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(NPR)   New study shows that 8 out of 10 young adults in the "Facebook Generation"--who are between the ages of 16 and 29--have read at least one book in the past year. Unfortunately, it was probably Twilight   (npr.org) divider line 134
    More: PSA, Facebook Generation, Facebook, American Life Project  
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1306 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Oct 2012 at 10:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-23 08:42:02 AM  
Ohhh at least one book, eh? Pace yourselves, kids.
 
2012-10-23 09:08:40 AM  
"America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong" - way to lower the bar, NPR. One book a year is not strong, it's pathetic.
 
2012-10-23 09:34:37 AM  
And that's compared to about 7 in 10 adults in general, American adults. So, they're reading - they're more likely to read, and they're also a little more likely to be using their library."

And unfortunately, this was probably 50 Shades of Grey
 
2012-10-23 09:47:08 AM  
One book? I shiat one book a year out. Like literally, on the shiatter.

My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year. I'm closer to 10-15.

Call me when you match that.
 
2012-10-23 10:01:46 AM  

bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.


How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?
 
2012-10-23 10:08:52 AM  

sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?


Well for one, he listens to audiobooks to and from work.

Besides, a fast reader can consume a good-sized book in 10-12 hours. Consider that many people watch TV an average of I dunno 4-5 hrs a night? It's not that hard to do.

I definitely take more of a week or two to get through something.
 
2012-10-23 10:08:56 AM  
In this thread: A bunch old assholes claiming that one book is not enough and failing to realize that it's more than their cohort is currently reading.
 
2012-10-23 10:10:01 AM  
Ugh, why are they reading such drivel when there are novelizations of the Firefly and Dr. Who series to be read endlessly. Also, RA Salvatore's classic masterpieces about Drow elves! Iweep that this generation will never know the classic literature of Tracy Weis and Hickman.

sweetmelissa31:
How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.
 
2012-10-23 10:11:30 AM  
I'm apart of this "Facebook generation," and I personally have read 5 books this past year, most of them being 500+ pages.


/love to read
 
2012-10-23 10:13:32 AM  
What is the general consensus on audiobooks? Do you count listening to audiobooks as reading?

Me, personally, I do not; and this is coming from someone who knocks over a dozen or so audiobooks a year.
 
2012-10-23 10:13:48 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: Ugh, why are they reading such drivel when there are novelizations of the Firefly and Dr. Who series to be read endlessly. Also, RA Salvatore's classic masterpieces about Drow elves! Iweep that this generation will never know the classic literature of Tracy Weis and Hickman.

sweetmelissa31: How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.


lol
 
2012-10-23 10:13:53 AM  

sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?


I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.
 
2012-10-23 10:14:55 AM  
Hmmm... my daughter is 14 and a half and is a furious reader. New "Artemis Fowle" book? Buy it on Satuday morning, have it done Saturday evening. And no, she doesn't have a 'Facebook' account (but does have an email account as she needed one for high school). So I guess she isn't 'Facebook' generation?

Son is 11 and likes to read almost as much. The fact that my degree is English Lit. and my wife's is Archaeology means that it is a very 'pro-book' household to begin with.
 
2012-10-23 10:15:59 AM  
Remember the halycon days when book snobs made fun of kids and/or adults for reading the Harry Potter books? I remember those days.
 
2012-10-23 10:16:43 AM  
After working in a bookstore for the past decade, let me just say that whatever works to get them to read, do it. If it's Twilight....okay (I hated it). Honestly, there is nothing better in this world than having a small child telling you all about their favorite books.
 
2012-10-23 10:17:00 AM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.


I'm in the "facebook" generation and I certainly "know how to read." I like classic Russian literature, and those books often take me a month to digest. I don't really see the point of trying to go faster, because you probably won't get as much out of each book. Unless you're in some kind of speed reading competition.
 
2012-10-23 10:17:35 AM  
Generations!

TO YOUR BATTLE STATIONS!
 
2012-10-23 10:18:29 AM  
I just took a quick peek at what I read this year (checked my Kindle and Nook accounts). 19 books, and I'm what I consider to be a casual reader.
 
2012-10-23 10:18:36 AM  
It's not a surprise that more young people are reading these days. Between Video games, texting, and the internet there are more reasons for them to be reading than there was for previous generations without those technologies being part of their childhood.
 
2012-10-23 10:18:45 AM  

Raug the Dwarf: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.


Same for me. E-readers really make things much easier.
 
2012-10-23 10:18:57 AM  

sweetmelissa31: SockMonkeyHolocaust: It's easy when you know how to read. No, not look at words and run your eyes along them. Read. Digest. Think about. You get faster with a lot of practice. Also, having a near-complete run of Pocket Classics doesn't hurt.

I'm in the "facebook" generation and I certainly "know how to read." I like classic Russian literature, and those books often take me a month to digest. I don't really see the point of trying to go faster, because you probably won't get as much out of each book. Unless you're in some kind of speed reading competition.


Don't feed it.
 
2012-10-23 10:22:24 AM  
*looks at shelf of the Fark book, Maddox book, both of Livestock's books, What White People Like Volumes I through XII, the Onion book, everything Steven Colbert wrote and the novelization of 'Snakes on A Plane'*

Yeah, you could say I am not the average slackjawed sheeple afraid of the printed word. My kindle has at least 200 to 300 short stories of the Steam Punk genre.
 
2012-10-23 10:26:20 AM  

TheTrashcanMan: I'm apart of this "Facebook generation," and I personally have read 5 books this past year, most of them being 500+ pages.


/love to read


Reading is boring as fark to me, and I've read 4 books already this year. Plus I've listened to another 3. If I weren't making money I wouldn't do it though cause books and book files are a little expensive and assume you can't find a cheaper means of entertainment.

inb4 going to a library. Yeah sure, those are great when you don't like fiction. I'd rather own it anyways.
 
2012-10-23 10:26:26 AM  
E-reader + public library with e-book collection = massive amounts of free books without ever having to leave my home.

If you don't have an e-reader you don't know what you're missing.
 
2012-10-23 10:27:16 AM  

sweetmelissa31: I'm in the "facebook" generation and I certainly "know how to read." I like classic Russian literature, and those books often take me a month to digest. I don't really see the point of trying to go faster, because you probably won't get as much out of each book. Unless you're in some kind of speed reading competition.


Ok, well then different people read at different speeds. You're just slower than others. I went through a classic Russian lit phase and it did take a little longer because reading the historical context of each story and reading about the authors were necessary. You're certainly not going to blast through Brothers Karamazov as fast as you are something like Blood Meridian or the teleplay for the Jurassic Bark episode of 'Futurama'.

FreetardoRivera:

Don't feed it.


I am going to take exception with this. Not everything you disagree with is a troll. Go be one of those people that announce what color you're farkying someone or that you have never used your ignore list UNTIL NOW if you have to be one of those kind of people.
 
2012-10-23 10:31:09 AM  

naughtyrev: "America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong" - way to lower the bar, NPR. One book a year is not strong, it's pathetic.


I'd rather have a friend who reads at least one book a year, than NONE in ten years. Hell, it's nice to hear about what somebody read, if even it was the only book they ever read. You sounds nerdy.
 
2012-10-23 10:32:31 AM  
Or Harry Potter. The new liberal smugness: The movie was better.
 
2012-10-23 10:32:47 AM  

bdub77: One book? I shiat one book a year out. Like literally, on the shiatter.

My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year. I'm closer to 10-15.

Call me when you match that.


What's your number? I work offshore 28 days at a time, 9 months out of the year and generally go through a book about every 2-3 days...., not including when I'm flying or otherwise in transit...

/13 hour flights and an ereader go so WELL together!!!
 
2012-10-23 10:33:08 AM  
Can they read books with real words or just the ones printed in text speak?
 
2012-10-23 10:33:13 AM  
I am in that age group, and in the past year I have read about 7 books

/It was a slow year
//Did about 30 last year
 
2012-10-23 10:34:05 AM  
I am also in that age group, and I'm at 54 books.
 
2012-10-23 10:35:33 AM  
I've read over 100 books between June and August of various lengths and genres (including Twilight just so I can say I actually finished it, and without the aid of booze, as the last attempt at it I gave up at 400 pp and 26 oz of Dark Rum. How my ereader didn't end up smashed, I don't know.)

I'm 27, do I get prize or something?

/read Ulysses and Gone With the Wind back to back this past summer
//also read a lot of "crap" too, such as Stranger in a Strange Land, hippies suck
 
2012-10-23 10:35:48 AM  

LeafyGreens: Raug the Dwarf: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

I read a book every three to four days. Usually in the 350-400 page range.

Same for me. E-readers really make things much easier.


I'm not even using an e-reader. I had a friend that used to own a bookstore. When she went out of business, I ended up with quite a bit of the inventory. Lucked out on that deal, I can tell you.
 
2012-10-23 10:35:48 AM  
I used to plow through 5-10 books a month when I was younger. Now, I'm lucky if I get to read a book or 2 a month with all the stuff I have going on.

My wife, on the other hand, reads prodigiously. She reads faster and retains more information from books than any other person that I know or heard of. She's the reason one of the rooms in our house is a Library.
 
2012-10-23 10:38:28 AM  
Doesn't matter if it's Twilight, 50 Shades of Grey, or a birdcage liner (NY Times), reading > watching TV or spending time on some faux news webpage.

/Not FARK... FauxNEWS
//OK, maybe FARK too.
 
2012-10-23 10:38:36 AM  

kendelrio: bdub77: One book? I shiat one book a year out. Like literally, on the shiatter.

My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year. I'm closer to 10-15.

Call me when you match that.

What's your number? I work offshore 28 days at a time, 9 months out of the year and generally go through a book about every 2-3 days...., not including when I'm flying or otherwise in transit...

/13 hour flights and an ereader go so WELL together!!!


LOL. I meant call me when your study shows 8 out of 10 young adults read more than 30 books a year.
 
2012-10-23 10:38:42 AM  

bdub77: sweetmelissa31: bdub77: My friend reads anywhere from 50-100 books a year.

How is it even possible to read 100 adult-sized books per year and absorb any information from them? One book every 3-4 days. Does your friend not work or do anything else?

Well for one, he listens to audiobooks to and from work.

Besides, a fast reader can consume a good-sized book in 10-12 hours. Consider that many people watch TV an average of I dunno 4-5 hrs a night? It's not that hard to do.

I definitely take more of a week or two to get through something.


Well, it really comes down to the length of the book, spacing, and font size.

Some 200 to 300 page books have very generous spacing and font -- clearly the publisher wanted it to be over 200 pages. Books like that I can bang out in two to three days.

Something like Passage to Power is a 600 page densely spaced book -- the audio version is 32+ hours. To finish that in less than a week you need to be reading it four or five hours a day, at least. It took me about three weeks reading anywhere from 30 minutes to two hours a day. And lets say you're doing to the audio version -- to complete it in seven days you'd have to listen for over 4.5 hours a day.
 
2012-10-23 10:40:03 AM  
So far, I have read through 22 books this year. An even mix of fiction and non-fiction, plus a couple of favorites that I decided I hadn't read in awhile. That's pretty average for me.

My daughter is in the 6th grade. She is required to read 2 books every month. That's pretty good, considering they have to be chapter books on her level or they don't count toward the goal.
 
2012-10-23 10:40:56 AM  

thecpt: TheTrashcanMan: I'm apart of this "Facebook generation," and I personally have read 5 books this past year, most of them being 500+ pages.


/love to read

Reading is boring as fark to me, and I've read 4 books already this year. Plus I've listened to another 3. If I weren't making money I wouldn't do it though cause books and book files are a little expensive and assume you can't find a cheaper means of entertainment.

inb4 going to a library. Yeah sure, those are great when you don't like fiction. I'd rather own it anyways.


I probably would have read more, but I also have a full time job, just graduated college, and have hobbies. I read when I can.
 
2012-10-23 10:41:42 AM  
Since this is a book thread, can anyone recommend books on the eastern front? I've just finished up a book on Kursk and was thinking of picking up something on Barbarossa. Glantz seems to be the author to go with but I would like suggestions.
 
2012-10-23 10:41:52 AM  
I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.
 
2012-10-23 10:48:03 AM  

bibli0phile: Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.


That's what I always try to convince people of. I finally convinced my nephew to start reading by introducing him to The Looking Glass Wars. When he was done, he asked "What's next." I've been trying to keep him reading all year. So far, so good.
 
2012-10-23 10:49:05 AM  
Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?
 
2012-10-23 10:53:05 AM  

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


Hmm, how about some classic noir by Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett? Herman Wouk is also good. I'm also partial to John Le Carre.
 
2012-10-23 10:54:49 AM  

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


Sci-fi military? Hmm.

Well, first off, Asimov. Vernor Vinge. Ender's Game (even though I think Orson Scott Card is a turd nugget of a human being).

If you want some tougher reading, Philip K Dick is great. Larry Niven I've heard good things but haven't read.

I don't really read Ludlum so I can't really say much there. You're never hurt reading some classic books either though - Dostoevsky is great. From there you could try Solzhenitsyn's book about Russian gulags, which is dark but interesting.
 
2012-10-23 10:54:51 AM  

BohemianGraham: mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?

Hmm, how about some classic noir by Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett? Herman Wouk is also good. I'm also partial to John Le Carre.


Thanks, I'll see what our town library has from these authors.
 
2012-10-23 10:56:22 AM  

mainstreet62: Can anyone recommend some books for me?

Just to give you all a taste of what I like: I'm a big fan of Robert Ludlum's books, including the Covert One series (which incorporates a bunch of biomedical info), written by several authors after Ludlum's death but using his style. I also like Dale Brown, which is a bunch of sci-fi military stuff.

I'm about to read Steve Jobs' bio. One of the most successful people in history (like him or hate him), should be a good read. But after that I don't know where to focus my attention.

Ideas?


May I recommend reading a few history books.
 
2012-10-23 10:56:28 AM  

bibli0phile: I'm not going to criticize young people for reading Twilight, or anything else, for that matter. The point is, they're reading, and if they find they enjoy it, they may move on to other books as well.

I once had a friend who said she hated to read. So I went out and bought her the trashiest bodice-ripping romance novels I could find (this being the days before erotica was mainstream enough to be widely available in book stores) and it worked. She was hooked. She eventually moved on to other genres, though she still enjoys the occasional romance novel.

It's why I don't criticize the Fifty Shades phenomenon. Same results: more people reading. And that's not a bad thing.


I generally agree, my only concern is what it teaches publishers and writers. My fear is that we get flooded with shiat (why write or publish compelling, original, quality work when you can squirt out fan-fic based on poorly written crap in the first place and make huge money?) and have a limited selection of quality to pick from. Thankfully my predictions here in the literary world have been wrong, and I hope that trend continues.

A friend of mine commented recently that there is a very large amount of modern writing which reads as if it's been written with the hopes of being optioned for TV or Film. I think the example she used was The Hunger Games. I just hope this is a passing trend.
 
2012-10-23 10:56:40 AM  

bdub77: Sci-fi military? Hmm.


It doesn't have to be strictly that genre. I prefer fast paced books that have a fair amount of depth.

I'll try some of your suggestions as well. Thank you. :-)
 
2012-10-23 10:57:39 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: May I recommend reading a few history books.


I'm guessing you don't agree with the bolded statement.

How about in MODERN history? Better? :-P
 
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