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7279 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Oct 2012 at 9:41 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-24 02:12:11 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: drjekel_mrhyde: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: Have you seen this with anything besides bullshiat software like office? Can you point me to something showing Surface Pro running Civil 3d, or maybe full fledge cs6? Until I can see something besides "on paper" claims I will stick to Splashtop from galaxy note and iPad. At least with a $10 app I can play my precious Diablo 3, and remotely do whatever the hell I want on my big arse energy sucking gaming rig wherever I am with an Internet connection.

/prove me wrong
//I will preorder one ASAP

If your current programs run on Window 7 then it can run on the Pro. Link

that's a link to "on paper". I want to see ms surface pro running 3rd party windows 7/8 software. I want to believe the "magic". I want a hand held device that runs everything that my bug rig pc does, within the tablets means.

I want hard proof of someone installing any .exe downloaded off the web. I find it more along the lines of "magic" that MS is going to actually put a full blown Windows handheld PC in our hands this month.

I'll give you my gaming rig if it happens.



There is noting theoretical about it. A Surface Pro is essentially an Ultrabook shoehorned into a tablet form factor, with a low voltage Intel Core i5 Processor with Intel HD Graphics 4000 running everything. From the perspective of the software, it is no different than any other Win 8 computer. Your only limitation with running high powered apps is going to be RAM, which will not be upgradeable, and the mediocre GPU. Nothing in the Surface will prevent any app certified to run on Win 8 from working normally.
 
2012-10-24 02:13:20 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: that's a link to "on paper". I want to see ms surface pro running 3rd party windows 7/8 software. I want to believe the "magic". I want a hand held device that runs everything that my bug rig pc does, within the tablets means.

I want hard proof of someone installing any .exe downloaded off the web. I find it more along the lines of "magic" that MS is going to actually put a full blown Windows handheld PC in our hands this month.

I'll give you my gaming rig if it happens.

Installed the same OS that's going on the Surface Pro (the x86 version of Windows 8 Pro) onto my convertible tablet PC. Adobe CS6 works fine (that's what I edited the photo with), and the Autodesk Suite works fine too.

[sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net image 600x397] 
/have my 64-gig Surface RT being delivered on Friday


What CPU is your convertible running? specs? Im curious as if it comes close to the surface devices. I mean I can instal Mac OSx on intel pc, and with a little elbow grease AMD pc, but it doesn't mean graphics intensive software won't ru like syrup.

Installing an x86 OS on your net book does not equal to what MS is promising with the surface.

Why would you get the RT version seeing how it won't run CS6 or Autodesk suite.

You like windows so much so you got windows for your windows that isn't really windows?

/maybe too much vodka and Diet dew for me
//my geekpeen is bigger
 
2012-10-24 02:19:13 AM

farkeruk: jayhawk88: But everyone is losing their shiat over the new iMac, because it's so thin. You know, because all the countless hours you looked at your computer from the side have really taken their toll.

THIS

Thinner desktop PCs are a bad thing, because it means that more and more of it is wired to the motherboard, for little gain. I can't dig all-in-one PCs at all. I've got a space under my desk where a tower can happily live and I get lower maintenance costs.


The only real advantage I see is that probably lowers the weight of the 27" enough that you might not need a super beefy monitor arm for it. Otherwise, thin isn't really an advantage for a desktop.
 
2012-10-24 02:24:31 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: that's a link to "on paper". I want to see ms surface pro running 3rd party windows 7/8 software. I want to believe the "magic". I want a hand held device that runs everything that my bug rig pc does, within the tablets means.

I want hard proof of someone installing any .exe downloaded off the web. I find it more along the lines of "magic" that MS is going to actually put a full blown Windows handheld PC in our hands this month.

I'll give you my gaming rig if it happens.

Installed the same OS that's going on the Surface Pro (the x86 version of Windows 8 Pro) onto my convertible tablet PC. Adobe CS6 works fine (that's what I edited the photo with), and the Autodesk Suite works fine too.

[sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net image 600x397] 
/have my 64-gig Surface RT being delivered on Friday


On the other hand, The Microsoft Surface Pro will run Windows 8, and will run on an Intel chip. Because of the Intel chip, it would be able to run legacy Windows applications as well. The Surface Pro is intended to have capabilities parallel to ultrabooks in the market currently.

Running Autocad on a ultra book is like trying to fark your wife while she is out shopping. Sounds good but it will just be a mess in your hands.

Autocad on anything but a discrete GPU is Futile.


/work pc is a dual Xeon 3ghz (8 cores total) - 8gb ram - nvidia quadro fx 3800
//home pc AMD Athlon II 3ghz - 16gb ram - nvidia GeForce 460 1gb
///$2000 laptops can't hang and a MS tablet won't either
//// I want to believe
//lots O slashies
 
2012-10-24 02:26:07 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: What CPU is your convertible running? specs? Im curious as if it comes close to the surface devices. I mean I can instal Mac OSx on intel pc, and with a little elbow grease AMD pc, but it doesn't mean graphics intensive software won't ru like syrup.

Installing an x86 OS on your net book does not equal to what MS is promising with the surface.

Why would you get the RT version seeing how it won't run CS6 or Autodesk suite.

You like windows so much so you got windows for your windows that isn't really windows?


It's one of the last gen Toshiba Portege convertible tablets, an M780: running a Core i7 M620 @ 2.67GHz, 6 gigs of ram, 128gig SSD, touch and pen input. Fairly similar specs to the Surface Pro, a little bit beefed up (Core i7 vs. 5, 50% more RAM) - mine has Intel's last gen's proc and integrated graphics though. It'll run all the software, but when it comes to BIM 3-D modeling, don't expect major rendering. With the core i7 proc, it holds its own on 3Ds Max 2013 though.

I bought the Surface RT for testing at work. I have a number of executive users who use their convertible laptops on the road, mainly for Office suite and OneNote work, along with combining surveys/photographs while doing ADA building inspections. I thought a 1.5 lbs Surface RT would be much easier, and more robust, than their 5lbs convertible laptops. The 10 hour battery life is much improved over their current 3-hour laptops.
 
2012-10-24 02:27:03 AM

Igor Jakovsky: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: Doc Daneeka: Amazon?

Seems like either the Nook HD (better screen, microSD), or the Nexus 7 (pure Android, more Apps, Google services) would be a better non-iPad choice.

I'd only recommend the Nook if you are going to use it primarily as a ereader. The app store selection is limited and more expensive than Amazon or Google Play.

Unless your tech savvy and install a full fledge android OS on it.

Cyangenmod FTW!!!

I dual boot ICS with WebOS on my fire sale touchpad. I rarely use the WebOS though. ICS runs smooth as silk on this thing. Cyanogenmod FTW indeed.

/I put it on myself and I'm no tech genius really. There is plenty of instruction out there. The biggest hurdle for me was not wanting to brick the tablet somehow. Once I got past that paranoia, installing android was fairly easy.
//not sure how easy it is on other devices.


Very easy if you can follow instructions and get past the paranoia. Once you get the custom recovery on there it's easy as a prom date on prom night
 
2012-10-24 02:29:36 AM

jaytkay: Ess_Aytch: Tablets are a better form factor for consuming and creating in an elementary school.

What are they "creating" on a tablet?


Have you bothered to do any research? I can draw, paint, write, all kinds of things. I can't run my rendering program, but that's what I bought my 12-core workstation for. You sound like one of those "One button mouse? Hyuk-hyuk!" idiots.
 
2012-10-24 02:37:54 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: What CPU is your convertible running? specs? Im curious as if it comes close to the surface devices. I mean I can instal Mac OSx on intel pc, and with a little elbow grease AMD pc, but it doesn't mean graphics intensive software won't ru like syrup.

Installing an x86 OS on your net book does not equal to what MS is promising with the surface.

Why would you get the RT version seeing how it won't run CS6 or Autodesk suite.

You like windows so much so you got windows for your windows that isn't really windows?

It's one of the last gen Toshiba Portege convertible tablets, an M780: running a Core i7 M620 @ 2.67GHz, 6 gigs of ram, 128gig SSD, touch and pen input. Fairly similar specs to the Surface Pro, a little bit beefed up (Core i7 vs. 5, 50% more RAM) - mine has Intel's last gen's proc and integrated graphics though. It'll run all the software, but when it comes to BIM 3-D modeling, don't expect major rendering. With the core i7 proc, it holds its own on 3Ds Max 2013 though.

I bought the Surface RT for testing at work. I have a number of executive users who use their convertible laptops on the road, mainly for Office suite and OneNote work, along with combining surveys/photographs while doing ADA building inspections. I thought a 1.5 lbs Surface RT would be much easier, and more robust, than their 5lbs convertible laptops. The 10 hour battery life is much improved over their current 3-hour laptops.


Integrated graphics and Autodesk suite does not compute.

12gigs just for installing

http://usa.autodesk.com/civil-3d/system-requirements/
 
2012-10-24 02:38:50 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: What CPU is your convertible running? specs? Im curious as if it comes close to the surface devices. I mean I can instal Mac OSx on intel pc, and with a little elbow grease AMD pc, but it doesn't mean graphics intensive software won't ru like syrup.

Installing an x86 OS on your net book does not equal to what MS is promising with the surface.


If I can run Creative Suite 6 on my work ThinkPad with an i5 and an Intel HD 3000, the Surface Pro will have no issues. Outside of Maya or a top of the line game, even cheapish hardware is more than enough to run PhotoShop and Premiere smoothly. The biggest issue with running it would be how small the UI elements would be on a 10.6" 1080p screen, although the digitizer pen will be great with PhotoShop and Illustrator.
 
2012-10-24 02:38:52 AM
Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear:

I think I was a little brief in my last post because I was on my phone.

Basically a Surface Pro is this ultrabook with 1080p.

My experience at work with getting to run what is basically an openGL based 3-d city modelling application to run is as follows. I was actually quite impressed with the intel integrated graphics, they could run small projects (e.g. not a ton of textures, not a ton of vertices) at a good frame rate, with little optimization on my part. It seems the biggest developments in the past 1-2 years is that the drivers for the integrated graphics have actually started to do what they say they do.

For example, 2-3 years ago, nearly all the intel integrated graphics claimed to support openGL up to at least 2.0. Now in practice, this wasn't actually true, and what I found is that the function calls with extensions caused it to crash (even though all of this should have been supported long ago). There's still some haziness with the VRAM vs RAM consumption as far as I can tell, but my prediction is that over the next 1-2 years the majority of top tier 3-d enterprise applications will run on integrated graphics just fine.

I digress, the point I was trying to make is about the price of the surface. I was initially very excited about it, because the idea of a tablet with greater productivity options (visual studio, other IDEs, etc) was interesting to me. Unfortunately, it looks like all that you're getting is a gimped computer with a touch screen, for what is going to be at minimum 800 dollars. For me the solution is to schlep my work laptop with me on trips for productivity, and keep a tablet for media consumption/e-mails. The surface doesn't have the juice necessary to fill my productivity needs like I hoped, and he price doesn't warrant a purchase, when my 1000 dollar work laptop has a 650m NVIDIA card with 8 gigs of RAM and an i7, which can actually run anything it needs to with no problems at all, not to mention the speed increase while compiling and running scripts is a huge difference from what the surface could give.
 
2012-10-24 02:38:54 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: /work pc is a dual Xeon 3ghz (8 cores total) - 8gb ram - nvidia quadro fx 3800
//home pc AMD Athlon II 3ghz - 16gb ram - nvidia GeForce 460 1gb
///$2000 laptops can't hang and a MS tablet won't either
//// I want to believe


You'd love our new laptops for dedicated CAD designing (just took delivery of two more today):
Dell Precision M6700
Core i7 3840qm (2.8 GHz), 16 gig DDR3 (1855MHz), 128 SATA 3 SSD, Quadro K5000M w/4 gig (1344 stream processors, 96 GB/second throughput)

At about 8 lbs though - so they're not exactly the best for taking out into the field. Their battery life is measured in minutes, not hours. And at about $5k a pop (plus about another $10k in software), I'd much rather supply a supplementary $500 Surface RT for folks on the road.
 
2012-10-24 02:40:39 AM

Ed Grubermann: jaytkay: Ess_Aytch: Tablets are a better form factor for consuming and creating in an elementary school.

What are they "creating" on a tablet?

Have you bothered to do any research? I can draw, paint, write, all kinds of things. I can't run my rendering program, but that's what I bought my 12-core workstation for. You sound like one of those "One button mouse? Hyuk-hyuk!" idiots.


I can draw, paint, write, all kinds of things on that bad boy mead notebook over there.....
 
2012-10-24 02:45:40 AM

mtb9000: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear:

I think I was a little brief in my last post because I was on my phone.

Basically a Surface Pro is this ultrabook with 1080p.

My experience at work with getting to run what is basically an openGL based 3-d city modelling application to run is as follows. I was actually quite impressed with the intel integrated graphics, they could run small projects (e.g. not a ton of textures, not a ton of vertices) at a good frame rate, with little optimization on my part. It seems the biggest developments in the past 1-2 years is that the drivers for the integrated graphics have actually started to do what they say they do.

For example, 2-3 years ago, nearly all the intel integrated graphics claimed to support openGL up to at least 2.0. Now in practice, this wasn't actually true, and what I found is that the function calls with extensions caused it to crash (even though all of this should have been supported long ago). There's still some haziness with the VRAM vs RAM consumption as far as I can tell, but my prediction is that over the next 1-2 years the majority of top tier 3-d enterprise applications will run on integrated graphics just fine.

I digress, the point I was trying to make is about the price of the surface. I was initially very excited about it, because the idea of a tablet with greater productivity options (visual studio, other IDEs, etc) was interesting to me. Unfortunately, it looks like all that you're getting is a gimped computer with a touch screen, for what is going to be at minimum 800 dollars. For me the solution is to schlep my work laptop with me on trips for productivity, and keep a tablet for media consumption/e-mails. The surface doesn't have the juice necessary to fill my productivity needs like I hoped, and he price doesn't warrant a purchase, when my 1000 dollar work laptop has a 650m NVIDIA card with 8 gigs of RAM and an i7, which can actually run anything it needs to with no problems at all, not to mention the ...


Ok I am thinking we are actually on the same page here. Intel graphics is able to run Autodesk suite but it would be like doing your m-i-l, it can be done but would it be enjoyable?
 
2012-10-24 02:46:45 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: /work pc is a dual Xeon 3ghz (8 cores total) - 8gb ram - nvidia quadro fx 3800
//home pc AMD Athlon II 3ghz - 16gb ram - nvidia GeForce 460 1gb
///$2000 laptops can't hang and a MS tablet won't either
//// I want to believe

You'd love our new laptops for dedicated CAD designing (just took delivery of two more today):
Dell Precision M6700
Core i7 3840qm (2.8 GHz), 16 gig DDR3 (1855MHz), 128 SATA 3 SSD, Quadro K5000M w/4 gig (1344 stream processors, 96 GB/second throughput)

At about 8 lbs though - so they're not exactly the best for taking out into the field. Their battery life is measured in minutes, not hours. And at about $5k a pop (plus about another $10k in software), I'd much rather supply a supplementary $500 Surface RT for folks on the road.


The Dell inspiron17R is surprisingly awesome, and only runs 1000ish. My experience with the M4000 M6000 has been pretty negative. Not because they are bad computers, but they seem to run about 2-3x what the non quadro counterpart would. However, any large business seems to choose them.

I've been seriously impressed with the 600 mobile series NVIDIA cards. I get very comparable performance to my desktops.
 
2012-10-24 02:47:59 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: /work pc is a dual Xeon 3ghz (8 cores total) - 8gb ram - nvidia quadro fx 3800
//home pc AMD Athlon II 3ghz - 16gb ram - nvidia GeForce 460 1gb
///$2000 laptops can't hang and a MS tablet won't either
//// I want to believe

You'd love our new laptops for dedicated CAD designing (just took delivery of two more today):
Dell Precision M6700
Core i7 3840qm (2.8 GHz), 16 gig DDR3 (1855MHz), 128 SATA 3 SSD, Quadro K5000M w/4 gig (1344 stream processors, 96 GB/second throughput)

At about 8 lbs though - so they're not exactly the best for taking out into the field. Their battery life is measured in minutes, not hours. And at about $5k a pop (plus about another $10k in software), I'd much rather supply a supplementary $500 Surface RT for folks on the road.


$500 surface RT will be limited to MS office and MS market apps. No legacy software for you.
 
2012-10-24 02:49:26 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: Integrated graphics and Autodesk suite does not compute.

12gigs just for installing

http://usa.autodesk.com/civil-3d/system-requirements/


Ummm, dude. When you look at the 64-bit requirements, they say Civil 3D needs 12 gigs of hard drive space, 4 gigs of ram and a P-4 processor. It doesn't even mention graphics. There's quite a bit of horsepower in a current Core i5 or i7 proc & associated graphics. More than enough to do the job. It won't have all the bells and whistles in terms of live texture modeling, but it surprisingly runs a lot of 3d programs smoothly (Sketchup, Google Earth, Revit 2013 and even 3Ds Max).

Where it starts to show its CAD limitations are on our 300+ unit projects and when it comes to final rendering. 4/8 CPU cores don't have a chance vs. 1344 CUDA GPU cores.
 
2012-10-24 02:51:00 AM

mtb9000: MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: /work pc is a dual Xeon 3ghz (8 cores total) - 8gb ram - nvidia quadro fx 3800
//home pc AMD Athlon II 3ghz - 16gb ram - nvidia GeForce 460 1gb
///$2000 laptops can't hang and a MS tablet won't either
//// I want to believe

You'd love our new laptops for dedicated CAD designing (just took delivery of two more today):
Dell Precision M6700
Core i7 3840qm (2.8 GHz), 16 gig DDR3 (1855MHz), 128 SATA 3 SSD, Quadro K5000M w/4 gig (1344 stream processors, 96 GB/second throughput)

At about 8 lbs though - so they're not exactly the best for taking out into the field. Their battery life is measured in minutes, not hours. And at about $5k a pop (plus about another $10k in software), I'd much rather supply a supplementary $500 Surface RT for folks on the road.

The Dell inspiron17R is surprisingly awesome, and only runs 1000ish. My experience with the M4000 M6000 has been pretty negative. Not because they are bad computers, but they seem to run about 2-3x what the non quadro counterpart would. However, any large business seems to choose them.

I've been seriously impressed with the 600 mobile series NVIDIA cards. I get very comparable performance to my desktops.


Nvidia mobile cards are hands down better than any integrated graphics bullshiat. I find it amazing how hard it is now days to find dedicated gpu in a laptop.

My dream laptop would be a second gen Alienware m11 with dedicated and integrated graphics. But I have heard it's heat level is on par with "ouch my balls"
 
2012-10-24 02:52:01 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: mtb9000: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear:

I think I was a little brief in my last post because I was on my phone.

Basically a Surface Pro is this ultrabook with 1080p.

My experience at work with getting to run what is basically an openGL based 3-d city modelling application to run is as follows. I was actually quite impressed with the intel integrated graphics, they could run small projects (e.g. not a ton of textures, not a ton of vertices) at a good frame rate, with little optimization on my part. It seems the biggest developments in the past 1-2 years is that the drivers for the integrated graphics have actually started to do what they say they do.

For example, 2-3 years ago, nearly all the intel integrated graphics claimed to support openGL up to at least 2.0. Now in practice, this wasn't actually true, and what I found is that the function calls with extensions caused it to crash (even though all of this should have been supported long ago). There's still some haziness with the VRAM vs RAM consumption as far as I can tell, but my prediction is that over the next 1-2 years the majority of top tier 3-d enterprise applications will run on integrated graphics just fine.

I digress, the point I was trying to make is about the price of the surface. I was initially very excited about it, because the idea of a tablet with greater productivity options (visual studio, other IDEs, etc) was interesting to me. Unfortunately, it looks like all that you're getting is a gimped computer with a touch screen, for what is going to be at minimum 800 dollars. For me the solution is to schlep my work laptop with me on trips for productivity, and keep a tablet for media consumption/e-mails. The surface doesn't have the juice necessary to fill my productivity needs like I hoped, and he price doesn't warrant a purchase, when my 1000 dollar work laptop has a 650m NVIDIA card with 8 gigs of RAM and an i7, which can actually run anything it needs to with no problems at all, not to me ...


Yeah, we're on the same page. I think the only caveat being, if you are able to break your CAD projects into smaller pieces, you would be able to work on them using the surface.
 
2012-10-24 02:53:41 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: $500 surface RT will be limited to MS office and MS market apps. No legacy software for you.


Exactly. As I said above, people on the road are using Office/OneNote, along with taking/including photos of projects and ADA inspections. They aren't rendering projects. At most, they'll need to open up .pdf versions of our blueprints and notate in OneNote corrections for designers back in the office to modify back in Revit. No need for legacy software in that workflow.
 
2012-10-24 02:58:33 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: mtb9000: MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: /work pc is a dual Xeon 3ghz (8 cores total) - 8gb ram - nvidia quadro fx 3800
//home pc AMD Athlon II 3ghz - 16gb ram - nvidia GeForce 460 1gb
///$2000 laptops can't hang and a MS tablet won't either
//// I want to believe

You'd love our new laptops for dedicated CAD designing (just took delivery of two more today):
Dell Precision M6700
Core i7 3840qm (2.8 GHz), 16 gig DDR3 (1855MHz), 128 SATA 3 SSD, Quadro K5000M w/4 gig (1344 stream processors, 96 GB/second throughput)

At about 8 lbs though - so they're not exactly the best for taking out into the field. Their battery life is measured in minutes, not hours. And at about $5k a pop (plus about another $10k in software), I'd much rather supply a supplementary $500 Surface RT for folks on the road.

The Dell inspiron17R is surprisingly awesome, and only runs 1000ish. My experience with the M4000 M6000 has been pretty negative. Not because they are bad computers, but they seem to run about 2-3x what the non quadro counterpart would. However, any large business seems to choose them.

I've been seriously impressed with the 600 mobile series NVIDIA cards. I get very comparable performance to my desktops.

Nvidia mobile cards are hands down better than any integrated graphics bullshiat. I find it amazing how hard it is now days to find dedicated gpu in a laptop.

My dream laptop would be a second gen Alienware m11 with dedicated and integrated graphics. But I have heard it's heat level is on par with "ouch my balls"


Actually, my personal experience with dedicated and integrated graphics amounts to STAY THE fark AWAY. Seriously, the stupid optimus bull shiat ruined about 3 months of my work life, and it partly goes back to what I mentioned with respect to the maturing drivers.

I think NVIDIA has gotten to a point now where when you actually tell the NVIDIA control panel to only use the discrete card, it does. For a while that wasn't the case.

There are quite a few great laptops with 600 series cards in them now. I work for a company where we have to deploy dells to customers, so I reluctantly purchased one for myself. I ended up being incredibly happy with it though. If you were looking for a really great laptop that can meet all your graphics needs, I'd go with a lenovo or dell in the 1000-1300 range. Just make sure it has a 600 series card and a next gen i7, I guarantee you will be happy with it.
 
2012-10-24 03:00:44 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: Integrated graphics and Autodesk suite does not compute.

12gigs just for installing

http://usa.autodesk.com/civil-3d/system-requirements/

Ummm, dude. When you look at the 64-bit requirements, they say Civil 3D needs 12 gigs of hard drive space, 4 gigs of ram and a P-4 processor. It doesn't even mention graphics. There's quite a bit of horsepower in a current Core i5 or i7 proc & associated graphics. More than enough to do the job. It won't have all the bells and whistles in terms of live texture modeling, but it surprisingly runs a lot of 3d programs smoothly (Sketchup, Google Earth, Revit 2013 and even 3Ds Max).

Where it starts to show its CAD limitations are on our 300+ unit projects and when it comes to final rendering. 4/8 CPU cores don't have a chance vs. 1344 CUDA GPU cores.


Um dude, what are designing? Tree houses? And installing by what auto desk is saying your eating up 12gigs of space on your new surface tablet.

BTW autodesk didn't introduce "hardware acceleration" for shiats and giggles.

Microsoft is trying to sell this thing as a ultra book in tablet form and everyone is drulling over it thinking it will perform anywhere close. I keep saying I want to be wrong, but my experience and the data I work with everyday we are lucky if autocad/civil 3d isn't crashing on our $10k hp z600s

There is $10 app that you can get on your iPhone/android/iPad etc that will allow to remote into any pc you have. Splashtop. You have an Internet connection, you have you workstation at your fingertips.
 
2012-10-24 03:03:42 AM

MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: $500 surface RT will be limited to MS office and MS market apps. No legacy software for you.

Exactly. As I said above, people on the road are using Office/OneNote, along with taking/including photos of projects and ADA inspections. They aren't rendering projects. At most, they'll need to open up .pdf versions of our blueprints and notate in OneNote corrections for designers back in the office to modify back in Revit. No need for legacy software in that workflow.


So why waste your yearly/quarterly bonus on new hardware. Tell them to use their company phones.

Money saved. Send me my cut.
 
2012-10-24 03:07:57 AM
apple fanboys arguing with somewhat less delusional apple fanboys
what's the difference between Microsoft and Apple? Nobody pretends Microsoft doesn't suck.
 
2012-10-24 03:08:11 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: MrSteve007: Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: $500 surface RT will be limited to MS office and MS market apps. No legacy software for you.

Exactly. As I said above, people on the road are using Office/OneNote, along with taking/including photos of projects and ADA inspections. They aren't rendering projects. At most, they'll need to open up .pdf versions of our blueprints and notate in OneNote corrections for designers back in the office to modify back in Revit. No need for legacy software in that workflow.

So why waste your yearly/quarterly bonus on new hardware. Tell them to use their company phones.

Money saved. Send me my cut.


Why are you opening up PDF versions of your dwgs? Autodesk has mobile software for exactly what you are describing. Autocad WS
 
2012-10-24 03:09:56 AM

falcon176: apple fanboys arguing with somewhat less delusional apple fanboys
what's the difference between Microsoft and Apple? Nobody pretends Microsoft doesn't suck.


Yeah......this thread venture waaaaaaaay off that path long ago.

Thanks for stoping by.
 
2012-10-24 03:32:28 AM

Kate Gosselin's Pap Smear: Why are you opening up PDF versions of your dwgs? Autodesk has mobile software for exactly what you are describing. Autocad WS


For our ADA inspections/renovations, it usually goes like this:

Arrive at 1998 built City-X Airport Marriott, open copy of as-built drawings (sometimes our originals from the 1990's, or from another architect). Take photos of areas that'll be an issue to upgrade to meet code. Use Tablet PC/OneNote to notate on those photos real-world dimensions, suggestions, and potential problems. Add notated photos as comments on the as-built .pdf - email final overview notes and attach modified .pdf to designers back at the office to update their renovation blueprints. Move on to next project, collect $40,000.

We did some three dozen ADA renovations last month. Seems to be a pretty efficient workflow - especially considering we're dealing with documentation that's almost always over a decade old. If we just wanted to look at blueprints, AutoCAD WS is fine and we tried using it with iPads. When it comes to billable time, we found it's much more simple and less prone to error by adding location photo content, write notes on the images, combine them with the .pdf document, and send back all the data for modifications by CAD designers with mice, 27" monitors and then have our field guy move on to the next project. That way there's several levels of redundancy and better documentation of actual conditions in the field vs. relying on old as-built drawings.
 
2012-10-24 03:41:00 AM
Wasn't gizmodo the ones who bought the stolen iPhone 4 and ran articles about it, which was followed by Apple never inviting them to the events anymore?
 
2012-10-24 05:41:54 AM
Just remember folks All tech companies hire college kids to talk about their products on message boards like this.

I wonder if drew has a background script that can check if someone only comments in the apple pages (or android) and the nature of their comments as of to scan out the marketers? 

/or any other type of company that would do such a thing
 
2012-10-24 05:52:02 AM
tablets are kind of redundant if you already own a smartphone

/runs
 
2012-10-24 05:56:28 AM

Irving Maimway: The first Kindle Fire, once applied with side loaded apps was a great entertainer of children at decent dining establishments. Slap a couple of ripped movies and some Blue's Clues on there and the boy ate all his dinner bites and let the Ex-Mrs. Maimway and I enjoy a nice dinner.


This. Went to a restaurant last week that is geared for adults. There were a few kids there, each one parked in front of an iPad, engrossed. None of them were screaming heathens. Thanks, e-babysitters!
 
2012-10-24 06:09:20 AM

theresnothinglft: huh i thought my iPod already was an iPad mini.


Actually, the iPod Touch 4G was a more capable tablet than the 1st generation iPad mainly because it
had a forward-facing camera.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who refers to his iPod Touch 4G as an 'iPad Mini'.

/Love my pocket sized supplemental computational appliance.
 
2012-10-24 06:34:52 AM

Ess_Aytch: kroonermanblack: Ya, to hell with all that exercise and outdoor activity and healthy stuff. Who needs sunlight anyway, rickets isn't a real disease, let's focus on more technology in the classroom.

The kids are doing just fine without a playground. They're outside on the field several times a day (in addition to indoor government-mandated daily physical activity), running around and using - gasp - their imaginations. We provide them with balls, frisbees, jump ropes, etc. They get their outdoor activity in spades.

Having a playground will result in more stupid arguments and kids running around less. The playground is more for the parents, just so they can say the school has one, like the other school in town. That's all it is. Is this worth more than most people pay for their condos around here? Nope.

If your school is of the age to need a playground, getting new toys isn't the best investment given the life span of each and the general mindset of people that age.

The iPads are great for student engagement. There's so many great apps for research content creation, giving students opportunities to show me what they know. They can do everything on one device, and not just sitting in a chair in a lab. If you're trying to design a universal learning environment, tablets such as our iPads are the way to go. The students are incredibly careful with the iPads, and we keep ours in big cases.

If you're in an inquiry-based school like mine, iPads are great. 1:1 is the way of the future, and the iPad mini will bring many schools there more quickly.


I sincerely hope that, for some benevolent reason that brings only good things to you and your family, you decide to change careers soon.
 
2012-10-24 06:48:40 AM

fustanella: There were a few kids there, each one parked in front of an iPad, engrossed. None of them were screaming heathens. Thanks, e-babysitters!


Sad.
 
2012-10-24 08:22:26 AM

H31N0US: fustanella: There were a few kids there, each one parked in front of an iPad, engrossed. None of them were screaming heathens. Thanks, e-babysitters!

Sad.


Dunno... He sounds pretty happy to me.
 
2012-10-24 08:22:59 AM

jaytkay: IMDWalrus: Unless you're one of those hardcore Apple fans blind to the outside world there's no reason not to get a Kindle Fire, Nexus 7, or something that's more capable and has better features for the same price as an iPad Mini.

Apple is a good choice for non tech-savvy people.

I have friends and acquaintances who can't understand how to save a Word file on their computer and email it to somebody. They might print it out and fax it (I am not kidding).

I would rather drink hemlock than try to teach them to use an Android device.

But they CAN figure how to work their iPods and iPhones and iPads. Nobody approaches Apple for great interface design.


As an iPad user, I find your example of "saving word files on a computer and emailing it to somebody" kind of hilarious, given the frustrating way the iPad handles things like that. From what I can tell, you can't even delete a photo from the iPad unless it's in the "camera roll". Sure browsing the internet or checking email is just fine on it....which I assume is just as easy on any other mini-tablet.

Anyway, back to the matter at hand. Aside from the insane price point of the iPad Mini, I really think that this was a rush job just to get a min-tablet out there this Christmas, as mini-tablets are going to be a hot item.

And I think you'd be insane to buy one right now anyway because of this:
Much like how they killed of the iPad3 in only 6 months, I'm guessing that they'll be updating the iPad Mini to their "Retina Display" in March, given that it's currently sitting at the worst pixel count amongst the mini-tablet market.
 
2012-10-24 08:24:07 AM

Ess_Aytch:

As a teacher, I can tell you that the iPad mini will kill in the education market. My school division has already begun equipping schools with iPads; my school has a cart, plus three in each classroom. For about $75,000 we could purchase enough iPad minis to get us to a 1:1 ratio. Meanwhile, we're fundraising to buy a playground - which costs $250,000 and I find completely asinine.


That is what i was thinking too. So many schools are requiring the students to use tablets now a smaller version for middle/elementary school just makes sense. It will sell millions and people will be left wondering why the nexus never made it in that market.
 
2012-10-24 08:26:19 AM

Ess_Aytch:
As a teacher, I can tell you that the iPad mini will kill in the education market. My school division has already begun equipping schools with iPads; my school has a cart, plus three in each classroom. For about $75,000 we could purchase enough iPad minis to get us to a 1:1 ratio. Meanwhile, we're fundraising to buy a playground - which costs $250,000 and I find completely asinine.


Given the price point, you could buy the same amount of Kindle Fires for $45,000 -- which you could them put $30,000 into the playground equipment fund.
 
2012-10-24 08:27:58 AM
No wireless. Less space than a nomad. Lame.

/Gotta work some time
 
2012-10-24 08:29:57 AM

snowshovel: Ess_Aytch:
As a teacher, I can tell you that the iPad mini will kill in the education market. My school division has already begun equipping schools with iPads; my school has a cart, plus three in each classroom. For about $75,000 we could purchase enough iPad minis to get us to a 1:1 ratio. Meanwhile, we're fundraising to buy a playground - which costs $250,000 and I find completely asinine.

Given the price point, you could buy the same amount of Kindle Fires for $45,000 -- which you could them put $30,000 into the playground equipment fund.


You just need to convince textbook publishers to also make android versions. Right now they are releasing ibooks only versions.
 
2012-10-24 08:32:45 AM

moothemagiccow: smart board is a 4x2.5 ft touch screen from 1998. Like a digital chalkboard. Never took off because of the price. Schools with too much money would buy one for the whole campus. I suppose they're still going.


Uhhh....just about every school in my province has installed a Smart Board in just about every classroom. They're quite popular, actually.
 
2012-10-24 08:34:13 AM

jaytkay: Ess_Aytch: Tablets are a better form factor for consuming and creating in an elementary school.

What are they "creating" on a tablet?


Digital presentations, movies, ebooks, editing photos. Things that, yes, can be done on a notebook or desktop computer, but are easier to do for an 8 year old on a tablet.
 
2012-10-24 08:35:06 AM

snowshovel: Given the price point, you could buy the same amount of Kindle Fires for $45,000 -- which you could them put $30,000 into the playground equipment fund.


The schools in my division are all Mac-based. So yeah, we'll go with iPads like we've already begun to do.
 
2012-10-24 08:37:05 AM

jso2897: I sincerely hope that, for some benevolent reason that brings only good things to you and your family, you decide to change careers soon.


Why? Because I embrace the future of education? Because my values align with my school division and provincial education authority? Because I recognize that education systems have to change in order for students to be able to compete in a changing economy? Please, I'd love to hear what you have to say.
 
2012-10-24 08:37:38 AM

Fade2black: Its been said a million times, but...

I have a mini, it's called a goddamn iphone.

Desktop, laptop, smartphone. And all that jargon about watching movies on these minis? Really? You're telling me people really enjoy watching a movie on 7 inches instead of plopping in a blu ray to your flatscreen or computer at home?

Fool, money, etc.

/and this from a "fanboi"


I'm guessing you don't get out of the house much.
 
2012-10-24 08:39:22 AM
Also, i'm glad that as tablets take over in education TI will be forced to stop selling their crap TI-83 for $100.
 
2012-10-24 08:41:15 AM
If we are going to crap on Apple about something, it should be for sacrificing functionality in order to make a damn desktop computer thinner and lighter. I don't care how heavy or thick my desktop computer is!
 
2012-10-24 08:42:33 AM

hawcian: And yet, people will eat it up, thinking it's the same as the newest iPad except in a smaller casing.


That will be the iPad Mini 2...released in about 6 months time. If you are Apple, and knowing its fan base, you would be stupid blowing your load on the first version of any new form factor version of any of their products - create one based on older technology first, and then update it a few times within a year or two of releasing it to milk those same users several times for the same product.
 
Xai
2012-10-24 08:47:55 AM
apple could brand a turd and it would sell - they are an awesome company because they know how to get people to buy things even when they don't want them.

I mean look at the iPad - people bought them and then after buying them tried to find ways to use them. Now that is branding.
 
2012-10-24 08:49:01 AM

Ess_Aytch: Ghastly: Too big to be a phone...

Not a Samsung phone...

In all seriousness, my wife is a non-techy, average computer user. She's been running a piece of shiat LG netbook for a few years. She saw the iPad mini and immediately wanted one. For what she wants, it's perfect. She's going to buy one with her Christmas money.

As a teacher, I can tell you that the iPad mini will kill in the education market. My school division has already begun equipping schools with iPads; my school has a cart, plus three in each classroom. For about $75,000 we could purchase enough iPad minis to get us to a 1:1 ratio. Meanwhile, we're fundraising to buy a playground - which costs $250,000 and I find completely asinine.


So... You'd rather the little snowballs sit and be dormant...

Nice
 
2012-10-24 08:51:21 AM

Ess_Aytch: snowshovel: Given the price point, you could buy the same amount of Kindle Fires for $45,000 -- which you could them put $30,000 into the playground equipment fund.

The schools in my division are all Mac-based. So yeah, we'll go with iPads like we've already begun to do.


Why do they piss away money for a label?
 
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