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(Daily Mail)   Want to eat like a caveman? Go easy on red meat and load up on veggies... and don't forget to pick up some Cocoa Pebbles cereal, too - part of this good breakfast   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 70
    More: Interesting, Tamsin O'Connell, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Cocoa Pebbles  
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7189 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Oct 2012 at 9:02 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-27 02:09:19 AM  
"Om nom nom nom nom....."
i.dailymail.co.uk
 
2012-10-27 02:22:37 AM  
Want to eat like a caveman? Go easy on red meat and load up on veggies, study reveals

"The study, published in November, pretty much says what ever other study published on the subject has said."

/old news, etc
 
2012-10-27 02:26:21 AM  
Want to eat like a caveman?

No.
 
2012-10-27 02:40:32 AM  
hunter-gatherers didn't just hunt, but also gathered? huh.
 
2012-10-27 02:52:11 AM  

log_jammin: hunter-gatherers didn't just hunt, but also gathered? huh.


They actually studied farmers.
 
2012-10-27 05:08:49 AM  
Want to eat like a caveman?

NO

They lived to be 20...if they were lucky, vegemitter

Actually a large part of the diet was eating carrion....carnivore leftovers...which explains why there's nothing like a ribeye that's been "aged' for 80 days
 
2012-10-27 06:47:31 AM  
img443.imageshack.us
 
2012-10-27 08:43:34 AM  

acanuck: Want to eat like a caveman?

NO

They lived to be 20...if they were lucky, vegemitter

Actually a large part of the diet was eating carrion....carnivore leftovers...which explains why there's nothing like a ribeye that's been "aged' for 80 days


Is not amused
goodmenproject.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com
 
2012-10-27 09:04:24 AM  
do this. now quick do the OPPOSITE! now quick do the other thing again! no wait DO something entirely different!!

ufandshands.org
 
2012-10-27 09:14:17 AM  
205.158.110.134 

bad fred, eat more veggies!!!
 
2012-10-27 09:16:03 AM  
We invent fire to cook steak and some people would rather chew on veggies? Jeez.

www.maxallancollins.com

/even your dog knows better
 
2012-10-27 09:18:04 AM  
So wait. If I eat mostly carbs I'll be insulin resistant, mostly fats I'll have heart disease, and apparently too much protein leads to 'nitrogen poisoning' according to TFA.
 
2012-10-27 09:23:20 AM  
Beware any article that has the word "perhaps".
 
2012-10-27 09:29:47 AM  
Don't forget spelt bread. As a bonus, it's really delicious.
 
2012-10-27 09:29:59 AM  

amquelbettamin: So wait. If I eat mostly carbs I'll be insulin resistant, mostly fats I'll have heart disease, and apparently too much protein leads to 'nitrogen poisoning' according to TFA.


Weird, almost as if some sort of balance is key for an omnivore. Still the nitrogen poisoning thing is a bit overblown as your liver can apparently quickly adapt to help out in that dept, though the discussion of this article elsewhere did lead me to the fascinating phenomenon of "rabbit starvation", where people can starve and develop intense hunger and cravings for fat if they subsist entirely on lean meats
 
2012-10-27 09:32:13 AM  
Really, no one caught that at the end? The comparison was to the first farmers, 12,000 years ago? How the fark is a farmer 12,000 years ago a caveman? And then it mentions Inuits and tosses away the fact that they do (still today) eat a majority animal based diet with....well they eat a lot of fat too! As if Cavemen didn't also eat the fat of the animals they killed. Fat is where the flavor is and observation of indigenous cultures has shown over and over again that when humans take game they eat the fat preferentially (and usually the offal too despite recently developed food aversions to offal in Western culture).....on account of it tasting better. Fat is where the flavor is. Red meat, devoid of fat isn't translated into a particularly yummy experience by our brains.

Very few people actually enjoy non-marbled, super lean meat. The brain is hardwired to like fatty and sweet things. If your wiring is different you are an anomaly. Congrats, your brain is a little different. But, for most humans fat was and still is consumed preferentially in hunter-gatherer diets. Inuits are not special because they eat fat. They just have more access to it because where they live the animals carry more fat. But, humans all over the globe throughout our eons of evolution have loved them some tasty animals. Because animal flesh is generally a nice mix of fat and protein.
 
2012-10-27 09:34:33 AM  

amquelbettamin: So wait. If I eat mostly carbs I'll be insulin resistant, mostly fats I'll have heart disease, and apparently too much protein leads to 'nitrogen poisoning' according to TFA.


Then why isn't Anthony Bourdain dead?
 
2012-10-27 09:38:49 AM  
I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?
 
2012-10-27 09:39:05 AM  
img30.imageshack.us

Sure, I like eggs.
 
2012-10-27 09:39:40 AM  
"That was surprising because only 45 per cent of present-day human diets come from protein of any type."
- If you're a pencilneck sissy whimp!
 
2012-10-27 09:47:40 AM  
Thank you, Science!!

/Vegetarian
//Fark you Farkers who trolled me in a previous bacon thread
///Fark you!!!!
////Extras slashie
 
2012-10-27 09:53:08 AM  

casual disregard: I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?


eat a carrot
 
2012-10-27 10:00:04 AM  

casual disregard: I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?


Take any vegetable, cut into bite size pieces, put in a bowl and cover with olive oil or coconut oil, sprinkle with salt, and then roast on a cookie sheet at 450*F until golden brown. Don't crowd the pan, let them breathe. I swear this makes everything mouthwatering good - even brussel sprouts (cut in half). Onions, carrots, peppers, eggplant, broccoli, and parsnips all work really well.
 
2012-10-27 10:06:04 AM  
Want to eat like a caveman? Eat whatever you can get unless you know it is poisonous.
 
2012-10-27 10:06:10 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: I swear this makes everything mouthwatering good


It truly does. Mmmmmmm now I want some roasted brussel sprouts and carrots.
 
2012-10-27 10:15:32 AM  

casual disregard: I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?


Is it the texture or flavour? I reckon keep it simple and add vegies slowly. Butter is your friend.
I recommend frozen corn kernals. Put 1/2 - 1 cup in a mug, dob of butter on it, cover it clingfilm with small hole, microwave one minute. Serve. Is tasty.
In my bachelor days i would add this to a lazy oven meal of chicken and wedges.
The frozen wedges probably another good veggie for you - potato that tastes good, especially the beer batter ones.
 
2012-10-27 10:25:55 AM  
The study is silly. If salmon are in abundance grizzly bears will eat the fat, skin and organs and leave the protein rich flesh for the birds. Just because cavemen didn't eat as much protein as is commonly portrayed doesn't mean they didn't get most of their nutrients from eating animals. It seems like the problem is that they are using the modern human concept of eating meat which usually means eating lean muscle tissue with the fat trimmed off.

I would like to see an explanation of how cavemen were able to find enough wild growing, abundant and widespread enough vegetation that they were able to make it a large part of their diets. Given how widespread humans were even in our caveman days you can be sure there were some groups that ate more or less vegetation and more of less meat depending on their environment. But you don't just walk out and find a field of carrots and sweet potatoes growing in the wilderness, fruits are in season for a few weeks at a time, most vegetation cannot be digested by humans so might come across an occasionally edible root, berry or herb but nothing that would actually sustain even an individual, never mind a whole family or group.
 
2012-10-27 10:31:10 AM  

Magorn: amquelbettamin: So wait. If I eat mostly carbs I'll be insulin resistant, mostly fats I'll have heart disease, and apparently too much protein leads to 'nitrogen poisoning' according to TFA.

Weird, almost as if some sort of balance is key for an omnivore. Still the nitrogen poisoning thing is a bit overblown as your liver can apparently quickly adapt to help out in that dept, though the discussion of this article elsewhere did lead me to the fascinating phenomenon of "rabbit starvation", where people can starve and develop intense hunger and cravings for fat if they subsist entirely on lean meats


There are a couple of essential fatty acids people cannot make themselves. Miss either one too long and the insulation of your nerves gets crappy and so on from recycling them into the related compounds the body builds from them (which is why they're essential, duh).
 
2012-10-27 10:32:38 AM  
farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2012-10-27 10:34:16 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: casual disregard: I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?

Take any vegetable, cut into bite size pieces, put in a bowl and cover with olive oil or coconut oil, sprinkle with salt, and then roast on a cookie sheet at 450*F until golden brown. Don't crowd the pan, let them breathe. I swear this makes everything mouthwatering good - even brussel sprouts (cut in half). Onions, carrots, peppers, eggplant, broccoli, and parsnips all work really well.


Notice that they have to be covered in fat before they can be considered good. And coconut oil is almost entirely saturated fat (which is good for you) but which is supposedly so bad for you and is given as the reason why you should eat veggies and not meat in the first place.
 
2012-10-27 10:44:28 AM  
i.qkme.me 
__

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: Don't forget spelt bread. As a bonus, it's really delicious.


Annnd... spelt.
 
2012-10-27 10:44:46 AM  

acanuck: Want to eat like a caveman?

NO

They lived to be 20...if they were lucky, vegemitter

Actually a large part of the diet was eating carrion....carnivore leftovers...which explains why there's nothing like a ribeye that's been "aged' for 80 days


From what understand, the short lifespan on hunter-gatherers is a myth: if they didn't die young from some infectious disease as child, they lived almost as long as people do today, and much longer than agricultural folks did before modern medicine. Don't forget: life expectancy is an average.
 
2012-10-27 10:49:09 AM  
Our pre-egrarian ancestors not only ate a LOT of animal (fat and meat and marrow) but they also had to chase it for miles. We didn't chase corn out of Africa and across the globe.
 
2012-10-27 10:50:59 AM  

macil22: Notice that they have to be covered in fat before they can be considered good.


The fat isn't really what makes it good. What the fat does is create a sort of mini-pressure cooker around the vegetable. It allows the inside of the vegetable to get hot enough to caramelize the sugars in the vegetable without turning the outside into carbon.

It's similar to why french fries taste better fried than baked. Baked can actually have more fat than properly fried french fries, but the fat keeps enough pressure around the potato to create tasty golden brown deliciousness.
 
2012-10-27 10:59:35 AM  
The comparison of hunter-gatherer homo sapiens to ourselves is just a bad comparison. We don't have their lifestyle, so we can't compare our diet to theirs. They ate high protein, high fat food but they used far more energy in their pursuit of each meal than we do.

A comparative sedentary lifestyle would allow for a more vegi-centric diet. This is why mankind has produced thing like vegans. Your weekly trip to Wholefoods doesn't require 6,000 calories.
 
2012-10-27 11:11:17 AM  
Makes sense. The source of red meat has the ability to avoid being sourced as red meat, while the source for plants doesn't really.
 
2012-10-27 11:17:43 AM  

macil22: The study is silly. If salmon are in abundance grizzly bears will eat the fat, skin and organs and leave the protein rich flesh for the birds. Just because cavemen didn't eat as much protein as is commonly portrayed doesn't mean they didn't get most of their nutrients from eating animals. It seems like the problem is that they are using the modern human concept of eating meat which usually means eating lean muscle tissue with the fat trimmed off.

I would like to see an explanation of how cavemen were able to find enough wild growing, abundant and widespread enough vegetation that they were able to make it a large part of their diets. Given how widespread humans were even in our caveman days you can be sure there were some groups that ate more or less vegetation and more of less meat depending on their environment. But you don't just walk out and find a field of carrots and sweet potatoes growing in the wilderness, fruits are in season for a few weeks at a time, most vegetation cannot be digested by humans so might come across an occasionally edible root, berry or herb but nothing that would actually sustain even an individual, never mind a whole family or group.


The answer is that they ate seasonally. Some things do store, but still, when berries are in season, you do like bears and gorge on berries.

And so far as fields of one plant: you obviously haven't spent much time outdoors. Hike around anywhere reasonable hospitable and you'll see ponds of watercress or hillsides of berry bushes or a wild grape vine, not to mention all the plants we can eat but don't because we found better stuff.
 
2012-10-27 11:17:59 AM  

MechaDupek: The comparison of hunter-gatherer homo sapiens to ourselves is just a bad comparison. We don't have their lifestyle, so we can't compare our diet to theirs. They ate high protein, high fat food but they used far more energy in their pursuit of each meal than we do.

A comparative sedentary lifestyle would allow for a more vegi-centric diet. This is why mankind has produced thing like vegans. Your weekly trip to Wholefoods doesn't require 6,000 calories.


Whoa, whoa, here. I'm sure our ancestors used vegetables in their daily diet quite often.

Mostly as bait.
 
2012-10-27 11:24:02 AM  
What did cavemen eat in the wild? Seriously, our guts aren't built to process grass. And if you pay attention, most of the old world veggies at the grocery store are variants on brassica, all of which are the product of selective breeding.

I'd have to agree that red meat probably wasn't a big part of the diet. Probably a lot more smaller animals, fish and fowl, with the occasional herd animal or carrion. Cows had to be domesticated somewhere and then radiated throughout the old world.
 
2012-10-27 11:25:17 AM  

Jon iz teh kewl: [ufandshands.org image 400x320]


img29.imageshack.us
 
2012-10-27 11:35:54 AM  

wildcardjack: What did cavemen eat in the wild?


I have a book on edible wild plants. It's really amazing what you can eat. Lots of leaves are edible, and so are a lot of roots, which are more calorie dense. Pretty much every part of a cattail (those big plants that look like poop) is edible, and those grow all around lakes. Mushrooms too. Chicken of the forest can be huge and would provide a lot of sustenance.
 
2012-10-27 11:41:59 AM  

casual disregard: I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?


You might be cloraphyl intolerant. My dietician diagnosed Me with that about a year ago.

If you can eat veggies that aren't green like carrots and beets that could be an indicator. Cloraphyl is what makes veggies green and is why I can eat veggies that aren't green.

My son is the same way, and I tried really hard to get him to eat green veggies.
 
2012-10-27 11:53:22 AM  

onyxruby: casual disregard: I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?

You might be cloraphyl intolerant. My dietician diagnosed Me with that about a year ago.

If you can eat veggies that aren't green like carrots and beets that could be an indicator. Cloraphyl is what makes veggies green and is why I can eat veggies that aren't green.

My son is the same way, and I tried really hard to get him to eat green veggies.


Hmm I may have had this. Would retch and barf if I tried to eat any green vegie. Over time i got used to green vegies, first by disguising their flavour in stirfry sauces etc. Took ~15 years. Now isnt so bad.
 
2012-10-27 12:15:22 PM  
i1136.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-27 12:25:12 PM  

offmymeds: i1136.photobucket.com


Give peas a chance.
 
2012-10-27 12:27:40 PM  
I don't know what you vegan pussies are talking about so here's a picture of the BA-K-47, the bacon based assault rifle.


latimesblogs.latimes.com
 
2012-10-27 12:28:54 PM  

amquelbettamin: So wait. If I eat mostly carbs I'll be insulin resistant, mostly fats I'll have heart disease, and apparently too much protein leads to 'nitrogen poisoning' according to TFA.


Don't worry so much about fat. Eat it with your protein and you'll be fine. The only fats you should avoid are trans-fats, anything that says hydrogenated, and rancid vegetable oils.


/grass-fed beef ftw
 
2012-10-27 12:52:22 PM  

El Dudereno: amquelbettamin: So wait. If I eat mostly carbs I'll be insulin resistant, mostly fats I'll have heart disease, and apparently too much protein leads to 'nitrogen poisoning' according to TFA.

Don't worry so much about fat. Eat it with your protein and you'll be fine. The only fats you should avoid are trans-fats, anything that says hydrogenated, and rancid vegetable oils.


/grass-fed beef ftw


Always good to hear from an expert. what are the results of your study aside from this?
 
2012-10-27 12:59:40 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: I don't know what you vegan pussies are talking about so here's a picture of the BA-K-47, the bacon based assault rifle.
[latimesblogs.latimes.com image 500x300]


THAT makes more sense than arguing about what ancient peoples ate, and how we would all be saved if only we ate a certain way too.

All you "foodies" do know that your obsession with every bite you put in your mouth used to be called "eating disorders," right?
 
2012-10-27 01:02:26 PM  

MadCat221: Makes sense. The source of red meat has the ability to avoid being sourced as red meat, while the source for plants doesn't really.


Most plants have some sort of toxin in them that makes them inedible at best, poisonous at worst. Carnivores have to work harder for their dinner, but at least it's safer to eat than what herbivores have to put up with.
 
2012-10-27 01:06:41 PM  

Rufus Lee King: "When them cavemens was sittin' in them caves, beatin' on them rocks, they said 'We ain't never gonna have radio!'"


LOL they had stereos
 
2012-10-27 01:29:12 PM  
Palaeontologists, in major breakthrough, realize that plants do not have bones.
 
2012-10-27 01:35:13 PM  

LiberalConservative: Hmm I may have had this. Would retch and barf if I tried to eat any green vegie.


That's exactly what I would do. I got in a /lot/ of trouble growing up because I couldn't eat green veggies. I literally would gag and throw up if I tried and my parents thought it was a show. Didn't matter how much trouble I got in, I simply could not eat green things.
 
2012-10-27 01:40:01 PM  
Cavewoman: Dear, I'm worried about your diet. You are eating an awful lot of mammoth. Granny Og always said that eating too much meat isn't good for you.

Caveman: I killed that mammoth and dammit, I'm going to finish it, even with no help from you and the kids. A cave man uses every part of the beast he kills.

Cavewoman: We are only a tribe of four, Honey, maybe you should take that into account. Besides, you didn't really hunt and kill the mammoth. You accidently fell out of the tree you climbed when you saw the mammoth. It may not really count as a "kill". It's more of an accidental death kind of thing.

Caveman: Why must you always be so criticial of my hunting?

Cavewoman: I'm just saying, Darling, maybe you should balance out the mammoth with more fruit, herbs, nuts and vegetables. How about I put some lettuce, tomato and onion on that mammoth burger? A double quarter pounder is a lot of meat to eat without any fixings. At least, eat a side salad. I'd feel better if you had something green besides the mammoth.

Caveman: Oh, all right. You win. Maybe I haven't been doing your gathering skills justice lately because of the mound of mammoth meat the size of some sort of device for carting people and property around. By the way, can I borrow that Lazy Susan you invented. Have you got three more of those?

Cavewoman: Sure. I've got more than I need. I even made a few big ones, thinking the Lazy Susan Principle might work well in the breakfast nook as a kind of shelf to eat off of.
 
2012-10-27 02:05:31 PM  

Skirl Hutsenreiter: And so far as fields of one plant: you obviously haven't spent much time outdoors. Hike around anywhere reasonable hospitable and you'll see ponds of watercress or hillsides of berry bushes or a wild grape vine, not to mention all the plants we can eat but don't because we found better stuff.


This. Here in the PNW, your family will never starve if you're in a rural area or in the mountains. Wild grapes, boysenberries, huckleberries, blackberries, raspberries, rose hips, gooseberries, walnuts, hazelnuts, chestnuts, various edible mushrooms, cattails, dandelion and other edible plants abound. If you locate a salmon run, you'll get plenty of protein fairly easily, at least part of the year.
 
2012-10-27 02:29:53 PM  
So if they ate that much meat they would've died young of Nitrogen poisoning? Wasn't the life expectancy less than 30?

But why in the hell would anyone want to eat like a caveman?
 
2012-10-27 02:35:15 PM  
And then it mentions Inuits and tosses away the fact that they do (still today) eat a majority animal based diet with....well they eat a lot of fat too!

The Inuit diet (before contact with Europeans) consisted of 95% animal products and 5% vegetable products (primarily berries).

I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?


You might be cloraphyl intolerant. My dietician diagnosed Me with that about a year ago.

If you can eat veggies that aren't green like carrots and beets that could be an indicator. Cloraphyl is what makes veggies green and is why I can eat veggies that aren't green.

I'm not as bad as you guys - no throwing up, but there is defiantly a nasty 'green' taste to all those veggies that people are promoting all the time. I am also a bitter taster so that doesn't help.

As for coating the veggies in oil and baking them, That seems to me that it would combine a nasty mashy texture with the already nasty flavor. With few exceptions (corn and beets), the only way I can handle any veggies is raw. Pickling seems to make them better as well. Can't eat cucumbers without blowing up from the gas, but pickles are fine.
 
2012-10-27 02:44:28 PM  

NotARocketScientist: I'm not as bad as you guys - no throwing up, but there is defiantly a nasty 'green' taste to all those veggies that people are promoting all the time.


So, you're one of...
www.wearysloth.com
 
2012-10-27 02:55:34 PM  
The article did NOT say that cavemen ate a "low protein" diet. Is said that they "got only 40-50 percent of that protein from meat". Get the bulk of your protein from vegetable sources, supplement it with meat.
 
2012-10-27 03:15:16 PM  

buckler: Skirl Hutsenreiter: And so far as fields of one plant: you obviously haven't spent much time outdoors. Hike around anywhere reasonable hospitable and you'll see ponds of watercress or hillsides of berry bushes or a wild grape vine, not to mention all the plants we can eat but don't because we found better stuff.

This. Here in the PNW, your family will never starve if you're in a rural area or in the mountains. Wild grapes, boysenberries, huckleberries, blackberries, raspberries, rose hips, gooseberries, walnuts, hazelnuts, chestnuts, various edible mushrooms, cattails, dandelion and other edible plants abound. If you locate a salmon run, you'll get plenty of protein fairly easily, at least part of the year.


It's more difficult than you think--the caloric expenditure required to get those things (I've tried) can come dangerously close to an amount greater than the caloric intake you receive from consuming them. Salmon excepted, you could get fat eating those.
But just nuts and berries--even here in the bountiful PNW--isn't really enough.
 
2012-10-27 03:34:31 PM  

Digitalstrange: So if they ate that much meat they would've died young of Nitrogen poisoning? Wasn't the life expectancy less than 30?

But why in the hell would anyone want to eat like a caveman?


lack of sex life, gay, etc..
 
2012-10-27 03:46:32 PM  
Hard to believe now for people who think their food comes from supermarkets, but before the land was divided up and sold and cleared and lawns put in, there might used to have been groves of fruit and nut trees, and other edible plants, growing wild all over. Fruit and nut trees would not have been cut down because the cave men didn't want the bother and mess of cleaning fruit and nuts off their lawn, and edible plants like sunflowers, and the wild ancestors of tomatoes, potatoes, greens and all other edible plants grew where ever their seeds could get started and may have made a huge thicket of themselves. Ever seen a pawpaw or berry patch that covers acres? Ever seen miles of arrowroot growing in shallow river areas? 

Also cavemen probably sometimes had to eat rotten or dried on the twig fruits, which can be found in or under trees even the next spring, and they also certainly starved at times. That is what your fat is for, to survive occasional starvation,

Also I believe that primitive man certainly ate the soft fresh grains from the tops of grasses, wherever they could find it. Just because they didn't bake does not mean they did not eat the fresh grain. 

Look around an empty lot. Can you find dandelion, chickweed, dock, purslane, chamomile, comfrey, nettles, and other weeds? They are edible, You could probably live off the weeds in your backyard for half the year if you had to. With greens, too, they regrow fast after you pick them. Cut the head off a lettuce plant and go back 4 weeks later, there is another head or two from the roots. Dig up a wild carrot or parsnip and leave a small bit of root, come back 6 weeks later and new rosettes of leaves have sprouted from that bit of root, though it takes longer to rebuild the root.

All the food plants you buy in the store used to grow wild wherever the seeds fell and survived.
 
2012-10-27 03:53:45 PM  

log_jammin: hunter-gatherers didn't just hunt, but also gathered? huh.


Make up your minds, Cavemen!!!
 
2012-10-27 03:59:10 PM  

WeenerGord: Hard to believe now for people who think their food comes from supermarkets, but before the land was divided up and sold and cleared and lawns put in, there might used to have been groves of fruit and nut trees, and other edible plants, growing wild all over. Fruit and nut trees would not have been cut down because the cave men didn't want the bother and mess of cleaning fruit and nuts off their lawn, and edible plants like sunflowers, and the wild ancestors of tomatoes, potatoes, greens and all other edible plants grew where ever their seeds could get started and may have made a huge thicket of themselves. Ever seen a pawpaw or berry patch that covers acres? Ever seen miles of arrowroot growing in shallow river areas? 

Also cavemen probably sometimes had to eat rotten or dried on the twig fruits, which can be found in or under trees even the next spring, and they also certainly starved at times. That is what your fat is for, to survive occasional starvation,

Also I believe that primitive man certainly ate the soft fresh grains from the tops of grasses, wherever they could find it. Just because they didn't bake does not mean they did not eat the fresh grain. 



All the food plants you buy in the store used to grow wild wherever the seeds fell and survived.


the food plants in the store are the result of sometimes, millenia of engineering--their wild equivalents have only a fraction of the calories and vitamins of the stuff in the store. Check out wild onions, strawberries to see what I mean.
 
2012-10-27 04:15:50 PM  

Watching_Epoxy_Cure: the food plants in the store are the result of sometimes, millenia of engineering--their wild equivalents have only a fraction of the calories and vitamins of the stuff in the store. Check out wild onions, strawberries to see what I mean.


Millenia of engineering? Really? Can you provide an example of a plant that took thousands of years of engineering to domesticate? Not sure what your point is, do you mean that cavemen couldn't eat wild food cos it was too small for you, so they had go hungry for 15,000 years in to the future with no food until their small wild plants were engineered to be big enough for you to deem them worthy of consumption?

The wild plants were smaller but still edible. You can eat crabapples, wild strawbs, etc. even now. I doubt they had less vitamins by volume, they just were smaller in volume. But they were growing wild everywhere, and you don't need the kind of calories people eat today to survive.

Also with many plants, such as onions, its not just the tiny bulb that is edible, it is the whole plant. Egyptian walking onion, for example, grows to 3-4 feet and you can eat all of it. 

Also ever seen a field of wild nettles? they will take over and squeeze out all other plants and cover miles. They are good to eat when young. Even if cut down when mature, they will send up new tender sprouts later in summer. So there could be hundreds or even thousands of pounds of food value in a field of nettles, where a city person would see only weeds to be sprayed with roundup and inedible grass lawns put in. Then of course, the grass would have to be kept short and prevented from producing edible seed.
 
2012-10-27 04:18:01 PM  

Watching_Epoxy_Cure: buckler: Skirl Hutsenreiter: And so far as fields of one plant: you obviously haven't spent much time outdoors. Hike around anywhere reasonable hospitable and you'll see ponds of watercress or hillsides of berry bushes or a wild grape vine, not to mention all the plants we can eat but don't because we found better stuff.

This. Here in the PNW, your family will never starve if you're in a rural area or in the mountains. Wild grapes, boysenberries, huckleberries, blackberries, raspberries, rose hips, gooseberries, walnuts, hazelnuts, chestnuts, various edible mushrooms, cattails, dandelion and other edible plants abound. If you locate a salmon run, you'll get plenty of protein fairly easily, at least part of the year.

It's more difficult than you think--the caloric expenditure required to get those things (I've tried) can come dangerously close to an amount greater than the caloric intake you receive from consuming them. Salmon excepted, you could get fat eating those.
But just nuts and berries--even here in the bountiful PNW--isn't really enough.


I'm sure it was difficult, and there's a good reason all of our ancestors supplemented with meat. But you would also have the advantage of tons of traditional knowledge about where the best fruit trees were, the most productive fields for certain seeds, etc. and when you should be visiting each that would save you a lot of energy wandering around.
 
2012-10-27 04:42:38 PM  

blacksho89: The article did NOT say that cavemen ate a "low protein" diet. Is said that they "got only 40-50 percent of that protein from meat". Get the bulk of your protein from vegetable sources, supplement it with meat.


The article never actually addresses Cavemen at least not as most people would define them which is of the Paleolithic era, What the study addressed was early farmers from 12,000 years ago which is no one's idea of a caveman and only barely qualifies as being paleolithic. Human evolution has been a 2 million year process. So yeah it makes a ton of sense to ONLY look at the last 12,000 years and say that is an adequate look at the historic diet of human beings as it relates to how/why we evolved as we did.
 
2012-10-27 06:31:01 PM  

macil22: The study is silly. If salmon are in abundance grizzly bears will eat the fat, skin and organs and leave the protein rich flesh for the birds. Just because cavemen didn't eat as much protein as is commonly portrayed doesn't mean they didn't get most of their nutrients from eating animals. It seems like the problem is that they are using the modern human concept of eating meat which usually means eating lean muscle tissue with the fat trimmed off.

I would like to see an explanation of how cavemen were able to find enough wild growing, abundant and widespread enough vegetation that they were able to make it a large part of their diets. Given how widespread humans were even in our caveman days you can be sure there were some groups that ate more or less vegetation and more of less meat depending on their environment. But you don't just walk out and find a field of carrots and sweet potatoes growing in the wilderness, fruits are in season for a few weeks at a time, most vegetation cannot be digested by humans so might come across an occasionally edible root, berry or herb but nothing that would actually sustain even an individual, never mind a whole family or group.


You can expand your definition of "food". This is a problem which has been known to result in people who starve in the midst of what differently-acculturated people would describe as abundance. You can find ways to make inedible shiat edible. California Indians discovered a number of clever although fairly labor intensive ways of doing that. The few modern people still living as hunter-gatherers usually get the majority of their calories from what is gathered, and work a shorter day than you do to do it.
 
2012-10-27 08:07:56 PM  

onyxruby: casual disregard: I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?

You might be cloraphyl intolerant. My dietician diagnosed Me with that about a year ago.

If you can eat veggies that aren't green like carrots and beets that could be an indicator. Cloraphyl is what makes veggies green and is why I can eat veggies that aren't green.

My son is the same way, and I tried really hard to get him to eat green veggies.


Maybe, but I doubt it. In my case, like I said, I have no problem eating green onions and green peppers. My main problem is the vegetables are either nasty or are prepared in a manner than turns them into a sodium-rich heart-stopping nightmare. Might as well get the cheeseburger.
 
2012-10-28 09:41:17 AM  

casual disregard: onyxruby: casual disregard: I'm definitely heavy on red meat and preserved foods (frozen etc.). Probably too much sodium as well.

I'd like to introduce more vegetables into my diet, but they are by and large farking disgusting. I can eat green onions and various peppers in moderation. That's about it. Help?

You might be cloraphyl intolerant. My dietician diagnosed Me with that about a year ago.

If you can eat veggies that aren't green like carrots and beets that could be an indicator. Cloraphyl is what makes veggies green and is why I can eat veggies that aren't green.

My son is the same way, and I tried really hard to get him to eat green veggies.

Maybe, but I doubt it. In my case, like I said, I have no problem eating green onions and green peppers. My main problem is the vegetables are either nasty or are prepared in a manner than turns them into a sodium-rich heart-stopping nightmare. Might as well get the cheeseburger.


sodium is fine. it's calorie free. remember calories in well 50000 mg daily sodium is part of a heart healthy = low calories deist
 
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