 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Black Widow's Tango Mortale in Gamma-Ray Light

This needs some kind of band, or movie, or graphic novelization, stat.


GRB, baby.

Worst of the worst.

*)
 
2012-10-27 06:15:53 PM  

HotWingAgenda: Awesome! I'm sure this discovery has immediate applications. Right? No? Well, at least applications within the next thousand years of human technological advances, right?

No?

Well, gee.

I guess it's still a neat bedtime story.


Millisecond pulsars can be used as great tests of general relativity (for example, millisecond pulsars timing arrays could be used to directly detect gravitational waves). They also probe scenarios which are simply not reproducible here on Earth - we can't create anything remotely similar to a rapidly rotating neutron star. So they are excellent probes of physics that can't be studied in any other way.

Now, the direct applications of such knowledge aren't known right now. But people insisted that studying electricity, or general relativity, or quantum mechanics was impractical at one point in time too. And we laugh at such people nowadays.
 
2012-10-27 06:16:12 PM  

HotWingAgenda: Awesome! I'm sure this discovery has immediate applications. Right? No? Well, at least applications within the next thousand years of human technological advances, right?

No?

Well, gee.

I guess it's still a neat bedtime story.


So, if a scientific discovery does not immediately benefit humanity in a tangible way, it's worthless?
 
2012-10-27 06:17:00 PM  
Any pictures of its boobies?
 
2012-10-27 06:17:11 PM  
When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.
 
2012-10-27 06:17:51 PM  
Wah?!

ct.fra.bz
 
2012-10-27 06:18:56 PM  
thegrassskirtblog.com
 
2012-10-27 06:19:48 PM  

GungFu: Wah?!

[ct.fra.bz image 500x326]


This is SO meaningful.

Thank you.
 
2012-10-27 06:21:02 PM  

Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.


Supernova, for one.

Yes, it's the whole star. But the star has collapsed to the size of a city by that point.
 
2012-10-27 06:23:42 PM  
I knew that.
 
2012-10-27 06:24:03 PM  

GypsyJoker: Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.

Supernova, for one.

Yes, it's the whole star. But the star has collapsed to the size of a city by that point.


You just wait until it gets to a point...
 
2012-10-27 06:24:29 PM  
WHAR GEEK TAB, WHAR???

/really, main page?
//Phil is behind this, isn't he?
 
2012-10-27 06:26:04 PM  

Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.


Normal pulsars spin pretty quickly due to conservation of angular momentum. Its exactly the same thing as a figure skater spinning slowly with her arms fully extended, then making herself spin more rapidly by pulling her arms in. This is conservation of angular momentum - basically, if something suddenly becomes smaller, it will start spinning faster (try it out yourself - start spinning in an office chair then pull your arms in).

A start that explodes goes from an object with a radius that might be tens of millions of miles to something with a radius that might be more like tens of miles. So it's going to be spinning really quickly.

Now a millisecond pulsar requires something extra to get spinning that fast. The current theory is that you start with a regular pulsar spinning pretty fast, but you then dump a bunch of matter (probably from a neighboring star) onto the pulsar. Due to conservation of angular momentum again, it starts to spin more and more quickly the more and more stuff that gets dumped onto it. So millisecond pulsars get "spun up" so that they can spin many hundreds of times per second).

And its pretty much the whole start thats rotating that fast.
 
2012-10-27 06:27:46 PM  
Also, my fingers really want to type "start" when my brain is thinking "star" apparently.
 
2012-10-27 06:28:42 PM  

Krazikarl: Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.

Normal pulsars spin pretty quickly due to conservation of angular momentum. Its exactly the same thing as a figure skater spinning slowly with her arms fully extended, then making herself spin more rapidly by pulling her arms in. This is conservation of angular momentum - basically, if something suddenly becomes smaller, it will start spinning faster (try it out yourself - start spinning in an office chair then pull your arms in).

A start that explodes goes from an object with a radius that might be tens of millions of miles to something with a radius that might be more like tens of miles. So it's going to be spinning really quickly.

Now a millisecond pulsar requires something extra to get spinning that fast. The current theory is that you start with a regular pulsar spinning pretty fast, but you then dump a bunch of matter (probably from a neighboring star) onto the pulsar. Due to conservation of angular momentum again, it starts to spin more and more quickly the more and more stuff that gets dumped onto it. So millisecond pulsars get "spun up" so that they can spin many hundreds of times per second).

And its pretty much the whole start thats rotating that fast.


Apostrophes and science, o, what could they do?

Postulation in process...

*)
 
2012-10-27 06:30:43 PM  

Krazikarl: Also, my fingers really want to type "start" when my brain is thinking "star" apparently.


Curious, stars started everything.

We are but dust of said, said he.

Poet out.

*)
 
2012-10-27 06:32:35 PM  
Why?
 
2012-10-27 06:33:35 PM  
So what does that equal in Conneticuts?
 
2012-10-27 06:34:43 PM  

cretinbob: Oh, I thought it was submitter that failed. It's TFA headline that's retarded.


What's wrong with TFA's headline? Subby did fail in that this is not the first-ever discovery of a millisecond pulsar; it's just the first discovered through its gamma-ray emissions.

/eat hot gamma rays, foolish centaurans
 
2012-10-27 06:35:48 PM  

Indubitably: GypsyJoker: Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.

Supernova, for one.

Yes, it's the whole star. But the star has collapsed to the size of a city by that point.

You just wait until it gets to a point...


It's spinning the size of a city? What?
 
2012-10-27 06:39:38 PM  
Currently there are approximately 130 millisecond pulsars known

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millisecond_pulsar

had to be said
 
2012-10-27 06:47:49 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Indubitably: GypsyJoker: Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.

Supernova, for one.

Yes, it's the whole star. But the star has collapsed to the size of a city by that point.

You just wait until it gets to a point...

It's spinning the size of a city? What?


When it gets to the point, it becomes a singularity, and then, my friends, it becomes dangerously close to becoming a black hole, a true singularity...

Boo.

*)
 
2012-10-27 06:51:24 PM  
It is a miracle we managed to survive in such a violent universe.
 
2012-10-27 06:54:37 PM  

rev. dave: It is a miracle we managed to survive in such a violent universe.


No, it isn't...
 
2012-10-27 06:55:06 PM  
someone smart tell me why I should care, ahh never mind Im gonna go make pudding and pff some more
 
2012-10-27 06:55:43 PM  

Indubitably: Gyrfalcon: Indubitably: GypsyJoker: Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.

Supernova, for one.

Yes, it's the whole star. But the star has collapsed to the size of a city by that point.

You just wait until it gets to a point...

It's spinning the size of a city? What?

When it gets to the point, it becomes a singularity, and then, my friends, it becomes dangerously close to becoming a black hole, a true singularity...

Boo.

*)


EEEEEEEKKK!
 
2012-10-27 06:55:52 PM  
Could gamma-ray photons fark up the GPS system? And would they be stopped by the lead plumbing of an ATM machine?
 
2012-10-27 06:56:37 PM  

Indubitably: rev. dave: It is a miracle we managed to survive in such a violent universe.

No, it isn't...


With a billion of a billion of a trillion possibilities, why subscribe?

*)
 
2012-10-27 06:57:42 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Indubitably: Gyrfalcon: Indubitably: GypsyJoker: Bedurndurn: When they say the star is spinning, is it just like the outer layer of the thing that's whipping around that fast or is the whole mass of the star turning? Also, what in the hell would have to happen to spin a star around hundreds of times a second? That seems like it would take a pants-poopingly-large amount of energy to get that much English on something that big.

Supernova, for one.

Yes, it's the whole star. But the star has collapsed to the size of a city by that point.

You just wait until it gets to a point...

It's spinning the size of a city? What?

When it gets to the point, it becomes a singularity, and then, my friends, it becomes dangerously close to becoming a black hole, a true singularity...

Boo.

*)

EEEEEEEKKK!


Two "k"s, plz/
 
2012-10-27 07:01:42 PM  
In Space no one can hear you spin.
 
2012-10-27 07:04:42 PM  

fusillade762: In Space no one can hear you spin.


In Space, it doesn't matter...

*)
 
2012-10-27 07:05:56 PM  
P.S. Thank you, anonymous?
 
2012-10-27 07:09:01 PM  
Forget the headline. The story is really cool.
 
2012-10-27 07:09:12 PM  
www.nerdglasseshq.com

It's all crystal clear now, subster.
 
2012-10-27 07:18:09 PM  
White star problems.
 
2012-10-27 07:23:30 PM  
loSaturnalia: Could gamma-ray photons fark up the GPS system? And would they be stopped by the lead plumbing of an ATM machine?

Well, they did cause a bit of an annoyance to Dr. Banner.....
 
2012-10-27 07:27:36 PM  

neednap: loSaturnalia: Could gamma-ray photons fark up the GPS system? And would they be stopped by the lead plumbing of an ATM machine?

Well, they did cause a bit of an annoyance to Dr. Banner.....


Seriously.

I read you.

Do you read me?
*)
 
2012-10-27 07:27:48 PM  

rev. dave: It is a miracle we managed to survive in such a violent universe.


Huh? If anyone in the planet could begin to comprehend how much space there is out there, you wouldn't be saying that. It's no more violent than say, weekend binges at the sorority house.
 
2012-10-27 07:30:23 PM  
4.bp.blogspot.com

Obscure?
 
2012-10-27 07:32:23 PM  
Dust in the wind....all they are is dust in the wind.....

I love Kansas.

Almost as much as I love Oz.
 
2012-10-27 07:52:38 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-27 07:53:25 PM  

Krazikarl: HotWingAgenda: Awesome! I'm sure this discovery has immediate applications. Right? No? Well, at least applications within the next thousand years of human technological advances, right?

No?

Well, gee.

I guess it's still a neat bedtime story.

Millisecond pulsars can be used as great tests of general relativity (for example, millisecond pulsars timing arrays could be used to directly detect gravitational waves). They also probe scenarios which are simply not reproducible here on Earth - we can't create anything remotely similar to a rapidly rotating neutron star. So they are excellent probes of physics that can't be studied in any other way.

Now, the direct applications of such knowledge aren't known right now. But people insisted that studying electricity, or general relativity, or quantum mechanics was impractical at one point in time too. And we laugh at such people nowadays.


It took around 150 years to go from "cathode rays sure are weird, farking magnets too" to "lets build a worldwide information network make of nearly atomically fine structures we drew with light and acid."
 
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