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(Huffington Post)   At what point does a beer quit being a beer and becomes a whisky? When it has a alcohol by volume (ABV) of a 65 percent and is called Armageddon   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 175
    More: Cool, Armageddon, malt liquors, BrewDog, percent increase, Fraserburgh, north coast, ABV, IPA  
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8454 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Oct 2012 at 9:37 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



175 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-10-25 09:24:29 AM
Let me guess: it's target demographic? College kids.
 
2012-10-25 09:34:05 AM
I wonder which flavour of Mountain Dew you're supposed to mix with it.
 
2012-10-25 09:39:53 AM
If you can buy it on Sunday in Texas, it's beer. If you can't, it's Whiskey
 
2012-10-25 09:40:03 AM
Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.
 
2012-10-25 09:41:10 AM
I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!
 
2012-10-25 09:41:45 AM
This headline makes my inner Grammar German all twitchy.
 
2012-10-25 09:42:20 AM
I had a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin a couple of years ago when it was the strongest, and it tasted like a a dark beer with whiskey poured in it. Never again shall I mix the two. Not in the same mug anyway.
 
2012-10-25 09:42:53 AM
Freeze fermentation? The process they're describing is freeze distilling. Fermantation has nothing to do with separating alcohol from water.
 
2012-10-25 09:43:26 AM
I could be wrong, but I think that the process described in TFA is freeze distillation not freeze fermenting.
 
2012-10-25 09:44:03 AM
I'll drink one
 
2012-10-25 09:44:13 AM
Shakes tiny fist at Radak
 
2012-10-25 09:45:49 AM
That sounds like it would taste like shiate.
 
2012-10-25 09:46:43 AM
When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %... but there are plenty of stouts/IPAs/ales in that range as well.

This is my favorite: Lost Abbey: The Angel's Share Grand Cru

So. Farking. Good.
 
2012-10-25 09:47:00 AM

WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!


There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.
 
2012-10-25 09:48:36 AM
Never.
 
2012-10-25 09:48:51 AM

calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.


This.
 
2012-10-25 09:49:53 AM

Radak: Freeze fermentation? The process they're describing is freeze distilling. Fermantation has nothing to do with separating alcohol from water.


So it's basically the recipe for Bud Ice, Molson XXX Ice, Labatt's Maximum Ice, and taking it a step further. Too far would be my guess. I could just add some everclear to my Victoria.
 
2012-10-25 09:50:26 AM

EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %


The only barleywine I ever had was utterly undrinkable.

Bitter as f*ck and tasted like blood.

I can't remember the name of it now.
 
2012-10-25 09:52:02 AM

jfivealive: I'll drink one


A pint, please, bartender.

Oh, and an ambulance on hand. I may die, but I'll be in heaven first.
 
2012-10-25 09:52:04 AM
I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!
 
2012-10-25 09:53:10 AM

Rev.K: EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %

The only barleywine I ever had was utterly undrinkable.

Bitter as f*ck and tasted like blood.

I can't remember the name of it now.


If you like good beer, don't judge them all off of one bad experience. If I had done that, I would have quit after my first beer (Stroh's). Stroh's literally translates to "piss straight from the cock". I'm pretty sure anyway... But I have no evidence to back that up.
 
2012-10-25 09:53:49 AM
When it's distilled and aged in oak barrels and doesn't have hops in it.

Really subtardmitter you're an idiot and should feel bad about yourself.
 
2012-10-25 09:55:11 AM

mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!

There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.


I realize that there's excellent micros out there. I just refuse to support an industry that's in the process of switching from making good beer to making gimmicks or yet another IPA. Where before it was quality, now marketing and bullshiat are now starting to dominate the craft beer industry.
 
2012-10-25 09:55:19 AM
For a quick second after reading the ingredients I thought I saw crystal meth.
 
2012-10-25 09:55:35 AM
It goes from beer to liquor at the moment it stops being brewed and starts being distilled.

Applejack is a liquor whereas hard cider is (not quite a) beer. Once you start artificially aiding the yeast, it's liquor. About the only counter-example I can think of is port, which is really a mixture of wine and liquor, and basically scoots by via grandfather clause.
 
2012-10-25 09:56:33 AM
Well, subby, it doesn't really matter how strong it is, if it hasn't had any contact with oak. Whisky is clearly defined as having to be stored in some sort of oak container-- in Scotland the requirement is 3 years minimum, whereas the US allows a "touch-and-go" to be called whisky, although not straight whisky.

Sounds like it's not really beer, either. But it sure as hell ain't whisky.
 
2012-10-25 09:57:03 AM

HST's Dead Carcass: I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!


They are probably shiatheads that got it cold and then drank a swig. Probably don't even know how they are supposed to drink that and then blamed the beer.

I have had very strong beers and you drink them more like you should drink good hard liquor.
 
2012-10-25 09:58:27 AM

hobnail: Well, subby, it doesn't really matter how strong it is, if it hasn't had any contact with oak. Whisky is clearly defined as having to be stored in some sort of oak container-- in Scotland the requirement is 3 years minimum, whereas the US allows a "touch-and-go" to be called whisky, although not straight whisky.

Sounds like it's not really beer, either. But it sure as hell ain't whisky.


It's done like an Eisbock. So in away it is distilled, but pwoplw still consider it a bear. Eisbock's have existed for a very long time.
 
2012-10-25 09:59:09 AM

Corvus: o in away it is distilled, but people still consider it a beer


FTFM
 
2012-10-25 09:59:33 AM

calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.


I wouldn't call this beer, either.

img1.findthebest.com
 
2012-10-25 10:01:04 AM
Armageddon me some of this.
 
2012-10-25 10:01:07 AM
Oh wow you can buy it online. I just might have to.
 
2012-10-25 10:03:16 AM

WhippingBoy: mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!

There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.

I realize that there's excellent micros out there. I just refuse to support an industry that's in the process of switching from making good beer to making gimmicks or yet another IPA. Where before it was quality, now marketing and bullshiat are now starting to dominate the craft beer industry.


That's like saying "Screw these restaurants making too fancy food, I'm going to McDonald's."
 
2012-10-25 10:03:35 AM

jfivealive: Oh wow you can buy it online. I just might have to.


depends on your state.
 
2012-10-25 10:03:51 AM

HST's Dead Carcass: I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!


High gravity beers have to be balanced well. There are many, many beers that taste like shiat at 12%. I've never had anything above 15% that I'd drink again. I can't imagine 65% being any good.

I think this is like the capsacin wars the chiliheads engage in. You reach a point where everything just tastes like shiat, but the percentage is higher so you "win".
 
2012-10-25 10:04:23 AM

EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %... but there are plenty of stouts/IPAs/ales in that range as well.

This is my favorite: Lost Abbey: The Angel's Share Grand Cru

So. Farking. Good.


I used to get down with Weybacher Brewery's Blithering Idiot barly wine at 13%. It's a fitting name. Weybacher brews some good stuff. I also enjoy their Merry Monks Ale at 11%.

Lost too many days to that brewery.
 
2012-10-25 10:04:45 AM

EZ Writer: If you like good beer, don't judge them all off of one bad experience. If I had done that, I would have quit after my first beer (Stroh's). Stroh's literally translates to "piss straight from the cock". I'm pretty sure anyway... But I have no evidence to back that up.


I'm not discounting all barleywine ever. I'm just saying that my first experience was unpleasant. I should try another one though.

As for the translation, I have a Ph.D in Latin and you are indeed correct.
 
2012-10-25 10:05:08 AM

Corvus: They are probably shiatheads that got it cold and then drank a swig. Probably don't even know how they are supposed to drink that and then blamed the beer.

I have had very strong beers and you drink them more like you should drink good hard liquor.


They are beer connoisseurs, they drink real beer. I can't recall the last time any of them tilted back something like Coors Light or Bud Light. It's all craft beer, all the time. The friend in question is a scotch snob. I proclaim they do know their alcohol, but still stated Tactical Nuclear Penguin tasted farking nasty. TNP is only 32%, the stuff in the article is almost twice as strong.
 
2012-10-25 10:05:19 AM

calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.


I guess you've never heard of an Eisbock?

http://www.germanbeerinstitute.com/Eisbock.html
 
2012-10-25 10:05:39 AM

uber humper: jfivealive: Oh wow you can buy it online. I just might have to.

depends on your state.


New York
 
2012-10-25 10:07:19 AM

Corvus: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

I guess you've never heard of an Eisbock?

http://www.germanbeerinstitute.com/Eisbock.html


No, I hadn't.
 
2012-10-25 10:07:38 AM
"Ice Beer" Characteristics and regulation

The ice beers are typically known for their high alcohol-to-dollar ratio.[1] In some areas, a substantial number of ice beer products are considered to often be bought by "street drunks", and are prohibited for sale.[4] For example, most of the products that are explicitly listed as prohibited in the beer and malt liquor category in the Seattle area are ice beers.[5]

Although "icing" increases alcohol content, most of the United States breweries simply add water back into their beer after the icing process to bring the alcohol content back down to nearly the same levels.[citation needed] Otherwise the beer would qualify as a "beer concentrate," which is illegal under ATF rules governing beer production



Looks like the ATF might spoil the party here in the States.


/Armageddon
//If you aren't a "street drunk", you will be
 
2012-10-25 10:08:15 AM

WhippingBoy: mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!

There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.

I realize that there's excellent micros out there. I just refuse to support an industry that's in the process of switching from making good beer to making gimmicks or yet another IPA. Where before it was quality, now marketing and bullshiat are now starting to dominate the craft beer industry.


Farking hipsters ruin everything.
 
2012-10-25 10:08:46 AM

Rev.K: EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %

The only barleywine I ever had was utterly undrinkable.

Bitter as f*ck and tasted like blood.

I can't remember the name of it now.


In Paradise rain tastes like blood...

//very obscure?
 
2012-10-25 10:10:38 AM

jfivealive: uber humper: jfivealive: Oh wow you can buy it online. I just might have to.

depends on your state.

New York


Looks to me like as long as there is someone over the age of 21 to sign for it when it comes, its no problem!

It is an $80 bottle of beer tho
 
2012-10-25 10:11:36 AM

HST's Dead Carcass: Corvus: They are probably shiatheads that got it cold and then drank a swig. Probably don't even know how they are supposed to drink that and then blamed the beer.

I have had very strong beers and you drink them more like you should drink good hard liquor.

They are beer connoisseurs, they drink real beer. I can't recall the last time any of them tilted back something like Coors Light or Bud Light. It's all craft beer, all the time. The friend in question is a scotch snob. I proclaim they do know their alcohol, but still stated Tactical Nuclear Penguin tasted farking nasty. TNP is only 32%, the stuff in the article is almost twice as strong.


Yes I know TNP. I have visited Brew Dog brewery on my last beer tour of Europe.

So they are knowledgeable about strong ales? What are their thoughts on beers like Mephistopheles or Samuel Adams Utopias? Do they have experience with Eisbocks too?
 
2012-10-25 10:11:49 AM

spacelord321: EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %... but there are plenty of stouts/IPAs/ales in that range as well.

This is my favorite: Lost Abbey: The Angel's Share Grand Cru

So. Farking. Good.

I used to get down with Weybacher Brewery's Blithering Idiot barly wine at 13%. It's a fitting name. Weybacher brews some good stuff. I also enjoy their Merry Monks Ale at 11%.

Lost too many days to that brewery.


YES, PLEASE! Had my first one just a few days ago. Good stuff. My other favorites are Aventinus, Franziskaner Dunkelweizen, and Tripel Karmeliet. If you haven't tried any of them, you won't be disappointed. Less wealthy, but not disappointed...
 
2012-10-25 10:12:44 AM

WhippingBoy: mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!

There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.

I realize that there's excellent micros out there. I just refuse to support an industry that's in the process of switching from making good beer to making gimmicks or yet another IPA. Where before it was quality, now marketing and bullshiat are now starting to dominate the craft beer industry.


I understand that sentiment. Think of it this way. If you support a microbrewery who doesn't cater to these gimmicks, than you're targeting a certain company and rewarding them for their behavior within the industry. They become more competitive against their brethren and are more likely to market according to that success. Don't ask me to name any because I haven't done any research regarding a company's entire catalog. You might have to find some local guys /or gals who don't have a blood contract with AB or Miller.

I'm still mourning the disgrace of Jagermeister, myself.
 
2012-10-25 10:13:32 AM
So anyone know who has the record for highest ABV beer where the final ABV is a result of yeast fermentation only? I think it was Utopias for a bit, but have any other non-distilled challengers appeared?
 
2012-10-25 10:14:40 AM

Amos Quito: "Ice Beer" Characteristics and regulation

The ice beers are typically known for their high alcohol-to-dollar ratio.[1] In some areas, a substantial number of ice beer products are considered to often be bought by "street drunks", and are prohibited for sale.[4] For example, most of the products that are explicitly listed as prohibited in the beer and malt liquor category in the Seattle area are ice beers.[5]

Although "icing" increases alcohol content, most of the United States breweries simply add water back into their beer after the icing process to bring the alcohol content back down to nearly the same levels.[citation needed] Otherwise the beer would qualify as a "beer concentrate," which is illegal under ATF rules governing beer production


Looks like the ATF might spoil the party here in the States.


/Armageddon
//If you aren't a "street drunk", you will be


Yeah about that. I saw Tactical Nuclear Penguin on sell last Thursday at brew pub. I have also seen it for sell at a couple of liquor stores.

That might be the law but it's not being enforced.
 
2012-10-25 10:15:17 AM

Buck Henderson: So anyone know who has the record for highest ABV beer where the final ABV is a result of yeast fermentation only? I think it was Utopias for a bit, but have any other non-distilled challengers appeared?


I have heard it's Utopias also.
 
2012-10-25 10:16:16 AM

Corvus: So they are knowledgeable about strong ales? What are their thoughts on beers like Mephistopheles or Samuel Adams Utopias? Do they have experience with Eisbocks too?


I would have to give him a call and ask him as he is not a farker. But, given his time spent in Europe and Asia while in the military, and the fact he really enjoys his booze, I would say he has to have some kind of opinion on the matter, but I would not know it.
 
2012-10-25 10:17:41 AM

gopher321: Let me guess: it's target demographic? College kids.


Probably way too expensive for college kids who look for good alcohol/price ratio. Cheap beer and vodka is easier to get and chug. Why buy a single bottle of Dogfish Head 120 Min IPA for $10, when you can get a 12 pack of basic American Lager for the same price?
 
2012-10-25 10:17:48 AM
As a teenager I tried making applejack by freeze-distilling some alcoholic cider.

Not only does removal of water as ice concentrate the alcohol, it also concentrates every thing else such as sugar and flavor compounds.

To produce 65% ABV the starting point should be very dry and near flavorless and even then it will wind up concentrating congeners and nasty flavors.
 
2012-10-25 10:18:48 AM

EZ Writer: spacelord321: EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %... but there are plenty of stouts/IPAs/ales in that range as well.

This is my favorite: Lost Abbey: The Angel's Share Grand Cru

So. Farking. Good.

I used to get down with Weybacher Brewery's Blithering Idiot barly wine at 13%. It's a fitting name. Weybacher brews some good stuff. I also enjoy their Merry Monks Ale at 11%.

Lost too many days to that brewery.

YES, PLEASE! Had my first one just a few days ago. Good stuff. My other favorites are Aventinus, Franziskaner Dunkelweizen, and Tripel Karmeliet. If you haven't tried any of them, you won't be disappointed. Less wealthy, but not disappointed...


Thanks. Made a note of those. Trying new beers is always a good excuse to drink!
 
2012-10-25 10:19:28 AM

WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!


That's the dumbest, most asinine thing that I've heard all day and I've spent the bulk of the morning watching election coverage on CNN.
 
2012-10-25 10:22:29 AM

HST's Dead Carcass: Corvus: So they are knowledgeable about strong ales? What are their thoughts on beers like Mephistopheles or Samuel Adams Utopias? Do they have experience with Eisbocks too?

I would have to give him a call and ask him as he is not a farker. But, given his time spent in Europe and Asia while in the military, and the fact he really enjoys his booze, I would say he has to have some kind of opinion on the matter, but I would not know it.


It depends a lot on where in Europe they were. Much of Europe is not very good beer. Areas like Belgium are very good and pockets here and there. In-Bev is owned by Anheuser-Busch and there stuff is swill. And only recently has any good beers come out of Asia.

I have friends who "really enjoy booze" but they have no farking idea what they are drinking. Just because your not drinking a "coors" or "bud light" doesn't make you some beer expert.
 
2012-10-25 10:23:15 AM
I ordered one. Looking forward to the novelty of it.
 
2012-10-25 10:23:57 AM
I doubt this will make me switch my my prefered brand:
jrburch.com
 
2012-10-25 10:24:07 AM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-25 10:24:17 AM

gopher321: Let me guess: it's target demographic? College kids.


Yup. And it's only a matter of time before some frat kid shotguns five or six of these in a row, smashes the bottles against his forehead, then keels over and dies.
 
2012-10-25 10:24:53 AM
When freeze distilling is done right: 

thefullpint.com
 
2012-10-25 10:25:24 AM
I bought one, couldn't resist. Be here in time for thanksgiving!
 
2012-10-25 10:25:35 AM

NutWrench: gopher321: Let me guess: it's target demographic? College kids.

Yup. And it's only a matter of time before some frat kid shotguns five or six of these in a row, smashes the bottles against his forehead, then keels over and dies.


And nothing of value will be lost...
 
2012-10-25 10:25:37 AM

jfivealive: jfivealive: uber humper: jfivealive: Oh wow you can buy it online. I just might have to.

depends on your state.

New York

Looks to me like as long as there is someone over the age of 21 to sign for it when it comes, its no problem!

It is an $80 bottle of beer tho


In 30 years you could tell people about the $80 bottle of beer you drank, not the glass of PBR.
 
2012-10-25 10:27:14 AM

mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.....

.....If you support a microbrewery who doesn't cater to these gimmicks, than you're targeting a certain company and rewarding them for their behavior within the industry.


Well said mortimer.

There is indeed much ridiculousness out there, but a lot of it is due to producers feeling the need to scream out above the rabble. The daunting array of options and certain consumers' ADD-like purchasing tendancies sometimes makes this seem like the only option to gain eyeballs on the shelf.

As mortimer said, if you seek out and reward producers who are doing things the way YOU think they should, they are more likely to thrive and be encouragement to others.

Everyboday should find a good bottle shop or beer bar with knowledgeable staff and become their friend. Yes, some of them can be needlessly trend-whorey or generally snobbish, but not all of them are. Explain what you like, and the good ones will listen to you and point you to (or start purchasing) the good producers.
 
2012-10-25 10:28:01 AM

calm like a bomb: HST's Dead Carcass: I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!

High gravity beers have to be balanced well. There are many, many beers that taste like shiat at 12%. I've never had anything above 15% that I'd drink again. I can't imagine 65% being any good.

I think this is like the capsacin wars the chiliheads engage in. You reach a point where everything just tastes like shiat, but the percentage is higher so you "win".


Nothing over 15% that you've liked?

A challenger approaches:

www.dogfish.com
 
2012-10-25 10:31:25 AM

kbotc: calm like a bomb: HST's Dead Carcass: I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!

High gravity beers have to be balanced well. There are many, many beers that taste like shiat at 12%. I've never had anything above 15% that I'd drink again. I can't imagine 65% being any good.

I think this is like the capsacin wars the chiliheads engage in. You reach a point where everything just tastes like shiat, but the percentage is higher so you "win".

Nothing over 15% that you've liked?

A challenger approaches:

[www.dogfish.com image 112x400]


Yes, great beer. here is a couple other very nice +15%ers

Samuel Adams Utopias
www.boston.com
27%

thefullpint.com
15.1%
 
2012-10-25 10:31:41 AM

WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!


Don't give up on all microbrews. There's plenty of good stuff still out there. I agree though, some of this stuff has gotten really stupid, but if you're paying attention it's not hard to avoid.
 
2012-10-25 10:32:39 AM
i don't drink for flavor
i drink to get drunk

/pretty sure all of u are the same way
//after all this is FARK
 
2012-10-25 10:33:14 AM
www.ratebeer.com
This guy is only 11% but to all the Barley Wine haters of before, this one is one of-- if not my favorite.
 
2012-10-25 10:34:52 AM

Buck Henderson: So anyone know who has the record for highest ABV beer where the final ABV is a result of yeast fermentation only? I think it was Utopias for a bit, but have any other non-distilled challengers appeared?


I'm pretty sure Utopias still reigns. It's made using champagne yeast so they could tolerate the higher ABV.
 
2012-10-25 10:36:14 AM
Another great high alcohol beer:

definitiveale.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-10-25 10:37:09 AM
I really like Corona. You've probably heard of it - it's readily available everywhere.
 
2012-10-25 10:37:41 AM

TofuTheAlmighty: Buck Henderson: So anyone know who has the record for highest ABV beer where the final ABV is a result of yeast fermentation only? I think it was Utopias for a bit, but have any other non-distilled challengers appeared?

I'm pretty sure Utopias still reigns. It's made using champagne yeast so they could tolerate the higher ABV.


I had heard that they developed their own yeast. I don't think normal champagne yeast can go that high. I am pretty sure that they developed their own proprietary yeast for it.
 
2012-10-25 10:38:00 AM
I'm with the rest here - when you distil it rather than brew it, it's not a beer, it's a whisky. This applies regardless of the method of distillation.

/The stuff sounds horiffic.
 
2012-10-25 10:40:11 AM

kbotc: calm like a bomb: HST's Dead Carcass: I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!

High gravity beers have to be balanced well. There are many, many beers that taste like shiat at 12%. I've never had anything above 15% that I'd drink again. I can't imagine 65% being any good.

I think this is like the capsacin wars the chiliheads engage in. You reach a point where everything just tastes like shiat, but the percentage is higher so you "win".

Nothing over 15% that you've liked?

A challenger approaches:

[www.dogfish.com image 112x400]


The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.
 
2012-10-25 10:41:03 AM

Private_Citizen: I'm with the rest here - when you distil it rather than brew it, it's not a beer, it's a whisky. This applies regardless of the method of distillation.

/The stuff sounds horiffic.


So Eisbocks are not beers anymore? They have been for 100 years.

So you think whiskey has hops in it and doesn't need to be aged in barrels? Wow you must drink shiat whiskey.
 
2012-10-25 10:42:08 AM

calm like a bomb: The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.


What state do you live in?
 
2012-10-25 10:42:56 AM

Private_Citizen: I'm with the rest here - when you distil it rather than brew it, it's not a beer, it's a whisky. This applies regardless of the method of distillation.

/The stuff sounds horiffic.


so mighty risky

or a beer engineer?
 
2012-10-25 10:44:32 AM

EZ Writer: Rev.K: EZ Writer: When they become barley wines? Barley wines typically start at 8-12 %

The only barleywine I ever had was utterly undrinkable.

Bitter as f*ck and tasted like blood.

I can't remember the name of it now.

If you like good beer, don't judge them all off of one bad experience. If I had done that, I would have quit after my first beer (Stroh's). Stroh's literally translates to "piss straight from the cock". I'm pretty sure anyway... But I have no evidence to back that up.


Wouldn't that create a naming copyright issue with Corona?
 
2012-10-25 10:45:13 AM

calm like a bomb: The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.


120 min is very hard to find. Utopias shouldn't be that bad. They should have it (or can get it) at a high end liquor store or bottle store that knows anything craft beer.
 
2012-10-25 10:45:14 AM

Corvus: calm like a bomb: The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.

What state do you live in?


NC
 
2012-10-25 10:45:21 AM

Corvus: I have friends who "really enjoy booze" but they have no farking idea what they are drinking. Just because your not drinking a "coors" or "bud light" doesn't make you some beer expert.


We all worked at a local brewery and he helped design the On On Ale, a dark and hoppy little creation of about 8% ABV. He was a great fan of their Milk Stout as well. I really wish I could give better credentials for his snobbery, but alas, I am 8 years sober and don't touch the stuff (even though I worked at the brewery). We used to be roommate and he said I was the greatest roommate EVAR because he never had to worry about his beer and scotch getting drank.

I will say I totally trust his judgment on these things, as we used to drink together back in the day.
 
2012-10-25 10:45:50 AM
Fuggin Bizzy

I really like Corona
. You've probably heard of it - it's readily available everywhere.



You must be a girl?
 
2012-10-25 10:46:42 AM

This text is now purple: It goes from beer to liquor at the moment it stops being brewed and starts being distilled.

Applejack is a liquor whereas hard cider is (not quite a) beer. Once you start artificially aiding the yeast, it's liquor. About the only counter-example I can think of is port, which is really a mixture of wine and liquor, and basically scoots by via grandfather clause.


Also, the process described in TFA:

The beer then undergoes a process called freeze fermenting, which involves cooling the beer to freezing. The water freezes, but the alcohol does not -- when the ice is removed a very strong beer remains.

Is known as "jacking." It's how applejack was first created.

Long before San Diego, settlers were Jackin' it in New England.
 
2012-10-25 10:47:01 AM
There's a place here in Baton Rouge that sells Armageddon and Tactical Nuclear Penguin among their other 400 beers. Problem is, they cost $300 and $150 respectively. Would like to try them some day.
 
2012-10-25 10:47:55 AM

Jon iz teh kewl: i don't drink for flavor
i drink to get drunk

/pretty sure all of u are the same way
//after all this is FARK


There was a time when I drank to get drunk. Now I prefer to have a couple of flavorful beers to rub the edge off and then switch to low alcohol crap beer to sustain the buzz without getting stupid.
 
2012-10-25 10:48:21 AM

Corvus: They should have it (or can get it) at a high end liquor store or bottle store that knows anything craft beer.


And therein lies my quandary. One decent beer store around, I asked, they couldn't.
 
2012-10-25 10:48:34 AM

calm like a bomb: kbotc: calm like a bomb: HST's Dead Carcass: I bought a friend a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin by the same company. It was $60 for a 20 oz bottle. He and some friends cracked it open for hsi birthday, they said it tasted farking nasty!

High gravity beers have to be balanced well. There are many, many beers that taste like shiat at 12%. I've never had anything above 15% that I'd drink again. I can't imagine 65% being any good.

I think this is like the capsacin wars the chiliheads engage in. You reach a point where everything just tastes like shiat, but the percentage is higher so you "win".

Nothing over 15% that you've liked?

A challenger approaches:

[www.dogfish.com image 112x400]

The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.


If you can find 120 min try it - it's not an IPA in the traditional sense. It's surprisingly sweet with floral and citrus notes, but depends on the year you get: some are good, some aren't as good. 

Of course the owner of Dogfish gets on his extreme crazy beer phase and won't brew the stuff that people actually like and drink.
 
2012-10-25 10:49:52 AM

calm like a bomb: Corvus: calm like a bomb: The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.

What state do you live in?

NC


Bummer. Here in California craft beer fall from the trees. I most likely could find Utopias in walking distance. (but I do live in one of the biggest craft beer cities, in the area of town with some of the greatest craft beer bars and stores).
 
2012-10-25 10:51:00 AM

Corvus: Private_Citizen: I'm with the rest here - when you distil it rather than brew it, it's not a beer, it's a whisky. This applies regardless of the method of distillation.

/The stuff sounds horiffic.

So Eisbocks are not beers anymore? They have been for 100 years.

So you think whiskey has hops in it and doesn't need to be aged in barrels? Wow you must drink shiat whiskey.


You are correct, it's not a whisky - I was copying subbies title. However, I would still class it as a distilled spirit.

At 65%, it sure sure isn't a beer anymore.

/I'm partial to Elijah Craig 18yo, but it's sold out world wide right now. I do have some barrel strength I bought when I was at HH.
 
2012-10-25 10:51:33 AM

syberpud: If you can find 120 min try it - it's not an IPA in the traditional sense. It's surprisingly sweet with floral and citrus notes, but depends on the year you get: some are good, some aren't as good.


good point. Yes it's not like an IPA. It's dry and sweet not what most people would expect from an IPA.
 
2012-10-25 10:51:49 AM

Rincewind53: WhippingBoy: mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!

There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.

I realize that there's excellent micros out there. I just refuse to support an industry that's in the process of switching from making good beer to making gimmicks or yet another IPA. Where before it was quality, now marketing and bullshiat are now starting to dominate the craft beer industry.

That's like saying "Screw these restaurants making too fancy food, I'm going to McDonald's."


No. It's like saying "These restaurants used to make sublime meals... but now they're switching to wacky molecular gastronomy... I'm going to McDonald's".

Admittedly, I'm being overly dramatic. In all likelihood I'll just buy from craft brewers that haven't yet resorted to some sort of gimmick (or don't produce yet another ubiquitous IPA).
 
2012-10-25 10:52:26 AM

HairBolus: As a teenager I tried making applejack by freeze-distilling some alcoholic cider.

Not only does removal of water as ice concentrate the alcohol, it also concentrates every thing else such as sugar and flavor compounds.

To produce 65% ABV the starting point should be very dry and near flavorless and even then it will wind up concentrating congeners and nasty flavors.


Along with some other nasty shiat that would normally be left behind in a true distillation.

/Wanted to '"jack" some hard cider from a local source; they talked me out of it.
 
2012-10-25 10:55:06 AM

Corvus: calm like a bomb: Corvus: calm like a bomb: The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.

What state do you live in?

NC

Bummer. Here in California craft beer fall from the trees. I most likely could find Utopias in walking distance. (but I do live in one of the biggest craft beer cities, in the area of town with some of the greatest craft beer bars and stores).


Actually, it's a pretty decent place to be as far as craft beer goes. A number of very good breweries have established here since the Pop the Cap initiative passed: Duck-Rabbit, Lone Rider, Fullsteam, Triangle, Highland, and French Broad to name a few. New Belgium has also decided to open an east coast brewery in Asheville. We aren't California by any measure, but we're getting there.
 
2012-10-25 10:57:06 AM

Private_Citizen: /I'm partial to Elijah Craig 18yo, but it's sold out world wide right now. I do have some barrel strength I bought when I was at HH.


How do you prefer to drink that?

Normally I do neat or maybe a few drops of "branch"

This is one of my favs:

img.thewhiskyexchange.com
Auchentoshan Three Wood

So is this:
uncrate.com 
Yamazaki These Japanese Whisky is done like a scotch.
 
2012-10-25 10:57:56 AM

calm like a bomb: Actually, it's a pretty decent place to be as far as craft beer goes. A number of very good breweries have established here since the Pop the Cap initiative passed: Duck-Rabbit, Lone Rider, Fullsteam, Triangle, Highland, and French Broad to name a few. New Belgium has also decided to open an east coast brewery in Asheville. We aren't California by any measure, but we're getting there.


Yeah I heard about New Belgium. They are one of my favorite breweries.
 
2012-10-25 10:59:01 AM

calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.


Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.
 
2012-10-25 10:59:05 AM

Fuggin Bizzy: I really like Corona. You've probably heard of it - it's readily available everywhere.


Yea, isn't that the stuff that comes out of my kitchen faucet?
 
2012-10-25 10:59:42 AM

karnal: You must be a girl?


I've been brewing for almost 20 years. I've traveled to Germany, Belgium, UK, Czech Republic, and had a lot of fine brews. I've had plenty of the celebrity beers that are quite popular now as well such as Heady Topper, Pliny, Kate the Great, Westy 12, and next weekend I will be at Ebeneezer's in Maine to have some Black Albert. And I like Corona. Not only that, but Corona Light with a lime in it.
 
2012-10-25 11:00:28 AM

jshine: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.


This is to beer what cognac is to Champagne. Or brandy to wine....
 
2012-10-25 11:01:59 AM

Corvus: Yeah I heard about New Belgium. They are one of my favorite breweries.


I attended a tasting dinner with one of their brewers last year. They seemed really excited to be moving to the area. And I agree- I like many of their products, although I cannot drink Fat Tire.
 
2012-10-25 11:02:41 AM

jshine: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.


which has been used for 100 years to make Eisbocks. Yes in a way it's distilling but it's not some sort of crazy new trick for beers.
 
2012-10-25 11:03:31 AM
A taste test with two hot chicks? Looks like that guy was hoping that the booze would go to their heads and he would get lucky...
 
2012-10-25 11:06:13 AM

Corvus: jshine: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.

which has been used for 100 years to make Eisbocks. Yes in a way it's distilling but it's not some sort of crazy new trick for beers.


...sure, but what makes a high ABV impressive in beer is that it occurs by natural fermentation. Once you start applying technology to concentrate the alcohol, there's really no trick whatsoever to making the ABV as high as you please. At that point, 65% becomes about as impressive as 3% -- or 99%. All are quite possible with the right methods (though distilling past the azeotrope would require methods beyond simple distillation).

/chemical engineer
 
2012-10-25 11:06:47 AM

calm like a bomb: Corvus: Yeah I heard about New Belgium. They are one of my favorite breweries.

I attended a tasting dinner with one of their brewers last year. They seemed really excited to be moving to the area. And I agree- I like many of their products, although I cannot drink Fat Tire.


I think Fat Tire is ok. Fat Tire and Sierra Nevada are kind of my "beers I'll bring to something because most people don't get craft beer and I need to bring a good amount of beer" beer. When I am out drinking beer I wont get one but if it's like a picnic or camping or something I might bring some to fill out the beer and in addition bring some better beers.

ALso they used to be the few craft beers you could get in cans (when I camp many places have "no glass" rules) but now you can get much more craft beer in cans but choices are still limited.
 
2012-10-25 11:09:06 AM
WinoRhino


karnal: You must be a girl?

I've been brewing for almost 20 years. I've traveled to Germany, Belgium, UK, Czech Republic, and had a lot of fine brews. I've had plenty of the celebrity beers that are quite popular now as well such as Heady Topper, Pliny, Kate the Great, Westy 12, and next weekend I will be at Ebeneezer's in Maine to have some Black Albert. And I like Corona. Not only that, but Corona Light with a lime in it.



Hey - don't get me wrong. I am glad there are watered down beers out there for you girls. Drink up, Missy.
 
2012-10-25 11:09:07 AM

jshine: Corvus: jshine: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.

which has been used for 100 years to make Eisbocks. Yes in a way it's distilling but it's not some sort of crazy new trick for beers.

...sure, but what makes a high ABV impressive in beer is that it occurs by natural fermentation. Once you start applying technology to concentrate the alcohol, there's really no trick whatsoever to making the ABV as high as you please. At that point, 65% becomes about as impressive as 3% -- or 99%. All are quite possible with the right methods (though distilling past the azeotrope would require methods beyond simple distillation).

/chemical engineer


What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?
 
2012-10-25 11:10:10 AM

jshine: Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.


Their process, as described in the article, is the same used to create Eisbocks, which certainly are beer:

From Wikipedia: Eisbock is a traditional specialty beer of the Kulmbach district of Germany that is made by partially freezing a doppelbock and removing the water ice to concentrate the flavour and alcohol content, which ranges from 9% to 13% by volume. It is clear, with a colour ranging from deep copper to dark brown in colour, often with ruby highlights. Although it can pour with a thin off-white head, head retention is frequently impaired by the higher alcohol content. The aroma is intense, with no hop presence, but frequently can contain fruity notes, especially of prunes, raisins, and plums. Mouthfeel is full and smooth, with significant alcohol, although this should not be hot or sharp.

I highlighted that last part. There is NO WAY a 65% beer will not taste "hot." Plenty of extremely experienced and talented brewers have a difficult time rounding out the profiles of 10% beers. Someone upthread mentioned it, but this is a gimmick. It's akin to hot-sauce contests where flavor, balance and character are completely abandoned in favor of one sole aspect which is used to beat you over the head. This isn't beer. It's a bastardization.
 
2012-10-25 11:11:29 AM

karnal: Hey - don't get me wrong. I am glad there are watered down beers out there for you girls. Drink up, Missy.


Heh. You're not only clever, you're obviously really knowledgeable! Tell us more about things you like and don't like.
 
2012-10-25 11:12:03 AM

jshine: ...sure, but what makes a high ABV impressive in beer is that it occurs by natural fermentation. Once you start applying technology to concentrate the alcohol, there's really no trick whatsoever to making the ABV as high as you please. At that point, 65% becomes about as impressive as 3% -- or 99%. All are quite possible with the right methods (though distilling past the azeotrope would require methods beyond simple distillation).


Yes there is. It becomes harder and harder to extract water as you go (just like heat distilling).

If you have a method that you can turn a dial and set how much water you extract from a mash without extracting the other elements in one simple process please tell me because you would make millions in distilling. Because no one else in the distilling business seems to be aware of this.

I would say column distillation is probably the most exact method used and it's still a far cry from what you are saying can be done. And this process is a lot less exact then that.
 
2012-10-25 11:13:05 AM

uber humper: What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?


Samuel Adams has one that can go to 27%
 
2012-10-25 11:14:29 AM

uber humper: What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?


Can't get to brewing yeast sites here at work (filtered connections). But if you go to "white labs" I think they have a section of high tolerance yeasts that will tell you what they're good up to. There's a Belgian yeast I've used to create some really nice strong darks (quads) slightly over 12% that had no troubles.
 
2012-10-25 11:14:41 AM

uber humper: jshine: Corvus: jshine: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.

which has been used for 100 years to make Eisbocks. Yes in a way it's distilling but it's not some sort of crazy new trick for beers.

...sure, but what makes a high ABV impressive in beer is that it occurs by natural fermentation. Once you start applying technology to concentrate the alcohol, there's really no trick whatsoever to making the ABV as high as you please. At that point, 65% becomes about as impressive as 3% -- or 99%. All are quite possible with the right methods (though distilling past the azeotrope would require methods beyond simple distillation).

/chemical engineer

What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?


I don't know what the record is off the top of my head, but its an area of active research (due largely to bio-ethanol fuel production -- the stronger the initial "brew", the less energy has to be put into distillation later on, making the whole process more economical).

Are there yeasts that can go past 15% ABV? Oh yes, but fermentation probably gets much slower as ABV gets higher. Also, whether or not such yeasts are commercial available (or are "trade secrets") is also questionable.
 
2012-10-25 11:15:23 AM

WinoRhino: uber humper: What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?

Can't get to brewing yeast sites here at work (filtered connections). But if you go to "white labs" I think they have a section of high tolerance yeasts that will tell you what they're good up to. There's a Belgian yeast I've used to create some really nice strong darks (quads) slightly over 12% that had no troubles.


White labs is cool they have their own tasting room too so you can try beers made with different yeast.
 
2012-10-25 11:16:46 AM

Corvus: how much water you extract from a mash


You wouldn't extract the water from the mash in this case. Not even the wort. You're extracting it from the fermented beer and essentially making a concentrate.Just keep freezing and removing ice until all you're left with is grain flavored ethanol and some water to dilute.
 
2012-10-25 11:17:28 AM

Corvus: White labs is cool they have their own tasting room too so you can try beers made with different yeast.


Nice! I' had no idea you could actually go there.
 
2012-10-25 11:20:25 AM

uber humper: Fuggin Bizzy: I really like Corona. You've probably heard of it - it's readily available everywhere.

Yea, isn't that the stuff that comes out of my kitchen faucet?


Ooh! Corona comes out your kitchen faucet? Can I hang out at your place?

;-)
 
2012-10-25 11:21:25 AM

Corvus: uber humper: What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?

Samuel Adams has one that can go to 27%


Wow.

Can also go up to 27%

s3-ec.buzzfed.com
 
2012-10-25 11:27:33 AM

Corvus: If you have a method that you can turn a dial and set how much water you extract from a mash without extracting the other elements in one simple process please tell me because you would make millions in distilling.


There *is* a method where you can just "turn a dial" and adjust the separation -- its the number of trays ("equilibrium stages") you put in your column. ...but its not my method -- its been well known to chemical engineers for a century.

upload.wikimedia.org

Here's how you can design your distillation process to calculate how many plates you need for a desired product purity (given a particular input purity).

/...unfortunately, I'm not making millions, but doing ok nevertheless
//this probably would seem almost "magical" compared to the kind of things that are used in some back-woods still, but to industry its old news
 
2012-10-25 11:28:30 AM
WinoRhino


karnal: Hey - don't get me wrong. I am glad there are watered down beers out there for you girls. Drink up, Missy.

Heh. You're not only clever, you're obviously really knowledgeable! Tell us more about things you like and don't like.



Yikes....I obviously hit a nerve. I am sorry. And in the spirt of this thread, Brost...from me to you:


nola.eater.com
 
2012-10-25 11:32:55 AM

Corvus: calm like a bomb: The few times I've looked for 120min, I couldn't find it. I'm not that big on IPAs, so it hasn't really been a quest for me. Also, ditto Utopias- asked for it for Christmas last year, none could be found.

120 min is very hard to find. Utopias shouldn't be that bad. They should have it (or can get it) at a high end liquor store or bottle store that knows anything craft beer.


It is? I've had five myself this year (I don't get them often as they are $10/each), Chicagoland area.
 
2012-10-25 11:34:12 AM

hobnail: Well, subby, it doesn't really matter how strong it is, if it hasn't had any contact with oak. Whisky is clearly defined as having to be stored in some sort of oak container-- in Scotland the requirement is 3 years minimum, whereas the US allows a "touch-and-go" to be called whisky, although not straight whisky.

Sounds like it's not really beer, either. But it sure as hell ain't whisky.


Begs to differ

oi50.tinypic.com

oi46.tinypic.com

/legal in Tennessee
//better than any of that aged crap
 
2012-10-25 11:37:25 AM

stovepipe: /legal in Tennessee
//better than any of that aged crap


What makes it better than aged? More of a "throat hit?"
 
2012-10-25 11:37:58 AM
Speaking of high proof beer, anyone ever tried Utopia?

i.huffpost.com
 
2012-10-25 11:39:23 AM

karnal: Yikes....I obviously hit a nerve.


"Chick light?" I'll have to give that a shot. I hope the widdle bubbles don't sting my tongue like Bud Light always does!
 
2012-10-25 11:43:05 AM

WinoRhino: karnal: Yikes....I obviously hit a nerve.

"Chick light?" I'll have to give that a shot. I hope the widdle bubbles don't sting my tongue like Bud Light always does!


Maybe you can answer this for me: I once heard that Champagne has smaller bubbles than other sparkling wine. If that's true, why is it? It's possible to engineer smaller bubbles?
 
2012-10-25 11:44:53 AM

stovepipe: hobnail: Well, subby, it doesn't really matter how strong it is, if it hasn't had any contact with oak. Whisky is clearly defined as having to be stored in some sort of oak container-- in Scotland the requirement is 3 years minimum, whereas the US allows a "touch-and-go" to be called whisky, although not straight whisky.

Sounds like it's not really beer, either. But it sure as hell ain't whisky.

Begs to differ


Marin "Popcorn" Sutton RIP. If you haven't read it, "Chasing the White Dog" by Max Watman has a chapter dedicated to his life and complicated public image.

/legal in Tennessee
//better than any of that aged crap

Young corn and rye whiskey is available in MD/VA too as long as it's legally distilled. Some of it is really strong (120+ proof). Knocks you back the first time if you're not used to it. Haven't seen Sutton's brand since many stores just stock the local VA stuff.

/first reaction: tastes like burning!
 
2012-10-25 11:45:46 AM

PsyLord: Speaking of high proof beer, anyone ever tried Utopia?


I haven't yet. I almost dropped the cash on a bottle when I saw it at the store, but I just can't do it. Back in the day, Sam Adams used to make a Triple Bock... not sure they do any longer. It came in a small blue bottle:

2.bp.blogspot.com

It was pretty good and I'd get it once in a while. I think they just carried that same principal forward so it would be similar, only more-so. I just don't think it would be worth the price. I find a lot of "celebrity beers" aren't. I think the only one I've had that lives up to the hype so far is Westvleteren 12. But if someone else buys a Utopia, there's no way I'd turn down a sample.
 
2012-10-25 11:52:31 AM

uber humper: Maybe you can answer this for me: I once heard that Champagne has smaller bubbles than other sparkling wine. If that's true, why is it? It's possible to engineer smaller bubbles?


Definitely asking the wrong guy. Unlike what my name implies, I'm not into wine. But I can tell you that the longer you let beer condition in the bottle for carbonation the finer the bubbles will be. Don't quote me, but I believe it has to do with the density of dissolved CO2. More time, more CO2, leading to smaller bubbles because more air comes out of solution when the pressure is released.
 
2012-10-25 11:55:58 AM

WinoRhino: uber humper: Maybe you can answer this for me: I once heard that Champagne has smaller bubbles than other sparkling wine. If that's true, why is it? It's possible to engineer smaller bubbles?

Definitely asking the wrong guy. Unlike what my name implies, I'm not into wine. But I can tell you that the longer you let beer condition in the bottle for carbonation the finer the bubbles will be. Don't quote me, but I believe it has to do with the density of dissolved CO2. More time, more CO2, leading to smaller bubbles because more air comes out of solution when the pressure is released.


That's what I was looking for. Beer or wine, the chemistry ~ is the same.

Maybe only for beer that has yeast in the bottle?
 
2012-10-25 11:57:22 AM
WinoRhino

uber humper: Maybe you can answer this for me: I once heard that Champagne has smaller bubbles than other sparkling wine. If that's true, why is it? It's possible to engineer smaller bubbles?

Definitely asking the wrong guy. Unlike what my name implies, I'm not into wine. But I can tell you that the longer you let beer condition in the bottle for carbonation the finer the bubbles will be. Don't quote me, but I believe it has to do with the density of dissolved CO2. More time, more CO2, leading to smaller bubbles because more air comes out of solution when the pressure is released.


This is interesting ------------------------->Link
 
2012-10-25 12:05:30 PM

Corvus: Private_Citizen: /I'm partial to Elijah Craig 18yo, but it's sold out world wide right now. I do have some barrel strength I bought when I was at HH.

How do you prefer to drink that?

Normally I do neat or maybe a few drops of "branch"

This is one of my favs:


Auchentoshan Three Wood

So is this:
 
Yamazaki These Japanese Whisky is done like a scotch.


I like a pc of ice, but every once in a while, I drink it neat. BTW, the abomination in TFA has almost the same ABV as barrel strength Bourbon. I've drank (sipped) barrel strength neat, and it's good that way, but you do "feel the burn".

I'll probably hunt down your Japanese recommendation - I've been hearing for years about them trying to replicate Scotch, so I want to see (taste) the results.
 
2012-10-25 12:05:32 PM

WinoRhino: Corvus: how much water you extract from a mash

You wouldn't extract the water from the mash in this case. Not even the wort. You're extracting it from the fermented beer and essentially making a concentrate.Just keep freezing and removing ice until all you're left with is grain flavored ethanol and some water to dilute.


Right. Which is not just simple easy, which is actually a process that is not trivial. No there are other things then water and ethanol in that, you saying that really shows a lack of understanding of the process.
 
2012-10-25 12:06:10 PM
Anybody know where a fella can buy this Armageddon without ordering it for delivery? I'd like to walk into a liquor store and buy it.
 
2012-10-25 12:06:22 PM

Rufus Lee King: [www.antiquetrader.com image 287x378]


Okay. I laughed really hard.

Thank you
 
2012-10-25 12:07:20 PM

karnal: This is interesting ------------------------->Link


uber humper: Maybe only for beer that has yeast in the bottle?


Have a look at Karnal's link above. Turns out it's exactly the opposite of what I proposed. Less CO2 = fine bubbles. But they suggest lowering the priming sugar to achieve this, and I guess time has no real effect. Interesting stuff.
 
2012-10-25 12:07:34 PM

WinoRhino: Corvus: White labs is cool they have their own tasting room too so you can try beers made with different yeast.

Nice! I' had no idea you could actually go there.


Yes. you can peak into their labs, they have books you can buy about fermentation etc., it's also real pretty with nice dark word grain and tap handles made from yeast vials.
 
2012-10-25 12:10:29 PM

karnal: WinoRhino

uber humper: Maybe you can answer this for me: I once heard that Champagne has smaller bubbles than other sparkling wine. If that's true, why is it? It's possible to engineer smaller bubbles?

Definitely asking the wrong guy. Unlike what my name implies, I'm not into wine. But I can tell you that the longer you let beer condition in the bottle for carbonation the finer the bubbles will be. Don't quote me, but I believe it has to do with the density of dissolved CO2. More time, more CO2, leading to smaller bubbles because more air comes out of solution when the pressure is released.

This is interesting ------------------------->Link


Yea it is. Less sugar, smaller bubbles. So, extra brut has smaller bubbles than brut.

/not to many Champagne threads on Fark...
 
2012-10-25 12:10:59 PM

Private_Citizen: I'll probably hunt down your Japanese recommendation - I've been hearing for years about them trying to replicate Scotch, so I want to see (taste) the results.


Why I love it is it's both flavorful and complex yet very approachable. I have given it to both people into scotch and people not into scotch and both love it. Which is usually rare.
 
2012-10-25 12:11:46 PM

Corvus: Right. Which is not just simple easy, which is actually a process that is not trivial. No there are other things then water and ethanol in that, you saying that really shows a lack of understanding of the process.


Now, now... I was just noting it wasn't being done during the mash, and I wasn't trying to call you out on anything. And you're right, I don't understand the process-- I haven't done an Eisbock before or distillation ever.
 
2012-10-25 12:19:02 PM

WinoRhino: Corvus: Right. Which is not just simple easy, which is actually a process that is not trivial. No there are other things then water and ethanol in that, you saying that really shows a lack of understanding of the process.

Now, now... I was just noting it wasn't being done during the mash, and I wasn't trying to call you out on anything. And you're right, I don't understand the process-- I haven't done an Eisbock before or distillation ever.


In distillation in you need to cut the "foreshots" which is the methanol and other impurities. In beer you don't care about removing it. Which might be bad for some of these high alcohol beers like this one because these would concentrate. So there are a lot of different things going on. And the problem is these boiling points/freezing points are not exact, they bleed over each other. Which is why often people need to distill multiple times. If it was clear cut they could just do it once.

My point is it's a bit trickier than you might think at least to come up with a quality product because there is some art to where these cuts are made and even how exacting your process is just like in fermentation.
 
2012-10-25 12:33:25 PM

WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!


You can't choose a good craft beer from the extensive choices, so you say fark it and drink swill instead? Worst decision I've ever heard.

Good on you for homebrewing though.
 
2012-10-25 12:40:19 PM

spacelord321: WhippingBoy: mortimer_ford: WhippingBoy: I used to be in to craft beer. But now, things have gotten so "extreme" it's absolutely absurd, so I've stopped supporting craft breweries.

- If I want a good beer, I'll make it myself
- If I buy beer, from now on it's PBR or Old Milwaukee (or the cheapest macro brew then have on tap)

/way to ruin it for everyone, jerks!

There's still good micro brews out there. Just stay away from the stuff named after sexual innuendos.

I realize that there's excellent micros out there. I just refuse to support an industry that's in the process of switching from making good beer to making gimmicks or yet another IPA. Where before it was quality, now marketing and bullshiat are now starting to dominate the craft beer industry.

Farking hipsters ruin everything.


Breweries make those beers because people buy them.

And i wouldn't neccesarily blame the hipsters. The craft segment as a whole is surging. And whenever there is a buck to be made, people are going to jump on the band wagon.

I see the current trend going like it did before. About five years of excitment, you get a bunch of marketing folks jumping in the biz, a lot of ,mediocre beer with funny names hitting the market. General consumer backlash and everything calming down again, with a few good brands surviving the cull

Is this a repeat of 1998? Time will tell.

Btw, I just sent our first shipment of Legend to Maryland. We will innitially be available in the greater Baltimore metro area.
Prost!
 
2012-10-25 12:43:10 PM

stovepipe: hobnail: Well, subby, it doesn't really matter how strong it is, if it hasn't had any contact with oak. Whisky is clearly defined as having to be stored in some sort of oak container-- in Scotland the requirement is 3 years minimum, whereas the US allows a "touch-and-go" to be called whisky, although not straight whisky.

Sounds like it's not really beer, either. But it sure as hell ain't whisky.

Begs to differ

[oi50.tinypic.com image 400x266]

[oi46.tinypic.com image 300x169]

/legal in Tennessee
//better than any of that aged crap


Corn whiskey, which I assume that shiat to be, is the exception to the aging rule. Corn whiskey must be distilled from a mash of at least 80% corn and if aged at all, must be stored in used barrels or uncharred new barrels.

Further reading on standards of identity
 
2012-10-25 01:14:47 PM
I have drank a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin (TNP). Not really enjoyable. Being freeze distilled it doesn't clean up like standard distilled spirits do. If anyone remembers, there was a scotch named Loch Du. Super smokey, it was called the bongwater of scotch. I enjoyed Lock Du mixed with soda water. I did not enjoy TNP.

I have a bottle of Sink the Bismark in the back closet. I doubt it is aging much. Maybe some oxidation will help.

Current favorite beer is Little Sumthin' Wild. I wish Lagunitas would convert it to unlimited release liek Little Sumthin' Sumthin'.
 
2012-10-25 01:42:32 PM

jshine: uber humper: jshine: Corvus: jshine: calm like a bomb: Freeze fermenting? Bullshiat. It isn't beer.

Yea, they just substituted distillation for an alternate process that achieves the same thing.

which has been used for 100 years to make Eisbocks. Yes in a way it's distilling but it's not some sort of crazy new trick for beers.

...sure, but what makes a high ABV impressive in beer is that it occurs by natural fermentation. Once you start applying technology to concentrate the alcohol, there's really no trick whatsoever to making the ABV as high as you please. At that point, 65% becomes about as impressive as 3% -- or 99%. All are quite possible with the right methods (though distilling past the azeotrope would require methods beyond simple distillation).

/chemical engineer

What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?

I don't know what the record is off the top of my head, but its an area of active research (due largely to bio-ethanol fuel production -- the stronger the initial "brew", the less energy has to be put into distillation later on, making the whole process more economical).

Are there yeasts that can go past 15% ABV? Oh yes, but fermentation probably gets much slower as ABV gets higher. Also, whether or not such yeasts are commercial available (or are "trade secrets") is also questionable.


I don't know about that. A lot of the high gravity brews I can think of are bottle conditioned, in which case you can often culture the yeast right out of the bottle you buy.
 
2012-10-25 01:46:50 PM
Be careful with that though. Sometimes the bottle yeast is not the same as the tank yeast.
 
2012-10-25 01:50:00 PM

uber humper: This is to beer what cognac is to Champagne. Or brandy to wine....


Congac is to brandy what scotch is to whisky.
 
2012-10-25 02:18:19 PM

WinoRhino: uber humper: What's the heartiest yeast? Is there one that can survive past 15% ABV or so?

Can't get to brewing yeast sites here at work (filtered connections). But if you go to "white labs" I think they have a section of high tolerance yeasts that will tell you what they're good up to. There's a Belgian yeast I've used to create some really nice strong darks (quads) slightly over 12% that had no troubles.


I've used the Chimay strain (WLP500) to ferment my Quad to 14%. Lots of invert sugar and a prolonged beta amylase rest helps lower the FG and a relatively hot ferment towards the end.
 
2012-10-25 02:32:48 PM
Armageddon!

/can't believe this hasn't been posted yet
 
2012-10-25 02:49:34 PM

Victoly: uber humper: This is to beer what cognac is to Champagne. Or brandy to wine....

Congac is to brandy what scotch is to whisky.


Overpriced, overhyped mediocrity? Sounds about right.
 
2012-10-25 02:57:01 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Be careful with that though. Sometimes the bottle yeast is not the same as the tank yeast.


Tanks for the tip.
 
2012-10-25 03:16:06 PM

Mose: Cerebral Knievel: Be careful with that though. Sometimes the bottle yeast is not the same as the tank yeast.

Tanks for the tip.


Absolutely,
now that i'm on my laptop and off my phone,

one of the biggest reasons some folks do that is to protect the house yeast from competitors. It must also be considered that if it's from an import it most likely was pasteurized before it was exported I know that used to be a regulation, not sure anymore though, but if it was, anything in the bottle very well be dead.

I can tell you the way we handle our cask beers and unfiltered package.. the package is run through a centrifuge to remove 85% of the solids, and the casks are poured directly from the tanks and then krausened, about 8-10 ounces of actively fermenting beer per 10.8 gallons of crashed beer from the tank. So it is very possible to propagate off our stuff.
 
2012-10-25 03:18:57 PM
How can they call Sam Adams a craft beer? (In the accompanying slide show.) It's the biggest American owned brewery in the world.
 
2012-10-25 03:19:17 PM
Cerebral Knievel:

Speaking of your 'fuge, how's that treating you now that you've been putting it to use for a while longer? Still loving it?
 
2012-10-25 03:30:35 PM

uglyonef: How can they call Sam Adams a craft beer? (In the accompanying slide show.) It's the biggest American owned brewery in the world.


cause it's nawt bud
 
2012-10-25 03:30:59 PM
damn no edit button...

All the yeasts we use are commercially available to the homebrewers market, it's only our two house strains that are licensed only to us for commercial use.


and to the overall discusion about Ice distilling? I wouldn't consider the end product to be a spirit over a beer, but it most certainly is cheating IMHO Eisbocks are a recognized style, we have made them before, and the state makes no restrictions on our license to use the method.
you can concentrate it all you want, you just can't vaporize it, at that point you are making a whole new thing. it takes more specialized equipment different licensing and certainly different methods of Handling and cellarmanship.

but, once again, yes, it's a gimmick, at least how and why they are doing it. in my opinion at least. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should, and if you are, it's done for the purpose of marketing the rest of your lineup, and if that's all you got going on with your line up? then I just don't think it's a sound business model.
 
2012-10-25 03:37:15 PM
whiskey is mighty risky
stick with beer engineering

i.ytimg.com
 
2012-10-25 03:44:50 PM

Bruxellensis: Cerebral Knievel:

Speaking of your 'fuge, how's that treating you now that you've been putting it to use for a while longer? Still loving it?


its... friggen... AWESOME!

we bring the beer in from the fermenter, spin it out till it's 90% clear to a holding tank, then take it from there through the final polish, with the plates, for draft, or sanitary. in the final brite tank.

added a couple of steps, but it cuts the time down to do it by way more than half. It only takes an hour to fuge a tank, and about an hour and a half for the final prep transfer

using just the pad filter took 3 hours on a good day, 9 on a bad, with the pads only good for about 30-70bbls before they needed to be changed. depending on the beer and crash time.

with the fuge, 3 hours max for the whole mess, and the life of the pads has now gone up to an average of 90bbls, with 120 being nominal. those pads cost about $1.50 each and the frame takes 60 of them.
so there is a lot of savings right there.

and now with our winter season hitting the streets, a Belgian style wit, it gets to skip the pads completely and I can have 120bbls available for the bottling tanks in about 6 hours. where as before that would have been a 30/70 blend of unfiltered to filtered, that would've taken four days prior.

yeah, we are enjoying it, I think we will keep it.

we are selling off all our 20bbl tanks for 30bbl tanks, so if you know anyone in the market for one, I think we are letting them go for $7000 a pop, less if you are buying more than one of course... bulk rates apply.
 
2012-10-25 03:46:00 PM

WinoRhino: karnal: You must be a girl?

I've been brewing for almost 20 years. I've traveled to Germany, Belgium, UK, Czech Republic, and had a lot of fine brews. I've had plenty of the celebrity beers that are quite popular now as well such as Heady Topper, Pliny, Kate the Great, Westy 12, and next weekend I will be at Ebeneezer's in Maine to have some Black Albert. And I like Corona. Not only that, but Corona Light with a lime in it.


That was a masterful troll. It might be true, but as trolling goes, this exchange is easily a 10/10.
 
2012-10-25 03:55:26 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Bruxellensis: Cerebral Knievel:

Speaking of your 'fuge, how's that treating you now that you've been putting it to use for a while longer? Still loving it?

its... friggen... AWESOME!

we bring the beer in from the fermenter, spin it out till it's 90% clear to a holding tank, then take it from there through the final polish, with the plates, for draft, or sanitary. in the final brite tank.

added a couple of steps, but it cuts the time down to do it by way more than half. It only takes an hour to fuge a tank, and about an hour and a half for the final prep transfer

using just the pad filter took 3 hours on a good day, 9 on a bad, with the pads only good for about 30-70bbls before they needed to be changed. depending on the beer and crash time.

with the fuge, 3 hours max for the whole mess, and the life of the pads has now gone up to an average of 90bbls, with 120 being nominal. those pads cost about $1.50 each and the frame takes 60 of them.
so there is a lot of savings right there.

and now with our winter season hitting the streets, a Belgian style wit, it gets to skip the pads completely and I can have 120bbls available for the bottling tanks in about 6 hours. where as before that would have been a 30/70 blend of unfiltered to filtered, that would've taken four days prior.

yeah, we are enjoying it, I think we will keep it.

we are selling off all our 20bbl tanks for 30bbl tanks, so if you know anyone in the market for one, I think we are letting them go for $7000 a pop, less if you are buying more than one of course... bulk rates apply.


Awesome. Purely awesome. I'm going to pitch the idea to my friends at one of the local breweries (the one where I used to work). They have stepped up their production quite a bit in the last couple years, including several 100BBL fermenters and brite tanks. Still, it seems that the pad filtering system is their bottleneck, other than the bottling/canning process, of course.

Also, I wish I could take those 20BBL guys from ya. I'm a bit short on cash. ...and space, and utilities...and...

I know another brewer who's looking for some used 7BBL fermenters, maybe 2 or 3. He doesn't have the capacity for 20BBL tanks though.

Cheers!
 
2012-10-25 04:18:39 PM

foxyshadis: That was a masterful troll. It might be true, but as trolling goes, this exchange is easily a 10/10.


You've got some low standards and aren't sure what trolling looks like, I think.
 
2012-10-25 04:23:30 PM

Bruxellensis:

Awesome. Purely awesome. I'm going to pitch the idea to my friends at one of the local breweries (the one where I used to work). They have stepped up their production quite a bit in the last couple years, including several 100BBL fermenters and brite tanks. Still, it seems that the pad filtering system is their bottleneck, other than the bottling/canning process, of course.

the next experiment with the 'fuge is to put a buffer tank between the fuge and the polishing filter so it can all be run right in line instead of running to a holding tank first.. direct out put from the fuge is too fast and turbulant. we are going to use one of the old 8bbl bright tanks for that, I'll let you know how it works out.

as for the guy looking for 7bbl FV's? all the 20bbl tanks we have are left over from when we were running a 10bbl brewhouse, and needed tank space, so two runs, filled one tank, now that we use a 30bbl house, one run has to be split between two tanks, so upgrading to 30bbl tanks doubles capacity for the same floor space.

so if tank space is that guys concern? then he might want to think about it.
 
2012-10-25 05:02:16 PM

McGrits:

I have a bottle of Sink the Bismark in the back closet. I doubt it is aging much. Maybe some oxidation will help..



I opened my bottle of Sink the Bismark and was very disappointed. I just can't find any redeeming qualities about the beer. Especially for the price I paid.

Utopias however, is an amazing beer that I strongly recommend. Brewed by the Boston Beer Company, 30% ABV using natural fermentation. I had it at my wedding in place of champagne. Awesome brew.
 
2012-10-25 05:28:05 PM

Cerebral Knievel: Bruxellensis:

Awesome. Purely awesome. I'm going to pitch the idea to my friends at one of the local breweries (the one where I used to work). They have stepped up their production quite a bit in the last couple years, including several 100BBL fermenters and brite tanks. Still, it seems that the pad filtering system is their bottleneck, other than the bottling/canning process, of course.

the next experiment with the 'fuge is to put a buffer tank between the fuge and the polishing filter so it can all be run right in line instead of running to a holding tank first.. direct out put from the fuge is too fast and turbulant. we are going to use one of the old 8bbl bright tanks for that, I'll let you know how it works out.

as for the guy looking for 7bbl FV's? all the 20bbl tanks we have are left over from when we were running a 10bbl brewhouse, and needed tank space, so two runs, filled one tank, now that we use a 30bbl house, one run has to be split between two tanks, so upgrading to 30bbl tanks doubles capacity for the same floor space.

so if tank space is that guys concern? then he might want to think about it.


Makes sense, but his constraint is more of an issue of floor space and product demand. This particular brewery is a small brew pub. They like to have a wide variety of beers on tap, but they don't go through them all that fast. So, brewing several different 7BBL batches makes sense for their M.O. They currently have three tanks, but it sounds like they can fit five in the space they have. Or at least they want to fit five. It looks pretty tight in there right now if you ask me.

/he makes GREAT beer - tought me a lot of what I know
 
2012-10-25 05:29:36 PM

Avonmore: I had it at my wedding in place of champagne


Cool!
 
2012-10-25 05:49:56 PM

Bruxellensis: Cerebral Knievel: Bruxellensis:

Awesome. Purely awesome. I'm going to pitch the idea to my friends at one of the local breweries (the one where I used to work). They have stepped up their production quite a bit in the last couple years, including several 100BBL fermenters and brite tanks. Still, it seems that the pad filtering system is their bottleneck, other than the bottling/canning process, of course.

the next experiment with the 'fuge is to put a buffer tank between the fuge and the polishing filter so it can all be run right in line instead of running to a holding tank first.. direct out put from the fuge is too fast and turbulant. we are going to use one of the old 8bbl bright tanks for that, I'll let you know how it works out.

as for the guy looking for 7bbl FV's? all the 20bbl tanks we have are left over from when we were running a 10bbl brewhouse, and needed tank space, so two runs, filled one tank, now that we use a 30bbl house, one run has to be split between two tanks, so upgrading to 30bbl tanks doubles capacity for the same floor space.

so if tank space is that guys concern? then he might want to think about it.

Makes sense, but his constraint is more of an issue of floor space and product demand. This particular brewery is a small brew pub. They like to have a wide variety of beers on tap, but they don't go through them all that fast. So, brewing several different 7BBL batches makes sense for their M.O. They currently have three tanks, but it sounds like they can fit five in the space they have. Or at least they want to fit five. It looks pretty tight in there right now if you ask me.

/he makes GREAT beer - tought me a lot of what I know


Ahhh... that makes sense as well... well, lets look at it this way.... and I aint trying to sell these old tanks, I'm just talking beer here.. if the guy has one particular beer, a flagship if you will, the house beer that he sells a lot of, he may do well to get a double batch sized tank to handle that load, and then use his existing tanks for the specialties and seasonals. .

when I grow up, I want to be a consultant :D

which reminds me, I need to drop my cousin down in Florida a line about that thing and the stuff.


BTW, when I got married, we held the reception here at the pub and I made a braggot out of my step dads honey and the wort from our golden Ale for the toast.. only a five gallon batch HB sized batch and we ran right through it.
 
2012-10-25 05:52:09 PM
damn nonexistant edit button...

dude could probably save a lot of money by getting one double sized tank to handle the flagship load, instead of purchasing a bunch of smaller tanks,
 
2012-10-25 06:10:33 PM
HA!!! I have ancestors from Fraserburgh!
 
2012-10-26 10:27:33 AM

Cerebral Knievel: damn nonexistant edit button...

dude could probably save a lot of money by getting one double sized tank to handle the flagship load, instead of purchasing a bunch of smaller tanks,


I don't know what his sales volumes are per style, but I do know some sell more than others. I'm not sure if he has one flagship that he could make use of a larger FV. I'm sure he's put thought into this, since he's been planning and looking for over a year now. I'll talk to him about it and see what his plan is specifically.

Brew on!
 
2012-10-26 04:21:24 PM

Bruxellensis: Cerebral Knievel: damn nonexistant edit button...

dude could probably save a lot of money by getting one double sized tank to handle the flagship load, instead of purchasing a bunch of smaller tanks,

I don't know what his sales volumes are per style, but I do know some sell more than others. I'm not sure if he has one flagship that he could make use of a larger FV. I'm sure he's put thought into this, since he's been planning and looking for over a year now. I'll talk to him about it and see what his plan is specifically.

Brew on!


once again, not trying to sell stuff, but.... we do have this one tank that we could probably make a really sweet deal on. it has an internal outward dent. more of a hump really. If I remember the history of this tank correctly, a naughty cellar man of years gone by let the tank pull a vacuum and it did not have a push pull relief valve in place at the time. the tank was repaired, and the deflection is not severe enough to cause any inaccuracies in level readings. and it has served us well for 15+ years with out any issues.
but because it does have that bit of damage, we are looking to let that go for under $3k

as far as i can tell, tanks, once they get to a certain size, start going for a grand a bbl.
 
2012-10-26 05:42:58 PM
Cerebral Knievel:

You know what, I'll let him know that there's a slightly dented FV available on the cheap. Was that a 20BBL? If he's interested, how should I contact you? I also check the email in my profile about once a month.

$1k/BBL sounds about right for brand new SS with sanitary welds. Makes the used/scratch/dent market look more appealing.
 
2012-10-26 06:23:17 PM

Bruxellensis: Cerebral Knievel:

You know what, I'll let him know that there's a slightly dented FV available on the cheap. Was that a 20BBL? If he's interested, how should I contact you? I also check the email in my profile about once a month.

$1k/BBL sounds about right for brand new SS with sanitary welds. Makes the used/scratch/dent market look more appealing.


just updated my profile to reflect my profesional Email address.goes right to my phone. you know which parts to remove to make it work.

talking to the guy who is actually in charge of selling these things, they are rated 15bbls, 20 total. $5k upickitup. but it's still a $20k tank. if dude is interested, I'll put him in touch with the other guy
 
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