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(Wikipedia)   Subby would like to learn a programming language for a new career. Which ones are best for an entry level job? (Some experience with Java, C++, and Verilog)   (en.wikipedia.org) divider line 64
    More: Advice, entry-level job, list of programming languages  
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198 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 22 Oct 2012 at 3:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-22 11:26:59 AM
Can't got wrong with a real language like C++. C/C++ are essentially the prototype syntax for an entire family (including Java and C#).
 
2012-10-22 11:37:05 AM
Ada!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_programming_language

/Only seriously consider Ada if you want to work programming for the aerospace industry
//no one else really uses it.
///Was the required language when I was in college
////I don't program anyway, so meh
 
2012-10-22 11:39:49 AM
It depends entirely on what your new career will be.
Embedded or big application stuff: C,C#,C++ etc.
Web: javascript, and make certain to learn JQuery and Node.js too.

/writes Objective C all day long
//wishes he was writing JS
 
2012-10-22 11:50:52 AM
Malbolge. More than anything, employers want to know how clever you are, and this will set you apart from the pack.
 
2012-10-22 11:53:59 AM
Java and .NET (C#, NOT Visual Basic) are your best bets with a request that general.

What kind of career are you looking for exactly?
Mobile apps: You're locked in to objective C for iOS and Java for android. Best to learn both so you can make ports of your apps. Don't even worry about Windows Phone.
Device drivers, and other low level stuff: C

Web apps are where I live, so I have more details there.
Back end: Java or .NET. If you go the .NET route, make it C# not that terrible Visual Basic abomination. Learn up on the new MVC4 stuff and you'll have plenty to talk about in interviews.
Front end: Javascript. HTML5 is buzzwordy hype. Learn enough to put it on your resume and talk about it during interviews. jQuery is your friend.

PHP is still common in some web development jobs, but I haven't met anybody who isn't an idiot that likes it.
Python as well, for some reason. It reminds me of the days when the web was driven by Perl scripts and Java applets, so I hope that trend will die. If you do go python, Django is a good framework.
Haven't seen as much Ruby on Rails around lately.

You'll also need to pair python or node.js with an obnoxious lust for NoSQL technologies and the ability to name them without knowing what they do. "I installed mongodb with redis on my hadoop cluster so I could build a webscale GUI interface using jQuery to track the killer's IP address." "You're hired!"
 
2012-10-22 12:02:07 PM

solaufein: Ada!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_programming_language

/Only seriously consider Ada if you want to work programming for the aerospace industry
//no one else really uses it.
///Was the required language when I was in college
////I don't program anyway, so meh


Well, if we're going to provide these sorts of recommendations...
FORTRAN!

It is one of the three languages I learned in college. Remarkably, I only graduated two years ago, not 30 years ago. It's still apparently widely used in atmospheric sciences, which is why the meteorology department at PSU teaches it.

/I never used the C++ I learned, but I still do use the MATLAB I learned.
 
2012-10-22 12:04:05 PM
C# if you want to work in the Microsoft world.

Here is a link to a free copy of Visual Studio Express.

As much as I don't like Java, it's also very prevalent.
 
2012-10-22 12:04:16 PM
Also, good developers (especially at a junior level) can learn a new language and framework on the fly. If you know your shiat the core concepts are the same and Google can fill in the gaps between languages.

Smart employers know that, but a lot of employers (even the smart ones) hire recruiters who don't. Hiring managers get pressured to write a job description that contains relevant buzz words, then the recruiter looks at your resume for some match of those buzz words.

I almost want to suggest just listing every language you can write Hello World in, but some interviewers will turn you down on the spot if you list something on your resume and don't know actually it.
 
2012-10-22 12:09:16 PM
Interviewers are also going to ask you my favorite stupid question, "tell me what you know about design patterns", and they'll say the word design patterns with some mysticism like it's the holy grail of computer science knowledge, even though their code is just as hacked together as it would have been if the Gang of Four had never existed. Read Head First Design Patterns so you don't get caught off guard by that one. They're looking for you to just pick a couple random patterns and describe them--mostly just to verify that you've read a book about it, I think.

If they ask what your favorite design pattern is, tell them they're an idiot and you should be using the pattern that gets the job done, not the one that you have an unfounded affinity for. Be wary of the guy who thinks clever code to solve a simple problem is a good thing.
 
2012-10-22 12:15:46 PM

solaufein: /Only seriously consider Ada if you want to work programming for the aerospace industry


During my job interview fresh out of school I was asked if I heard of Ada. I told them we talked about it in a historical fashion. Then I found out the program still used Ada'83 and I still got the job. Sometimes I like Ada, but other times I wish for the flexibility of C.
 
2012-10-22 12:22:17 PM
If you already have experience with C++ and java, C# should be an easy step, and is useful in a lot of places. It's getting some traction outside of the microsoft world via mono, as well.

That said, if you want to prove your badass chops as a programmer, learn brainfark.
 
2012-10-22 12:34:42 PM

solaufein: Ada!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_programming_language

/Only seriously consider Ada if you want to work programming for the aerospace industry
//no one else really uses it.
///Was the required language when I was in college
////I don't program anyway, so meh


Ada! Haven't thought about that language since college. It's not a bad language to learn, it's kind of like Latin. You'll never actually use it but it has all the nuts and bolts of more advanced languages,

Assembly code is where it's at.
 
2012-10-22 12:46:09 PM
I feel you subby. I have some very basic programming experience, but would like to learn more myself if only for shiats and giggles. Anyone have a review of codeacademy? I've been to the page, but haven't started any of the tutorials yet.
 
2012-10-22 12:54:05 PM

Gig103: During my job interview fresh out of school I was asked if I heard of Ada. I told them we talked about it in a historical fashion


Time for nostalgia and a CSB:
I took a pretty good intro to CS class that was basically "learn a new dead language every week". ADA, BASIC, COBOL, FORTRAN, LISP, etc. If it was in all caps, that class covered it. It did a good job of teaching the fundamentals for the newbies as well as giving those of us who knew most of it something to be impressed by.

A big chunk of the grade consisted of online quizzes that would grade the homework via Javscript, then submit the end grade as a percentage to the server. Somehow I always ended up getting everything right...
Crazy professor actually built a LISP interpreter in Javascript though. The source code for that blew my mind a little bit.
 
2012-10-22 01:05:03 PM
Smalltalk if you're a sadist.
Java if you're lazy.
C# if you're both.
 
2012-10-22 02:05:44 PM

serial_crusher: Crazy professor actually built a LISP interpreter in Javascript though. The source code for that blew my mind a little bit.


LISP people are batty. I took an AI course which used LISP and our professor had written a LISP-to-Lego Mindstorm compiler on a grant. I actually wish I had been able to take a course like you talked about.
 
2012-10-22 02:07:13 PM

urger: It depends entirely on what your new career will be.


This. Out yourself, subby.
 
2012-10-22 02:09:21 PM
The best language to learn for an entry-level programming job is Hindi.
 
2012-10-22 02:10:54 PM

Jclark666: The best language to learn for an entry-level programming job is Hindi.


Win
 
2012-10-22 02:22:18 PM
In my shop? J2EE/Java EE, javascript, .net, sql scripting
 
2012-10-22 02:27:31 PM

HenryFnord: J2EE/Java EE


I love Java's progression of version numbers. From
Java
Java 2
Java 2 version 1.4
Java 2 version 1.4.2
Java 2 version 1.5 (aka Java 5)
 
2012-10-22 02:39:32 PM
Whatever language you learn, there's a fairly large community out there dedicated to the idea that it's the worst language ever.
 
2012-10-22 02:46:19 PM
I would learn Python and LISP. You want to stay current in the field of programming.
 
2012-10-22 03:07:21 PM

ThatGuyGreg: urger: It depends entirely on what your new career will be.

This. Out yourself, subby.


I just wanted to learn something that would get my foot in the door at a lot of places. Not quite a particular career, maybe web dev, but just something that was common in the business world. Where I live there are plenty of options of what I can do (just north of NYC).

I did learn C++ in a couple of courses, and I thought C was the easiest thing ever. I just wanted to know how much of these do I need to learn, or if I should learn a new language in its entirety.

Also what to use to self teach it.
 
2012-10-22 03:18:15 PM
LISP
 
2012-10-22 03:22:29 PM

Luthien's Tempest: solaufein: Ada!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_programming_language

/Only seriously consider Ada if you want to work programming for the aerospace industry
//no one else really uses it.
///Was the required language when I was in college
////I don't program anyway, so meh

Well, if we're going to provide these sorts of recommendations...
FORTRAN!

It is one of the three languages I learned in college. Remarkably, I only graduated two years ago, not 30 years ago. It's still apparently widely used in atmospheric sciences, which is why the meteorology department at PSU teaches it.

/I never used the C++ I learned, but I still do use the MATLAB I learned.


All the FORTRAN and COBOL engineers are retiring and not as many schools continued to teach the language. Thus, there are openings for these older languages for big companies that still have backbones programmed in these languages.
 
2012-10-22 03:28:59 PM
Learn Objective C and then bring along an ipad to the interview to wow them with the pointless eyecandy of your apps... also try to use the following buzzwords as often as possible: big data, cloud, virtualization, ass-banditry.
 
2012-10-22 03:33:43 PM
10 INPUT "How many reasons do you need to conclude that the only language worth studying is BASIC?" X
20 PRINT "Ok, here you go:" X " reasons why you should study BASIC":
20 LET Y=1
30 IF Y > X THEN GOTO 110
40 LET Z= RAND(1,3)
50 IF Z=1 THEN LET Z$="AWESOME"
60 IF Z=2 THEN LET Z$="NIFTY"
70 IF Z=3 THEN LET Z$="THE KIND OF LANGUAGE THAT WILL LET YOU PULL ALL KINDS OF TOP-SHELF TAIL AT BARS"
80 PRINT Y". Because BASIC is "Z$"."
90 Y=Y+1
100 GOTO 30
110 INPUT "So there. Satisfied? (Y/N)" A$
120 IF A$="Y" THEN PRINT "We're going to get along just fine."
130 IF A$"Y" THEN PRINT "Well then fark you, buddy."
140 END
 
2012-10-22 03:42:58 PM
Learn LPC, code MUDs, drift off into relative obscurity. (Bonus points if you learn how to use the LISP-esque lambda closures if they're compiler supported.)
 
2012-10-22 03:49:08 PM

HulkHands: Luthien's Tempest: solaufein: Ada!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_programming_language

/Only seriously consider Ada if you want to work programming for the aerospace industry
//no one else really uses it.
///Was the required language when I was in college
////I don't program anyway, so meh

Well, if we're going to provide these sorts of recommendations...
FORTRAN!

It is one of the three languages I learned in college. Remarkably, I only graduated two years ago, not 30 years ago. It's still apparently widely used in atmospheric sciences, which is why the meteorology department at PSU teaches it.

/I never used the C++ I learned, but I still do use the MATLAB I learned.

All the FORTRAN and COBOL engineers are retiring and not as many schools continued to teach the language. Thus, there are openings for these older languages for big companies that still have backbones programmed in these languages.


Climate models, among other things, are programmed in FORTRAN, which is why my classmates and I were taught. I called my dad on day one of class to verify that it was what he learned in college - so I could tell how ancient it was (it's his own fault he raised us to be smart asses). There weren't a lot of texts available, so the professor told us that anything he felt should be looked up and not taught should be googled (which was most stuff).

I just like whining about it, though, to be honest. It makes stuff so much harder than it needs to be, due to its archaic nature. I recently tried some programming in FORTRAN for the first time in a couple years. Took me ages to figure out why it wasn't running. Because I had code within the first 7 columns of each line of code (how I forgot that maddening feature, I will never know). I like MATLAB much better even though it's much harder to find out if you've made a mistake, because it will try to fix them for you (sometimes well, sometimes not so much).
 
2012-10-22 03:55:02 PM
Go to a website like dice.com and search for programming jobs. You can see what languages are most in demand, but I'd say C/C++ and Java are probably good bets.
 
2012-10-22 04:12:18 PM

Adalius: Learn LPC, code MUDs, drift off into relative obscurity. (Bonus points if you learn how to use the LISP-esque lambda closures if they're compiler supported.)


Most people don't know that the original submission queue for Fark was coded in LPC.
 
2012-10-22 04:15:51 PM

Jclark666: Adalius: Learn LPC, code MUDs, drift off into relative obscurity. (Bonus points if you learn how to use the LISP-esque lambda closures if they're compiler supported.)

Most people don't know that the original submission queue for Fark was coded in LPC.


Most people don't remember when Drew used to code in LPC either. Makes me feel old as dirt.
 
2012-10-22 04:55:20 PM
while(sober) {++beer;}

my favorite new Fark tagline phrase
 
2012-10-22 04:56:49 PM

Kazan: Can't got wrong with a real language like C++. C/C++ are essentially the prototype syntax for an entire family (including Java and C#).


2nded. Become proficient at C++ and then learn one of the more modern language and see how easy things can be and then go back to C++ because everyone and their mom knows Java these days
 
2012-10-22 04:58:40 PM

Mugato: Ada! Haven't thought about that language since college


You go to the University of Northern Iowa as well? If not, did you use this book: "Programming and Problem Solving with ADA"? If you used this book, one of the authors was the department head while I was taking classes there.
 
2012-10-22 04:59:26 PM
Chinese.
 
2012-10-22 05:04:54 PM
There is no other programming language as awesome as BASIC
 
2012-10-22 05:05:34 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Chinese.


I know Chinese programmers. They program in English.

/typing in Chinese practically requires autocorrect.
 
2012-10-22 06:03:27 PM

serial_crusher: PHP is still common in some web development jobs, but I haven't met anybody who isn't an idiot that likes it.


PHP, like the older languages that inspired it's syntax, will let you be a complete and total moron.

smart people use it, you just don't notice it.

serial_crusher: design patterns


my favorite is my last employer's C++ code was written by "wizard programmers!" ... i took one look at the codebase and concluded "these jackasses read design patterns, DIDN'T UNDERSTAND IT, then misapplied it all over the place. and my coworkers aren't smart enough to understand this, or don't care enough to point this out"

thecpt: and I thought C was the easiest thing ever


*twitch*

let's test that knowledge. what is the one legitimate excuse to ever see GOTO used in C code, and what C++ features are you trying to emulate/compensate for the lack of by doing so.

solaufein: Mugato: Ada! Haven't thought about that language since college

You go to the University of Northern Iowa as well? If not, did you use this book: "Programming and Problem Solving with ADA"? If you used this book, one of the authors was the department head while I was taking classes there.


i will also point out that employers who want Ada - like Rockwell Collins - expect you to not know it. if you've heard of it they're surprised. if you know it they're thrilled.
 
2012-10-22 07:42:57 PM
LOLCODE is designed to resemble the speech of lolcats. The following is the "hello world" example:


HAI
CAN HAS STDIO?
VISIBLE "HAI WORLD!"
KTHXBYE
 
2012-10-22 08:10:25 PM
Take it to /.

NERD

/programmer
 
2012-10-22 08:16:50 PM

Kazan: thecpt: and I thought C was the easiest thing ever

*twitch*

let's test that knowledge. what is the one legitimate excuse to ever see GOTO used in C code, and what C++ features are you trying to emulate/compensate for the lack of by doing so.




Okay my statement was specific to programming a microcontroller for an automated arm. I didn't learn much about how to use it, but everything I wanted to do for it was simple.
 
2012-10-22 08:25:03 PM
Learn Cobol.

It ain't sexy but mainframes aren't going away and Cobol programmers make great money. Young people don't want to learn it because it isn't cool.

You know what's cool? Making the mortgage and car payments on time.
 
2012-10-22 08:54:57 PM

cabbyman: Learn Cobol.

It ain't sexy but mainframes aren't going away and Cobol programmers make great money. Young people don't want to learn it because it isn't cool.

You know what's cool? Making the mortgage and car payments on time.


Sounds pretty responsible and lame to me, Bob. Which makes it ironic. The hipsters will love it.
 
2012-10-22 09:12:32 PM
While knowing a specific language is useful, in that your ramp-up time will be less, it's more important to know the general principles of program design. When should you use a tree vs a hash table, and why? What are the advantages and disadvantages of various sort algorithms? Things like that. I've been programming for over 20 years in 6 companies, and in each of my jobs I've had to learn a new programming language or languages.
 
2012-10-23 12:29:09 AM
Scheme.
 
2012-10-23 12:57:25 AM
Stay away from any ESQL-C variants, including Pro*C (all are C with embedded SQL). Those jobs are being off-shored by the tens of thousands. Seriously.

C++ and Java are both in high demand these days. A few scripting languages wouldn't hurt, either. And C# (C sharp) is M$'s alternative to Java. It certainly couldn't hurt to learn that.
 
2012-10-23 01:43:46 AM

thecpt: Kazan: thecpt: and I thought C was the easiest thing ever

*twitch*

let's test that knowledge. what is the one legitimate excuse to ever see GOTO used in C code, and what C++ features are you trying to emulate/compensate for the lack of by doing so.



Okay my statement was specific to programming a microcontroller for an automated arm. I didn't learn much about how to use it, but everything I wanted to do for it was simple.


good :D

normally when i hear people say "C is really easy" they're leaking memory all over the place. so i poke them
 
2012-10-23 07:25:34 AM

Uzzah: 10 INPUT "How many reasons do you need to conclude that the only language worth studying is BASIC?" X
20 PRINT "Ok, here you go:" X " reasons why you should study BASIC":
20 LET Y=1
30 IF Y > X THEN GOTO 110
40 LET Z= RAND(1,3)
50 IF Z=1 THEN LET Z$="AWESOME"
60 IF Z=2 THEN LET Z$="NIFTY"
70 IF Z=3 THEN LET Z$="THE KIND OF LANGUAGE THAT WILL LET YOU PULL ALL KINDS OF TOP-SHELF TAIL AT BARS"
80 PRINT Y". Because BASIC is "Z$"."
90 Y=Y+1
100 GOTO 30
110 INPUT "So there. Satisfied? (Y/N)" A$
120 IF A$="Y" THEN PRINT "We're going to get along just fine."
130 IF A$"Y" THEN PRINT "Well then fark you, buddy."
140 END


You could have saved some cycles there by stacking some of the operands in cascades. That said, I don't feel that any BASIC programme can be considered sophisticated unless it contains at least one GOSUB.
 
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