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(NPR)   New study shows that 8 out of 10 young adults in the "Facebook Generation"--who are between the ages of 16 and 29--have read at least one book in the past year. Unfortunately, it was probably Twilight   (npr.org) divider line 134
    More: PSA, Facebook Generation, Facebook, American Life Project  
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1301 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Oct 2012 at 10:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-23 08:42:02 AM
Ohhh at least one book, eh? Pace yourselves, kids.
 
2012-10-23 09:08:40 AM
"America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong" - way to lower the bar, NPR. One book a year is not strong, it's pathetic.
 
2012-10-23 09:34:37 AM
And that's compared to about 7 in 10 adults in general, American adults. So, they're reading - they're more likely to read, and they're also a little more likely to be using their library."

And unfortunately, this was probably 50 Shades of Grey
 
2012-10-23 09:47:08 AM
One book? I shiat one book a year out. Like literally, on the shiatter.

My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year. I'm closer to 10-15.

Call me when you match that.
 
2012-10-23 10:01:46 AM

bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.


How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?
 
2012-10-23 10:08:52 AM

sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?


Well for one, he listens to audiobooks to and from work.

Besides, a fast reader can consume a good-sized book in 10-12 hours. Consider that many people watch TV an average of I dunno 4-5 hrs a night? It's not that hard to do.

I definitely take more of a week or two to get through something.
 
2012-10-23 10:08:56 AM
In this thread: A bunch old assholes claiming that one book is not enough and failing to realize that it's more than their cohort is currently reading.
 
2012-10-23 10:10:01 AM
Ugh, why are they reading such drivel when there are novelizations of the Firefly and Dr. Who series to be read endlessly. Also, RA Salvatore's classic masterpieces about Drow elves! Iweep that this generation will never know the classic literature of Tracy Weis and Hickman.

sweetmelissa31:
How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.
 
2012-10-23 10:11:30 AM
I'm apart of this "Facebook generation," and I personally have read 5 books this past year, most of them being 500+ pages.


/love to read
 
2012-10-23 10:13:32 AM
What is the general consensus on audiobooks? Do you count listening to audiobooks as reading?

Me, personally, I do not; and this is coming from someone who knocks over a dozen or so audiobooks a year.
 
2012-10-23 10:13:48 AM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: Ugh, why are they reading such drivel when there are novelizations of the Firefly and Dr. Who series to be read endlessly. Also, RA Salvatore's classic masterpieces about Drow elves! Iweep that this generation will never know the classic literature of Tracy Weis and Hickman.

sweetmelissa31: How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.


lol
 
2012-10-23 10:13:53 AM

sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?


I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.
 
2012-10-23 10:14:55 AM
Hmmm... my daughter is 14 and a half and is a furious reader. New "Artemis Fowle" book? Buy it on Satuday morning, have it done Saturday evening. And no, she doesn't have a 'Facebook' account (but does have an email account as she needed one for high school). So I guess she isn't 'Facebook' generation?

Son is 11 and likes to read almost as much. The fact that my degree is English Lit. and my wife's is Archaeology means that it is a very 'pro-book' household to begin with.
 
2012-10-23 10:15:59 AM
Remember the halycon days when book snobs made fun of kids and/or adults for reading the Harry Potter books? I remember those days.
 
2012-10-23 10:16:43 AM
After working in a bookstore for the past decade, let me just say that whatever works to get them to read, do it. If it's Twilight....okay (I hated it). Honestly, there is nothing better in this world than having a small child telling you all about their favorite books.
 
2012-10-23 10:17:00 AM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.


I'm in the "facebook" generation and I certainly "know how to read." I like classic Russian literature, and those books often take me a month to digest. I don't really see the point of trying to go faster, because you probably won't get as much out of each book. Unless you're in some kind of speed reading competition.
 
2012-10-23 10:17:35 AM
Generations!

TO YOUR BATTLE STATIONS!
 
2012-10-23 10:18:29 AM
I just took a quick peek at what I read this year (checked my Kindle and Nook accounts). 19 books, and I'm what I consider to be a casual reader.
 
2012-10-23 10:18:36 AM
It's not a surprise that more young people are reading these days. Between Video games, texting, and the internet there are more reasons for them to be reading than there was for previous generations without those technologies being part of their childhood.
 
2012-10-23 10:18:45 AM

Raug the Dwarf: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.


Same for me. E-readers really make things much easier.
 
2012-10-23 10:18:57 AM

sweetmelissa31: SockMonkeyHolocaust: It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.

I'm in the "facebook" generation and I certainly "know how to read." I like classic Russian literature, and those books often take me a month to digest. I don't really see the point of trying to go faster, because you probably won't get as much out of each book. Unless you're in some kind of speed reading competition.


Don't feed it.
 
2012-10-23 10:22:24 AM
*looks at shelf of the Fark book, Maddox book, both of Livestock's books, What White People Like Volumes I through XII, the Onion book, everything Steven Colbert wrote and the novelization of 'Snakes on A Plane'*

Yeah, you could say I am not the average slackjawed sheeple afraid of the printed word. My kindle has at least 200 to 300 short stories of the Steam Punk genre.
 
2012-10-23 10:26:20 AM

TheTrashcanMan: I'm apart of this "Facebook generation," and I personally have read 5 books this past year, most of them being 500+ pages.


/love to read


Reading is boring as fark to me, and I've read 4 books already this year. Plus I've listened to another 3. If I weren't making money I wouldn't do it though cause books and book files are a little expensive and assume you can't find a cheaper means of entertainment.

inb4 going to a library. Yeah sure, those are great when you don't like fiction. I'd rather own it anyways.
 
2012-10-23 10:26:26 AM
E-reader + public library with e-book collection = massive amounts of free books without ever having to leave my home.

If you don't have an e-reader you don't know what you're missing.
 
2012-10-23 10:27:16 AM

sweetmelissa31: I'm in the "facebook" generation and I certainly "know how to read." I like classic Russian literature, and those books often take me a month to digest. I don't really see the point of trying to go faster, because you probably won't get as much out of each book. Unless you're in some kind of speed reading competition.


Ok, well then different people read at different speeds. You're just slower than others. I went through a classic Russian lit phase and it did take a little longer because reading the historical context of each story and reading about the authors were necessary. You're certainly not going to blast through Brothers Karamazov as fast as you are something like Blood Meridian or the teleplay for the Jurassic Bark episode of 'Futurama'.

FreetardoRivera:

Don't feed it.


I am going to take exception with this. Not everything you disagree with is a troll. Go be one of those people that announce what color you're farkying someone or that you have never used your ignore list UNTIL NOW if you have to be one of those kind of people.
 
2012-10-23 10:31:09 AM

naughtyrev: "America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong" - way to lower the bar, NPR. One book a year is not strong, it's pathetic.


I'd rather have a friend who reads at least one book a year, than NONE in ten years. Hell, it's nice to hear about what somebody read, if even it was the only book they ever read. You sounds nerdy.
 
2012-10-23 10:32:31 AM
Or Harry Potter. The new liberal smugness: The movie was better.
 
2012-10-23 10:32:47 AM

bdub77: One book? I shiat one book a year out. Like literally, on the shiatter.

My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year. I'm closer to 10-15.

Call me when you match that.


What's your number? I work offshore 28 days at a time, 9 months out of the year and generally go through a book about every 2-3 days...., not including when I'm flying or otherwise in transit...

/13 hour flights and an ereader go so WELL together!!!
 
2012-10-23 10:33:08 AM
Can they read books with real words or just the ones printed in text speak?
 
2012-10-23 10:33:13 AM
I am in that age group, and in the past year I have read about 7 books

/It was a slow year
//Did about 30 last year
 
2012-10-23 10:34:05 AM
I am also in that age group, and I'm at 54 books.
 
2012-10-23 10:35:33 AM
I've read over 100 books between June and August of various lengths and genres (including Twilight just so I can say I actually finished it, and without the aid of booze, as the last attempt at it I gave up at 400 pp and 26 oz of Dark Rum. How my ereader didn't end up smashed, I don't know.)

I'm 27, do I get prize or something?

/read Ulysses and Gone With the Wind back to back this past summer
//also read a lot of "crap" too, such as Stranger in a Strange Land, hippies suck
 
2012-10-23 10:35:48 AM

LeafyGreens: Raug the Dwarf: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.

Same for me. E-readers really make things much easier.


I'm not even using an e-reader. I had a friend that used to own a bookstore. When she went out of business, I ended up with quite a bit of the inventory. Lucked out on that deal, I can tell you.
 
2012-10-23 10:35:48 AM
I used to plow through 5-10 books a month when I was younger. Now, I'm lucky if I get to read a book or 2 a month with all the stuff I have going on.

My wife, on the other hand, reads prodigiously. She reads faster and retains more information from books than any other person that I know or heard of. She's the reason one of the rooms in our house is a Library.
 
2012-10-23 10:38:28 AM
Doesn't matter if it's Twilight, 50 Shades of Grey, or a birdcage liner (NY Times), reading > watching TV or spending time on some faux news webpage.

/Not FARK... FauxNEWS
//OK, maybe FARK too.
 
2012-10-23 10:38:36 AM

kendelrio: bdub77: One book? I shiat one book a year out. Like literally, on the shiatter.

My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year. I'm closer to 10-15.

Call me when you match that.

What's your number? I work offshore 28 days at a time, 9 months out of the year and generally go through a book about every 2-3 days...., not including when I'm flying or otherwise in transit...

/13 hour flights and an ereader go so WELL together!!!


LOL. I meant call me when your study shows 8 out of 10 young adults read more than 30 books a year.
 
2012-10-23 10:38:42 AM

bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

Well for one, he listens to audiobooks to and from work.

Besides, a fast reader can consume a good-sized book in 10-12 hours. Consider that many people watch TV an average of I dunno 4-5 hrs a night? It's not that hard to do.

I definitely take more of a week or two to get through something.


Well, it really comes down to the length of the book, spacing, and font size.

Some 200 to 300 page books have very generous spacing and font -- clearly the publisher wanted it to be over 200 pages. Books like that I can bang out in two to three days.

Something like Passage to Power is a 600 page densely spaced book -- the audio version is 32+ hours. To finish that in less than a week you need to be reading it four or five hours a day, at least. It took me about three weeks reading anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours a day. And lets say you're doing to the audio version -- to complete it in seven days you'd have to listen for over 4.5 hours a day.
 
2012-10-23 10:40:03 AM
So far, I have read through 22 books this year. An even mix of fiction and non-fiction, plus a couple of favorites that I decided I hadn't read in awhile. That's pretty average for me.

My daughter is in the 6th grade. She is required to read 2 books every month. That's pretty good, considering they have to be chapter books on her level or they don't count toward the goal.
 
2012-10-23 10:40:56 AM

thecpt: TheTrashcanMan: I'm apart of this "Facebook generation," and I personally have read 5 books this past year, most of them being 500+ pages.


/love to read

Reading is boring as fark to me, and I've read 4 books already this year. Plus I've listened to another 3. If I weren't making money I wouldn't do it though cause books and book files are a little expensive and assume you can't find a cheaper means of entertainment.

inb4 going to a library. Yeah sure, those are great when you don't like fiction. I'd rather own it anyways.


I probably would have read more, but I also have a full time job, just graduated college, and have hobbies. I read when I can.
 
2012-10-23 10:41:42 AM
Since this is a book thread, can anyone recommend books on the eastern front? I've just finished up a book on Kursk and was thinking of picking up something on Barbarossa. Glantz seems to be the author to go with but I would like suggestions.
 
2012-10-23 10:41:52 AM
I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.
 
2012-10-23 10:48:03 AM

bibli0phile: Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.


That's what I always try to convince people of. I finally convinced my nephew to start reading by introducing him to The Looking Glass Wars. When he was done, he asked "What's next." I've been trying to keep him reading all year. So far, so good.
 
2012-10-23 10:49:05 AM
Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?
 
2012-10-23 10:53:05 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


Hmm, how about some classic noir by Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett? Herman Wouk is also good. I'm also partial to John Le Carre.
 
2012-10-23 10:54:49 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


Sci-fi military? Hmm.

Well, first off, Asimov. Vernor Vinge. Ender's Game (even though I think Orson Scott Card is a turd nugget of a human being).

If you want some tougher reading, Philip K Dick is great. Larry Niven I've heard good things but haven't read.

I don't really read Ludlum so I can't really say much there. You're never hurt reading some classic books either though - Dostoevsky is great. From there you could try Solzhenitsyn's book about Russian gulags, which is dark but interesting.
 
2012-10-23 10:54:51 AM

BohemianGraham: mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?

Hmm, how about some classic noir by Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett? Herman Wouk is also good. I'm also partial to John Le Carre.


Thanks, I'll see what our town library has from these authors.
 
2012-10-23 10:56:22 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


May I recommend reading a few history books.
 
2012-10-23 10:56:28 AM

bibli0phile: I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.


I generally agree, my only concern is what it teaches publishers and writers. My fear is that we get flooded with shiat (why write or publish compelling, original, quality work when you can squirt out fan-fic based on poorly written crap in the first place and make huge money?) and have a limited selection of quality to pick from. Thankfully my predictions here in the literary world have been wrong, and I hope that trend continues.

A friend of mine commented recently that there is a very large amount of modern writing which reads as if it's been written with the hopes of being optioned for TV or Film. I think the example she used was The Hunger Games. I just hope this is a passing trend.
 
2012-10-23 10:56:40 AM

bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.


It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)
 
2012-10-23 10:57:39 AM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: May I recommend reading a few history books.


I'm guessing you don't agree with the bolded statement.

How about in MODERN history? Better? :-P
 
2012-10-23 10:58:01 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


I am currently re-reading a collection of Robert Silverberg short-fiction. Novel-wise, "Lord Valentine's Castle" might be a good place to start with Silverberg. Of course, Silverberg has a career 40+ years long so there is lots to choose from.
 
2012-10-23 10:59:26 AM

Dissociater: bibli0phile: I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.

I generally agree, my only concern is what it teaches publishers and writers. My fear is that we get flooded with shiat (why write or publish compelling, original, quality work when you can squirt out fan-fic based on poorly written crap in the first place and make huge money?) and have a limited selection of quality to pick from. Thankfully my predictions here in the literary world have been wrong, and I hope that trend continues.

A friend of mine commented recently that there is a very large amount of modern writing which reads as if it's been written with the hopes of being optioned for TV or Film. I think the example she used was The Hunger Games. I just hope this is a passing trend.


That can be good and bad. I know a lot of people who are compelled to read the source material for the awesome new film or tv series they just watch.

/I'll get to Game of Thrones in both literary and TV format eventually.
 
2012-10-23 10:59:43 AM
i prefer watching sports.
 
2012-10-23 11:01:16 AM

mainstreet62: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: May I recommend reading a few history books.

I'm guessing you don't agree with the bolded statement.

How about in MODERN history? Better? :-P


I would say this century. Of course, we're only 12 years into it.
 
2012-10-23 11:01:37 AM

mainstreet62: It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.


This is a little more of the scifi with less of the military but read Snowcrash - fast paced, good depth. You might also like William Gibson, Neuromancer is a classic.
 
2012-10-23 11:01:52 AM

BohemianGraham: Dissociater: bibli0phile: I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.

I generally agree, my only concern is what it teaches publishers and writers. My fear is that we get flooded with shiat (why write or publish compelling, original, quality work when you can squirt out fan-fic based on poorly written crap in the first place and make huge money?) and have a limited selection of quality to pick from. Thankfully my predictions here in the literary world have been wrong, and I hope that trend continues.

A friend of mine commented recently that there is a very large amount of modern writing which reads as if it's been written with the hopes of being optioned for TV or Film. I think the example she used was The Hunger Games. I just hope this is a passing trend.

That can be good and bad. I know a lot of people who are compelled to read the source material for the awesome new film or tv series they just watch.

/I'll get to Game of Thrones in both literary and TV format eventually.


Good point, I guess there are two sides for it. I know as a kid I read starship troopers after seeing the amazingly gory movie, which eventually turned me onto books like Stranger in a Strange Land.

Although I'm one of the few who found ASoFaI to be middling at best, and overall derivative with a huge pinch of cynicism. So I'm obviously in the minority ;)
 
2012-10-23 11:03:01 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


You might try W.E.B. Griffen. He has a huge number of books he started in the late 80's. One of the series is about police politics, one is a military series, and one has to do with the intelligence services. They are pretty entertaining, even though some of the early ones are a little dated.
 
2012-10-23 11:03:06 AM

SlothB77: i prefer watching sports.


I read while watching MLB. Thats what baseball is for.
 
2012-10-23 11:05:42 AM

sweetmelissa31: How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?


It typically takes me about 2 days to read any given book. 1 day if I'm really absorbed. Hell, I just finished a book yesterday that I started on Sunday.

/Reads about 5 books a month
//It's getting hard to find good sci-fi books that I haven't read.
 
2012-10-23 11:06:58 AM
15-29 is the Facebook Generation? Finally the silver lining to having hit 30.
 
2012-10-23 11:14:46 AM
Thank the gods that I don't have to be associated with a generation
that has read 50 shades of merde

Thank the gods that I'm part of the generation
that gets to suspend and flog those 20 somethings that have read the twilight fan-fiction
 
2012-10-23 11:15:02 AM
Do the books in Skyrim count?

/or all the excerpts I am reading in Dishonored?
 
xcv
2012-10-23 11:15:32 AM
More than 1 book hm? I went through a couple Harry Turtledove books but they're all the same book with different covers so I guess that doesn't count.
 
2012-10-23 11:15:54 AM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: mainstreet62: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: May I recommend reading a few history books.

I'm guessing you don't agree with the bolded statement.

How about in MODERN history? Better? :-P

I would say this century. Of course, we're only 12 years into it.


Fair enough.
 
2012-10-23 11:16:02 AM

Zarquon's Flat Tire: 15-29 is the Facebook Generation? Finally the silver lining to having hit 30.


I'm 29 and Facebook was doing its early expansion from a few colleges to most of them my senior year. I think they hit it about right.
 
2012-10-23 11:16:44 AM
hm, I recently finished up Wuthering Heights (wtf Heathcliff?!?!), and I'm about to start The Emancipator's Wife, or re-read Anathem. I've been wanting to check out Stephenson's Reamde: A Novel or his other work, The Mongoliad. Has anyone read these? Are they worth the time investment?
 
xcv
2012-10-23 11:16:50 AM

you have pee hands: Zarquon's Flat Tire: 15-29 is the Facebook Generation? Finally the silver lining to having hit 30.

I'm 29 and Facebook was doing its early expansion from a few colleges to most of them my senior year. I think they hit it about right.


So we're the Friendster generation?
 
2012-10-23 11:18:44 AM

xcv: So we're the Friendster generation?


That generation is only 3 months long and will never reproduce
 
2012-10-23 11:20:42 AM
I read maybe 5 books a year. Not much, at all. My wife is an English teacher and reads around a billion books a year (give or take).
 
2012-10-23 11:21:09 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


Robert Caro's much praised Passage to Power. He vividly details LBJ's assuming the powers of the Presidency after the assassination as well as how he pushed the Civil Rights Act through Congress. All pretty remarkable and riveting.

Probably the best biography I've ever read is American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer. He makes Steve Jobs look insignificant. It wasn't just that Oppenheimer was one of the most brilliant scientists, but he had a unique ability to manage people -- which is how he got the a-bomb built so quickly. And then the US Government ostracized him because he was against the development of the hydrogen bomb.

You've probably heard of it, but if you haven't read it yet, do so: The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America
 
2012-10-23 11:21:19 AM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


If you like Military action, you might try John Ringo. The Kildar series is a lot of fun. There is a ton of sex and bondage tossed in too.
 
2012-10-23 11:26:48 AM

EZ Writer: Doesn't matter if it's Twilight, 50 Shades of Grey, or a birdcage liner (NY Times), reading > watching TV or spending time on some faux news webpage.

/Not FARK... FauxNEWS
//OK, maybe FARK too.


That is just dumb. There are plenty of television shows that offer more than 98% of books written.

Dissociater: I generally agree, my only concern is what it teaches publishers and writers. My fear is that we get flooded with shiat (why write or publish compelling, original, quality work when you can squirt out fan-fic based on poorly written crap in the first place and make huge money?) and have a limited selection of quality to pick from. Thankfully my predictions here in the literary world have been wrong, and I hope that trend continues.

A friend of mine commented recently that there is a very large amount of modern writing which reads as if it's been written with the hopes of being optioned for TV or Film. I think the example she used was The Hunger Games. I just hope this is a passing trend.


There's been crappy books being produced since the printing press. It is just how it works - the easily disposed of crap is disposed of and forgotten while the quility works get remembered.

The screenplay book is just a new form (though some of them are insanely annoying).
 
2012-10-23 11:26:52 AM
I dunno, but reading 2-4 books per month seemed to have stopped ever since I got a job with a 10+ hour workday, 1-2 weekend days per month, and twin toddlers.

Can anyone explain this?

/On the plus side, because of our subscription to the New Yorker, I become more erudite during every bowel movement. After all, reading a six-page book review is like reading the book.
 
2012-10-23 11:27:53 AM

mainstreet62: bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.

It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)


If you havent read Ender's Game I highly recommend it. It is Sci-fi military and one of the best books I have ever read.
 
2012-10-23 11:31:21 AM

Gunny Highway: mainstreet62: bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.

It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)

If you havent read Ender's Game I highly recommend it. It is Sci-fi military and one of the best books I have ever read.


I picked up Ender's Game not knowing anything about it, except that it was good. I started reading and was forced to go to sleep half way through because it was 2am. It's that good. Next day I finished it. Wonderful book.
 
2012-10-23 11:36:29 AM

seniorgato: Gunny Highway: mainstreet62: bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.

It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)

If you havent read Ender's Game I highly recommend it. It is Sci-fi military and one of the best books I have ever read.

I picked up Ender's Game not knowing anything about it, except that it was good. I started reading and was forced to go to sleep half way through because it was 2am. It's that good. Next day I finished it. Wonderful book.


The next book "Speaker for the Dead" is a better book. Then stop reading the series, because it all goes to crap after "Speaker".
 
2012-10-23 11:38:18 AM

Burr: Do the books in Skyrim count?

/or all the excerpts I am reading in Dishonored?


All the volumes of the "Argonian Account", or "The Wolf Queen", yes.

"The Lusty Argonian Maid", not so much. :)
 
2012-10-23 11:38:32 AM

ObscureNameHere: seniorgato: Gunny Highway: mainstreet62: bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.

It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)

If you havent read Ender's Game I highly recommend it. It is Sci-fi military and one of the best books I have ever read.

I picked up Ender's Game not knowing anything about it, except that it was good. I started reading and was forced to go to sleep half way through because it was 2am. It's that good. Next day I finished it. Wonderful book.

The next book "Speaker for the Dead" is a better book. Then stop reading the series, because it all goes to crap after "Speaker".


Ender In Exile was alright. It didn't go anywhere and nothing happened in it, but the psychology and motivations behind those characters was spot on. It takes place before Speaker for the Dead, though it was written several years afterwards.
 
2012-10-23 11:41:24 AM

sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?


Most likely little TV and a fast reading speed. I can finish a standard 300 page novel in about 3 to 4 hours, and I've known faster readers. I finish a couple of books a week without trouble, and that's with hobbies and a friend. If I watched absolutely no TV (I watch some) I could probably finish 3-4 books a week. That being said, there is a huge difference between reading fiction novels for fun and reading dense material for work or education.
 
2012-10-23 11:43:53 AM

ObscureNameHere: seniorgato: Gunny Highway: mainstreet62: bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.

It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)

If you havent read Ender's Game I highly recommend it. It is Sci-fi military and one of the best books I have ever read.

I picked up Ender's Game not knowing anything about it, except that it was good. I started reading and was forced to go to sleep half way through because it was 2am. It's that good. Next day I finished it. Wonderful book.

The next book "Speaker for the Dead" is a better book. Then stop reading the series, because it all goes to crap after "Speaker".


I just purchased 'Speaker of the Dead.' Finishing up 3 or 4 books I started and put down before I dive in.
 
2012-10-23 11:46:16 AM
I'd like to read more informative non-fiction stuff, and I do really like some of the better written informational books, but after reading technical specs and manuals all day, I like to unwind and take my time with whatever mindless fiction I can. I also like to read slow. It's taken me about a year to get through A Song of Ice and Fire, so meh, it's cheaper entertainment that way.

/internet is generally better for short to medium length non-fiction/news analysis anyway
 
2012-10-23 11:54:18 AM

Lupine Chemist: I'd like to read more informative non-fiction stuff, and I do really like some of the better written informational books, but after reading technical specs and manuals all day, I like to unwind and take my time with whatever mindless fiction I can. I also like to read slow. It's taken me about a year to get through A Song of Ice and Fire, so meh, it's cheaper entertainment that way.

/internet is generally better for short to medium length non-fiction/news analysis anyway


Same problem, but I utterly detest fiction. I opt for educationally good stories like Sex on the Moon and Glock. They describe technical and science things but its worked into the story and is usually only a small part.
 
Biv
2012-10-23 11:58:58 AM

bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

Well for one, he listens to audiobooks to and from work.

Besides, a fast reader can consume a good-sized book in 10-12 hours. Consider that many people watch TV an average of I dunno 4-5 hrs a night? It's not that hard to do.

I definitely take more of a week or two to get through something.


This is me. I just finished the Passage. Took me ten days, but that included two weekends and I generally don't read on weekends.

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.
 
2012-10-23 12:04:37 PM

Biv: This is me. I just finished the Passage. Took me ten days, but that included two weekends and I generally don't read on weekends.

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.


Did you like it? I tried the audio version and I will never do it with a "horror" book again. There was absolutely no atmosphere, which was a shame considering how good the audio version of World War Z was.
 
Biv
2012-10-23 12:06:39 PM

Raug the Dwarf: mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?

If you like Military action, you might try John Ringo. The Kildar series is a lot of fun. There is a ton of sex and bondage tossed in too.


Another vote for John Ringo. The Kildar series rocks.
 
2012-10-23 12:06:48 PM

Biv: bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77:

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.


Honor Harringtons any good? I've read the 1632's with Flint and the Hells Gate with Evans (which sucked, btw) but I've never read any of his solo stuff. I recently rescued a couple of that series from a thrift store and hadn't bothered with them since I didn't have Basilisk Station.

/huge Baen fan.
 
Biv
2012-10-23 12:08:18 PM

thecpt: Biv: This is me. I just finished the Passage. Took me ten days, but that included two weekends and I generally don't read on weekends.

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.

Did you like it? I tried the audio version and I will never do it with a "horror" book again. There was absolutely no atmosphere, which was a shame considering how good the audio version of World War Z was.


Very much. Good thing the sequel is out, or the ending would have killed me.

And if anyone likes Post-apocy books, I push S.M. Stirling's Change series like it's crack.
 
2012-10-23 12:09:52 PM
I would have looked closer at this thread, but there weren't enough pictures.
 
Biv
2012-10-23 12:11:44 PM

Raug the Dwarf: Biv: bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77:

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.

Honor Harringtons any good? I've read the 1632's with Flint and the Hells Gate with Evans (which sucked, btw) but I've never read any of his solo stuff. I recently rescued a couple of that series from a thrift store and hadn't bothered with them since I didn't have Basilisk Station.

/huge Baen fan.


It's one of my favorite series. Weber sits upon the pantheon of Gods for me. His Empire of Man and Safehold series are both excellent as well. "A new Safehold just came out, YAY!"

Do you have an eReader? Baen has a free library and you can find most of the Harrington series and all the Empire of Man series there.


http://www.baenebooks.com/c-1-free-library.aspx
 
2012-10-23 12:12:50 PM
28

I think this year alone ive read around... 30-40?
 
xcv
2012-10-23 12:13:56 PM

thecpt: Biv: This is me. I just finished the Passage. Took me ten days, but that included two weekends and I generally don't read on weekends.

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.

Did you like it? I tried the audio version and I will never do it with a "horror" book again. There was absolutely no atmosphere, which was a shame considering how good the audio version of World War Z was.


The audio version of WWZ was abridged though, cut out some of the most interesting foreign characters IMO. As for the passage, listen to the first part, it's very well done. Then skim through the comparatively awful 2nd part.
 
2012-10-23 12:14:40 PM

Biv: Raug the Dwarf: Biv: bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77:

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.

Honor Harringtons any good? I've read the 1632's with Flint and the Hells Gate with Evans (which sucked, btw) but I've never read any of his solo stuff. I recently rescued a couple of that series from a thrift store and hadn't bothered with them since I didn't have Basilisk Station.

/huge Baen fan.

It's one of my favorite series. Weber sits upon the pantheon of Gods for me. His Empire of Man and Safehold series are both excellent as well. "A new Safehold just came out, YAY!"

Do you have an eReader? Baen has a free library and you can find most of the Harrington series and all the Empire of Man series there.


http://www.baenebooks.com/c-1-free-library.aspx


I don't have an e-reader yet. I think the misses is going to get me one for Christmas. I've turned my dad over to that site before though. He really likes the 163X series.

I've been digging on Correia since he came out a few years ago. I haven't gotten to pick up the new one yet though. Did an interview with him when MH: Alpha came out last year. He's a great guy too.
 
2012-10-23 12:16:42 PM

xcv: The audio version of WWZ was abridged though, cut out some of the most interesting foreign characters IMO. As for the passage, listen to the first part, it's very well done. Then skim through the comparatively awful 2nd part.


Didn't know that about WWZ. Maybe thats why I was utterly unsatisfied with the Passage. The second part was basically a separate book and I didn't care about anyone.

SPOILER ALERT:

and most of them died anyways.
 
2012-10-23 12:19:29 PM

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


Sci-fi military? David Weber's Honor Harrington series. He's very wordy and some people find that not to their tastes, but he still comes up with the most interesting stories and characters.

As a bonus, Baen books has actually joined the 21st century, and they've released a CD with most of Weber's work on it that explicitly states it can be freely shared. You can find it mirrored a number of places online, and it's actually legal, so it's very easy to get a sample to see if you like it.
 
2012-10-23 12:21:09 PM
Only 1 book in a year? I read about a book a week.

/39
 
2012-10-23 12:24:37 PM
I've been sticking to a New Year's resolution to read at least one book a month. It's been going really well. Definitely one of the most fun resolutions I've made. Got to read a lot of interesting stuff to boot.

/Currently reading Arnold Schwarzenegger's autobiography. In his voice in my head. Argh.
 
Biv
2012-10-23 12:28:07 PM

Raug the Dwarf: Biv: Raug the Dwarf: Biv: bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77:

I'll pop a 400 page book in a day or two, faster if I've read it before. Depends on the book. Some book read "slower" for me than others. Non-fiction really slows me down. 3-4 days instead of 1-2. I'm re-reading the Honor Harrington books for the third time. I'll knock out two by the weekend.

Honor Harringtons any good? I've read the 1632's with Flint and the Hells Gate with Evans (which sucked, btw) but I've never read any of his solo stuff. I recently rescued a couple of that series from a thrift store and hadn't bothered with them since I didn't have Basilisk Station.

/huge Baen fan.

It's one of my favorite series. Weber sits upon the pantheon of Gods for me. His Empire of Man and Safehold series are both excellent as well. "A new Safehold just came out, YAY!"

Do you have an eReader? Baen has a free library and you can find most of the Harrington series and all the Empire of Man series there.


http://www.baenebooks.com/c-1-free-library.aspx

I don't have an e-reader yet. I think the misses is going to get me one for Christmas. I've turned my dad over to that site before though. He really likes the 163X series.

I've been digging on Correia since he came out a few years ago. I haven't gotten to pick up the new one yet though. Did an interview with him when MH: Alpha came out last year. He's a great guy too.


Yeah, the Ring of Fire/163x books are at the top of my list as well. Don't know the author you're speaking of. Have to look into it
 
2012-10-23 12:30:44 PM

hundreddollarman: I've been sticking to a New Year's resolution to read at least one book a month. It's been going really well. Definitely one of the most fun resolutions I've made. Got to read a lot of interesting stuff to boot.

/Currently reading Arnold Schwarzenegger's autobiography. In his voice in my head. Argh.


I have a problem finishing books. I start 10, finish one, sprinkle in comics, start 2 more, and then finish the 11 books.

I need to learn to start, stay focused, and finish.
 
2012-10-23 12:38:03 PM

Gunny Highway: I have a problem finishing books...


Then you should read Stephen King.
 
2012-10-23 12:39:06 PM

Biv: Raug the Dwarf: Biv: Raug the Dwarf: Biv: bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77:

Yeah, the Ring of Fire/163x books are at the top of my list as well. Don't know the author you're speaking of. Have to look into it



For sure. He's got three series. Dead Six is a military thriller. Grimnoire Chronicles is, in his words, "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen meets the Xmen, set during WWI." It's great. And the Monster Hunter series is balls-to-the-wall fun.
 
2012-10-23 12:42:19 PM

naughtyrev: "America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong" - way to lower the bar, NPR. One book a year is not strong, it's pathetic.


Not so long ago, there wasn't a bar at all; that's how far we had fallen. One book a year is not a good bar, but it still represents improvement over ten years ago.
 
2012-10-23 12:42:33 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Gunny Highway: I have a problem finishing books...

Then you should read Stephen King.


My brother has been telling me this for years. He let me borrow the Dark Tower series and I am going to start once I finish the latest pile I have started.
 
2012-10-23 12:46:24 PM
Learning how to read is definitely on my bucket list for 2013.
 
Biv
2012-10-23 12:49:31 PM

Raug the Dwarf: Biv: Raug the Dwarf: Biv: Raug the Dwarf: Biv: bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77:

Yeah, the Ring of Fire/163x books are at the top of my list as well. Don't know the author you're speaking of. Have to look into it


For sure. He's got three series. Dead Six is a military thriller. Grimnoire Chronicles is, in his words, "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen meets the Xmen, set during WWI." It's great. And the Monster Hunter series is balls-to-the-wall fun.


Okay, now I'm very interested. Sounds like you would enjoy the Wild Cards series, as well. Super powers and mutants just after wwii
 
2012-10-23 12:51:13 PM
3 to 5 a week. Only because I hit Book Off every week as my treat to myself. I credit that store with my underpaid and underemployed self surviving the Great Recession relatively sane. (Unscarred, no... but relatively sane.)

/books!
 
2012-10-23 01:01:41 PM
I just listened to the Pew report from the director, Lee Rainie, here at the Internet Librarian conference in Monterey and its actually sounding pretty good. 16-29 year olds are actually reading more (yes, it may be Twilight and other crap) than previous generations as they have the access via more formats and they actually are spending more time in libraries....but they are reading. At the university I work at, a good number on on FB and the like as I watch from the reference desk, but from what I see, its a quick checkup on what everyone is doing, and then onto reading for their classes or working on projects. maybe the future isn't as doomed as I thought it was. What nobody knows is what do libraries have to do to retool in five years from now? If you know that, your the next millionaire
 
2012-10-23 01:04:39 PM

yoyoyo: Internet Librarian conference


What is this all about?

/librarian

yoyoyo: What nobody knows is what do libraries have to do to retool in five years from now?


Libraries are still trying to figure out what they should have been 10 years ago. We are helplessly behind as a profession and the solutions to problems exist on a library to library basis.

Identify your users and built your collection, programs, and mission around them.
 
2012-10-23 01:06:48 PM
I've been keeping track of each book I've read since January. Not counting audiobooks, or books read for class, or short stories/novellas, or comic books, or podcasts (I love Podcastle/Pseudopod/Escape Pod), I hit 50 books in early September. Having a Kindle app helps - easier to read on the bus that way, but I also just make the time for reading. And I can listen to audiobooks and podcasts at work and during my commute, which helps.

/Unashamed bibliophile
// The Podcastle/Pseudopod/Escape Pod network of podcasts are amazing
 
2012-10-23 01:19:08 PM
This is the last book I read:

covers.openlibrary.org
 
2012-10-23 01:21:31 PM

ObscureNameHere: seniorgato: Gunny Highway: mainstreet62: bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.

It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)

If you havent read Ender's Game I highly recommend it. It is Sci-fi military and one of the best books I have ever read.

I picked up Ender's Game not knowing anything about it, except that it was good. I started reading and was forced to go to sleep half way through because it was 2am. It's that good. Next day I finished it. Wonderful book.

The next book "Speaker for the Dead" is a better book. Then stop reading the series, because it all goes to crap after "Speaker".


Speaker for the Dead is excellent. I read both books before finding out that Orson Scott Card was a member of NOM. I still like those two books, but I cannot stand him as a person. If Ender's Game makes it to theatres, I won't see it, simply because I reserve the right not to financially support someone who wants to deny me the right to get married.

\Speaker for the Dead >> Ender's Game
\\OSC is still a bigoted jackass
 
2012-10-23 01:22:59 PM

Biv: Raug the Dwarf: mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?

If you like Military action, you might try John Ringo. The Kildar series is a lot of fun. There is a ton of sex and bondage tossed in too.

Another vote for John Ringo. The Kildar series rocks.


Obligatory: Oh John Ringo, NO!
 
2012-10-23 01:27:21 PM

madanimalscientist: \\OSC is still a bigoted jackass


I was disappointed to learn that after finishing Ender's Game
 
2012-10-23 01:35:23 PM

Gunny Highway: madanimalscientist: \\OSC is still a bigoted jackass

I was disappointed to learn that after finishing Ender's Game


I gave my brother a copy of Ender's Game, but after I explained that OSC was a decent writer, but as a person he holds some pretty bad views, and that while some of it may be a product of his generation and religion, a lot of it is him actively trying to infringe on the rights of others. And you can appreciate a work while detesting its author. Just, buy the books secondhand so that none of the money goes to the person.
 
2012-10-23 01:46:57 PM
I read four books this summer. I need to get back on it. My wishlist has almost 50 on it, and I have about six at home to get through.

I find reading for me, was something I didn't take to until my late 20's. Earlier on, it was one book a year, maybe, aside from very brief spurts where I'd read a bunch of Stephen King, Anne Rice or something. Now that I'm in my thirties, priorities have changed, and I don't go out as much. Plus I find myself thinking more and more, "GTFO my lawn, leave me alone, and let me read in peace."
 
2012-10-23 01:51:36 PM

yoyoyo: I just listened to the Pew report from the director, Lee Rainie, here at the Internet Librarian conference in Monterey and its actually sounding pretty good. 16-29 year olds are actually reading more (yes, it may be Twilight and other crap) than previous generations as they have the access via more formats and they actually are spending more time in libraries....but they are reading. At the university I work at, a good number on on FB and the like as I watch from the reference desk, but from what I see, its a quick checkup on what everyone is doing, and then onto reading for their classes or working on projects. maybe the future isn't as doomed as I thought it was. What nobody knows is what do libraries have to do to retool in five years from now? If you know that, your the next millionaire


It depends. In a small town, libraries fight to just exist due to lack of funds and public support. In cities, libraries fight against other distractions and the internet. That's not even scratching the surface, as you can surely attest.
 
2012-10-23 03:16:26 PM
I've read dozens of books this year (never keep track) but what really slows me down is the amount of scientific literature that I read daily. A 4 page paper on chemistry will take 20 min to 1 h. A 4 page paper on chem + bio will take 4 hours because I need to research background. Plus this type of reading is much more draining than normal reading.

/28
 
2012-10-23 03:21:30 PM
I don't read very often any more, but only because once I start reading I can't do anything else until I finish. I'll read 4 hours minimum a day. Most recently read was Ready Player One, a fun read about the search for hidden easter eggs in a futuristic MMO video game based upon 1980's pop culture.

This is also where I'll plug a friends free book: "The Returners". Basically a scifi story of historical figures reincarnated in modern times being hunted and killed. It's serialized so you get a new chapter about every week. It has a similar feel to "American Gods", but is definitely it's own world.
 
2012-10-23 03:53:24 PM
Just because you don't read many books a year doesn't mean you don't read frequently. I'm not claiming to be an avid reader, but I discontinue reading a majority of books halfway through, and many are nonfiction which makes a front to finish read occasionally unnecessary.
 
2012-10-23 04:17:31 PM
For the anal-retentives in the group, I suggest GoodReads. This site gives you a place to track your reading, explore book lists and things like that.
 
2012-10-23 04:38:24 PM
I am reading more snobbery than I thought I would ever see on FARK.

All of you who seem to think reading = intelligence are just playing on an out of date stereotype.
 
2012-10-23 04:40:31 PM

ObscureNameHere: The next book "Speaker for the Dead" is a better book. Then stop reading the series, because it all goes to crap after "Speaker".


Amen to that, brother. I wish someone had warned me beforehand.
 
2012-10-23 04:47:13 PM

thebigfarker: I am reading more snobbery than I thought I would ever see on FARK.


Hey, at least you're reading.
 
2012-10-23 05:23:04 PM

naughtyrev: "America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong" - way to lower the bar, NPR. One book a year is not strong, it's pathetic.


Depends on who you're talking about. First, it's best to give up some myths about reading and writing.

Myth: Reading and writing are the same as hearing and speaking.

Reality: They don't even happen in the same part of the brain.

Myth: Everyone of normal intelligence can learn to read and write.

Reality: As much as 25% of the population, and perhaps more, is congenitally incapable of reading or writing well.

Myth: "No child should be left behind."

Reality: "Individual capabilities differ, and some have limits."

I was taken in when I was in my '20s by the siren song of universal literacy and a common literature. I've since learned better. Some people can't read / write very well, and it's not clear that they really need to unless they want to.*

*I learned this, in part, as a public school teacher of 32 years' tenure. I just didn't drink the kool-aid.
 
2012-10-23 05:40:46 PM

Gunny Highway: madanimalscientist: \\OSC is still a bigoted jackass

I was disappointed to learn that after finishing Ender's Game


Why do people continually expect that their hero at _______is excluded from being a moron at ______. Or just being an unserviceable, horrible, awful person generally. How many talented people are just plain weirdos otherwise, with whom I would not pass five minutes? Oh, a lot. And talent is hardly conducive to being a well-rounded person, or interesting in any way other than in their (usually rather narrow) area of brilliance. What their brilliance does is earn them kudos, money, Oscars, which generally turns them into wholly self-obsessed idiots (there are exceptions, but not many more than it takes to prove the rule).

Albert Einstein = genius at physics, also a general bounder in his personal life and hopelessly naive about world affairs and who knows what else.

Glenn Gould = genius at piano playing, but a hopeless neurotic and general tinfoil hat.

Lance Armstrong = great cyclist, also a cheat and liar.

Fill in your own candidates, you know you have them__________.
 
2012-10-23 06:16:43 PM
Link

\I try to read, but maybe only get through 2-3 books a year, which I know is pathetic. I'll start a book (or even buy one), put it down someplace, and forget about it. There are so many other distractions, sadly.
\Does being on FARK count as "reading"?
 
2012-10-23 06:17:26 PM
Hmm image didn't post:
images.encyclopediadramatica.se
 
2012-10-23 06:18:19 PM

LeafyGreens: Raug the Dwarf: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.

Same for me. E-readers really make things much easier.


Amen to that. Prior to Kindle, I'd probably read 400 magazines and 15 books a year. Now that 100 books can follow me from the subway to the toilet at work, to the subway home, to the toilet at home, to bed, to the toilet in my home office, I can read 100 books a year, easy. Actually, I read over a hundred books the first year I had my Kindle and when I broke it out of warranty, Amazon sent me a new one for free because I was a good customer. Granted, I'm not always reading high literature, but I can get through a book pretty fast. I finished the last Jack Reacher novel in one day, although I did stay up until 2am to do it. I'll slow down for technical books or some more grueling non-fiction.

Women really miss out because most of them don't read on the can. You can do six, seven chapters easy if stuff has to work itself out for a while. Plus, there's no feeling of accomplishment like getting done in the bathroom and realizing that both your legs have fallen asleep. It means you got a really good read.
 
2012-10-23 06:57:32 PM

rico567: Fill in your own candidates, you know you have them__________.


I didnt expect anything of him. I was disappointed when I took 5 minutes to research him.
 
2012-10-23 07:35:46 PM

Gunny Highway: rico567: Fill in your own candidates, you know you have them__________.

I didnt expect anything of him. I was disappointed when I took 5 minutes to research him.


It's no different to the reactions I heard and read when Obama muffed the first debate: your gods must never stumble.
 
2012-10-23 07:42:48 PM

rico567: Gunny Highway: rico567: Fill in your own candidates, you know you have them__________.

I didnt expect anything of him. I was disappointed when I took 5 minutes to research him.

It's no different to the reactions I heard and read when Obama muffed the first debate: your gods must never stumble.


I think you are misinterpreting but sure.
 
2012-10-23 07:54:18 PM

Dissociater: bibli0phile: I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.

I generally agree, my only concern is what it teaches publishers and writers. My fear is that we get flooded with shiat (why write or publish compelling, original, quality work when you can squirt out fan-fic based on poorly written crap in the first place and make huge money?) and have a limited selection of quality to pick from. Thankfully my predictions here in the literary world have been wrong, and I hope that trend continues.

A friend of mine commented recently that there is a very large amount of modern writing which reads as if it's been written with the hopes of being optioned for TV or Film. I think the example she used was The Hunger Games. I just hope this is a passing trend.


Meh... The majority of what is published has always been crap. Same thing goes for music, movies, art, theater ...But people LIKE crap and it sells. And people who are truly gifted will continue to give us beautiful works of art and literature, which will be ignored by the majority. Same old, same old.

The only thing that's really changing is that the internet age has broken the stranglehold the publishers had over the industry. And that means more crap-- and more gems-- out on the market. I can't help but feel expanded consumer choice is a good thing.
 
2012-10-24 09:46:12 AM

bibli0phile:
The only thing that's really changing is that the internet age has broken the stranglehold the publishers had over the industry. And that means more crap-- and more gems-- out on the market. I can't help but feel expanded consumer choice is a good thing.


Except.... most authors MUST have a strong and stern editor to be / become any good.

And in the age of 'screw you, I'll do it myself!" publishing this firm guiding hand is sorely (and obviously) lacking in any 'self-published' stuff I've tried to read. The fact one's wife or girlfirend think you are 'totally, like, a brilliant writer' does not make it so.
 
2012-10-24 10:16:10 AM
Love to read, but have only read 1 book this year.

Don't watch a lot of tv, but video games on the other hand...

Last Wheel of Time book is out soon! Oh joy! January 8th needs to hurry up and come.

Then I'll just have to wait years for the next the Kingkiller Chronicles by Rothfuss (secretly hoping it'll be more than 3 books)

Not to mention a Song of Ice and Fire

Damn, I need to find some series that are already complete. Sheesh. Waiting is a biatch.
 
xcv
2012-10-24 10:23:46 AM

kemosabe: Love to read, but have only read 1 book this year.

Don't watch a lot of tv, but video games on the other hand...

Last Wheel of Time book is out soon! Oh joy! January 8th needs to hurry up and come.

Then I'll just have to wait years for the next the Kingkiller Chronicles by Rothfuss (secretly hoping it'll be more than 3 books)

Not to mention a Song of Ice and Fire

Damn, I need to find some series that are already complete. Sheesh. Waiting is a biatch.


I'm down with more Kingkiller provided the Aden don't reappear and Denna is retroactively edited out.

I highly recommend Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy and the subsequent stand alone novels in the same universe for more of the (anti-)Fantasy genre.
 
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