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(Lexington Herald Leader)   Family discovers that their cool little doorstop is old .. about 4 billion years old   (kentucky.com) divider line 63
    More: Spiffy, meteorites, Eastern Kentucky University, Pineville, EKU Department of Physics  
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9527 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Oct 2012 at 3:03 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-20 08:50:40 AM
' "To have something in your possession that's that old, it's just unreal," Lewis said '

I suspect any rock you pick up can be that old...
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-10-20 09:02:56 AM
I suspect any rock you pick up can be that old...

Old rocks are rare. The Earth recycles its crust regularly. Few parts of the surface are over a billion years old. The oldest minerals are tiny crystals with high melting points. They are several billion years old but too small to be "rocks."
 
2012-10-20 10:48:37 AM
It will probably eventually be sold off to pay for a creation science wing.

/no faith in humanity.
//not even slashes.
 
2012-10-20 11:51:06 AM
I've got a meteor my dad gave me a few years back. It's about 4 inches long, but it's awesome cause it's got a conical shape due to how it entered the earth's atmosphere (the geologist said instead of tumbling in the air, it went straight down like a bullet). It's a heavy little farker too.
 
2012-10-20 12:19:25 PM
This is seriously cool. I would love to have a meteorite. Had a blast visiting Meteor Crater last summer.
They actually let you touch the largest piece of meteorite that they were able to recover. It was bigger than me and weighed around 1400lbs.
I was so excited to have my picture taken with it. It was like meeting a celebrity.
 
2012-10-20 12:35:07 PM
I read another story of a guy finding a meteorite used as a doorstop, I think it was in a small-town sheriff's office. When the guy asked if he could take it, the sheriff said yes, but only if he brought him another doorstop.
 
2012-10-20 12:37:10 PM
"Nothing like this occurs in nature," Cook said.

... this guy's a scientist?
 
2012-10-20 12:45:51 PM

Via Infinito: This is seriously cool. I would love to have a meteorite. Had a blast visiting Meteor Crater last summer.
They actually let you touch the largest piece of meteorite that they were able to recover. It was bigger than me and weighed around 1400lbs.
I was so excited to have my picture taken with it. It was like meeting a celebrity.


CSS
 
2012-10-20 12:53:10 PM
Impossible.

The Earth is only 6,000 years old.
 
Pud [TotalFark]
2012-10-20 01:43:49 PM
t0.gstatic.com
 
2012-10-20 01:49:19 PM
I got dirt in my yard that is that old.
 
2012-10-20 03:04:05 PM

scottydoesntknow: I've got a meteor my dad gave me a few years back. It's about 4 inches long, but it's awesome cause it's got a conical shape due to how it entered the earth's atmosphere (the geologist said instead of tumbling in the air, it went straight down like a bullet). It's a heavy little farker too.


Your description reminded me of the jet from a conical shaped charge, like so:

i1225.photobucket.com

But is suspect that you meant something wider.
 
2012-10-20 03:13:40 PM
Every natural diamond is at least 900 million years old. Most are between 1 billion and 3 billion years old.
 
2012-10-20 03:19:08 PM
I like the URL: http://www.kentucky.com/2012/10/18/2376442/eku-given-meteorite-found- in-cow.html

Was the cow hit by the meteorite? Did the cow swallow it? Is it a space cow, feeding on meteors? If it's a space cow, did it produce the Milky Way?
 
2012-10-20 03:24:08 PM
j.wigflip.com
 
2012-10-20 03:28:45 PM

MoronLessOff: [j.wigflip.com image 480x640]


Love it!

/wish it were that big...
 
2012-10-20 03:38:32 PM

Via Infinito: This is seriously cool. I would love to have a meteorite. Had a blast visiting Meteor Crater last summer.
They actually let you touch the largest piece of meteorite that they were able to recover. It was bigger than me and weighed around 1400lbs.
I was so excited to have my picture taken with it. It was like meeting a celebrity.


Years ago, when I drove cross-country to where I live today, it was a personal thrill to visit Meteor Crater. And, holy crap, pictures don't do it justice.
 
2012-10-20 03:41:17 PM
A meteorite once landed right at my father's feet. It was amazing, it had layers, the top of it looked like it had bubbled and popped from heat, and weighed a ton, despite only being a little thing.

His first reaction was to sell it.

What an asshole.
 
2012-10-20 03:41:23 PM

Via Infinito: This is seriously cool. I would love to have a meteorite. Had a blast visiting Meteor Crater last summer.
They actually let you touch the largest piece of meteorite that they were able to recover. It was bigger than me and weighed around 1400lbs.
I was so excited to have my picture taken with it. It was like meeting a celebrity.


When were you there? I was there around 4th of July. Went that vocano crater and ice cave too. The volcano crater is neat to see if you are into those kinds of things (which I am). The ice cave doesn't take long to see, but it's pretty trippy. The surface was over 100F, but down a few steps, and there's a frozen lake (okay, pool). Pretty crazy.

images.fineartamerica.com

www.icecaves.com


us.123rf.com
lava on the side of I-40 nearby


I don't think people generally appreciate how much of the surface near I-40 in New Mexico is covered in lava.
 
2012-10-20 03:41:38 PM

ZAZ: I suspect any rock you pick up can be that old...

Old rocks are rare. The Earth recycles its crust regularly. Few parts of the surface are over a billion years old. The oldest minerals are tiny crystals with high melting points. They are several billion years old but too small to be "rocks."


Plenty of billion+ year old rocks in my backyard, but I'm surrounded by the Teton Range and not far from the Wind River Range. You must live in one of those flat states.
 
2012-10-20 03:46:50 PM

ModernLuddite: A meteorite once landed right at my father's feet. It was amazing, it had layers, the top of it looked like it had bubbled and popped from heat, and weighed a ton, despite only being a little thing.

His first reaction was to sell it. pick it up and be slowly consumed by alien vegetation.

What an asshole.

 
2012-10-20 03:49:36 PM

SevenizGud:

I don't think people generally appreciate how much of the surface near I-40 in New Mexico is covered in lava.


There is a very large flow that runs along the west side of US 54 also, it starts to the northwest of Carrizozo and runs southwest to White Sands Missile Range. Most of the northeastern side of the missile range is lava flow and mountains.
 
2012-10-20 03:51:44 PM
I thought meteorites were worth a lot of money?
 
2012-10-20 03:55:23 PM
This is funny. My doorstep right now is a giant ball of fossilized squid shiat. A meteorite would be so much cooler, but the expressions are still priceless when someone says "Oh! What an unusual rock, what kind is it?" and I explain.
 
2012-10-20 04:05:48 PM

Spanky_McFarksalot: I thought meteorites were worth a lot of money?


Which may be why the article says the terms of the transfer from family to university were not disclosed.
 
2012-10-20 04:06:44 PM

ZAZ: I suspect any rock you pick up can be that old...

Old rocks are rare. The Earth recycles its crust regularly. Few parts of the surface are over a billion years old. The oldest minerals are tiny crystals with high melting points. They are several billion years old but too small to be "rocks."


Hah! Everything around you is four billion years old. It's just been recycled and remade into different forms over the years.

But, yeah, I know what you mean.
 
2012-10-20 04:23:55 PM

Spanky_McFarksalot: I thought meteorites were worth a lot of money?


only if they're not broken.
 
2012-10-20 04:28:49 PM

kmmontandon: "Nothing like this occurs in nature," Cook said.

... this guy's a scientist?


I noticed his seeming nature=terrestrial paradigm also.
 
2012-10-20 04:44:02 PM

jekxrb: Impossible.

The Earth is only 6,000 years old.


Especially in Kentucky.
 
2012-10-20 05:12:54 PM

PacManDreaming: ZAZ: I suspect any rock you pick up can be that old...

Old rocks are rare. The Earth recycles its crust regularly. Few parts of the surface are over a billion years old. The oldest minerals are tiny crystals with high melting points. They are several billion years old but too small to be "rocks."

Hah! Everything around you is four billion years old. It's just been recycled and remade into different forms over the years.

But, yeah, I know what you mean.


If recycled and remade is the standard, wouldn't everything be closer to 14 billion?
 
2012-10-20 05:13:42 PM

MrPerfectSU: If recycled and remade is the standard, wouldn't everything be closer to 14 billion?


More than likely.
 
2012-10-20 05:19:44 PM

ModernLuddite: A meteorite once landed right at my father's feet. It was amazing, it had layers, the top of it looked like it had bubbled and popped from heat, and weighed a ton, despite only being a little thing.

His first reaction was to sell it.

What an asshole.


It's ok, the only thing in it was meteor shiat

/he saved your life you lunkhead
 
2012-10-20 05:22:41 PM

SevenizGud:

I don't think people generally appreciate how much of the surface near I-40 in New Mexico is covered in lava.


Why anyone would buy pumice in New Mexico is a mystery. You can often just go into your front yard and pick a piece up the size of a basketball.
 
2012-10-20 05:43:17 PM

FormlessOne:
Years ago, when I drove cross-country to where I live today, it was a personal thrill to visit Meteor Crater. And, holy crap, pictures don't do it justice.


I did basically the same thing. We were driving from California to Georgia and I really HAD to see it. We should have timed it better though, because it was late in the day and there was a big shadow on one side of the crater. You're right though. Pictures do NOT do it justice at all.

SevenizGud:
When were you there? I was there around 4th of July. Went that vocano crater and ice cave too. The volcano crater is neat to see if you are into those kinds of things (which I am). The ice cave doesn't take long to see, but it's pretty trippy. The surface was over 100F, but down a few steps, and there's a frozen lake (okay, pool). Pretty crazy.


It was early in August. Maybe Aug 2 or 3. Didn't have a chance anything but the crater and museum, but your pictures are great. Here's a picture I took of the crater when I visited. I should have visited at noon.
i194.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-20 05:46:16 PM

ecmoRandomNumbers: It will probably eventually be sold off to pay for a creation science wing.

/no faith in humanity.
//not even slashes.


Jerry Cook is actually a great physics prof and a funny guy.

/he may have a thing for cold fusion though
//couldn't tell if he was serious
 
2012-10-20 05:56:12 PM

h2oincfs: Spanky_McFarksalot: I thought meteorites were worth a lot of money?

only if they're not broken.


Iseewhatyoudidthere.jpg
 
2012-10-20 06:14:51 PM
Besides, she said, "What am I going to do with it? Throw it back in the flower garden?"

Sell it? Meteorites are pretty valuable.
 
2012-10-20 06:27:38 PM

spelletrader: scottydoesntknow: I've got a meteor my dad gave me a few years back. It's about 4 inches long, but it's awesome cause it's got a conical shape due to how it entered the earth's atmosphere (the geologist said instead of tumbling in the air, it went straight down like a bullet). It's a heavy little farker too.

Your description reminded me of the jet from a conical shaped charge, like so:

[i1225.photobucket.com image 768x1024]

But is suspect that you meant something wider.


I was able to get a picture of it (was at work when I posted):

imageshack.us

It's a cool little piece to talk about. 

/And yes, that's a kangaroo on a boomerang from Australia
 
2012-10-20 06:29:35 PM
The only rock I have (apart from small fossils) which I can date is Ordovician (between 450 and 403 million years ago). It iis dark limestone with a few pink quartz inclusions collected when the streets were being dug up recently. At the time this sediment was laid down, Ottawa (Ontario) was under a deep bay and the bottom was nearly life less. The limestone is nearly black because of a lot of carbon. Climate change and a mass extinction are the most likely causes of the lack of fossils in this layer, as well as the depth of the bay.

Many wonderful marine fossils (including a couple of unknown critters) have been found in the bedrock excavated near where I live. On the way back from my Doctor one day, I saw several really great fossils on the back of a pick-up truck near a new condo dig.

Many of the rocks from the Maritimes where I was born are even older, but rocks this old aren't on the surface everywhere. You have to consult geological maps to find what is available locally, but I like to know something of local plants, animals, geology, etc. Sadly I do not know nearly as much as I think I should.

The Maritimes don't have much from the time of the dinosaurs but they have a lot of earlier life and fill in important stages in evolution of early reptiles and amphibians.

I have been over rock that was originally part of Africa and got left behind when the Atlantic opened. There's some in New England and the Maritimes but gain, you need a map to find it. Zippy the Pinhead had a cartoon about this rock, which sparked my interest in seeing where it could be found.
 
2012-10-20 07:39:16 PM
If recycled and remade is the standard, wouldn't everything be closer to 14 billion?

Yeah, basically all of us and everything is 14 billion years old. Just recycled. Time to renew the driver's license.
 
2012-10-20 07:48:50 PM

scottydoesntknow: spelletrader: scottydoesntknow: I've got a meteor my dad gave me a few years back. It's about 4 inches long, but it's awesome cause it's got a conical shape due to how it entered the earth's atmosphere (the geologist said instead of tumbling in the air, it went straight down like a bullet). It's a heavy little farker too.

Your description reminded me of the jet from a conical shaped charge, like so:

[i1225.photobucket.com image 768x1024]

But is suspect that you meant something wider.

I was able to get a picture of it (was at work when I posted):

[imageshack.us image 850x1133]

It's a cool little piece to talk about. 

/And yes, that's a kangaroo on a boomerang from Australia


That is beautiful, thank you for posting the pic!
 
2012-10-20 08:08:36 PM
Subby must mean the doorstop was unchanged 4 bya. Everything is 13 odd billion years old.

Or so I hear.
 
2012-10-20 08:09:50 PM
Couple disappointed. They wanted to see what they could get for it on Antiques Roadshow.
 
2012-10-20 09:49:07 PM

Via Infinito: FormlessOne:
Years ago, when I drove cross-country to where I live today, it was a personal thrill to visit Meteor Crater. And, holy crap, pictures don't do it justice.

I did basically the same thing. We were driving from California to Georgia and I really HAD to see it. We should have timed it better though, because it was late in the day and there was a big shadow on one side of the crater. You're right though. Pictures do NOT do it justice at all.

SevenizGud:
When were you there? I was there around 4th of July. Went that vocano crater and ice cave too. The volcano crater is neat to see if you are into those kinds of things (which I am). The ice cave doesn't take long to see, but it's pretty trippy. The surface was over 100F, but down a few steps, and there's a frozen lake (okay, pool). Pretty crazy.

It was early in August. Maybe Aug 2 or 3. Didn't have a chance anything but the crater and museum, but your pictures are great. Here's a picture I took of the crater when I visited. I should have visited at noon.
[i194.photobucket.com image 850x565]


When I saw the crater (meteoric one, that is) I really couldn't comprehend how large it was until I saw a feature at the bottom that the tourist literature said was the size of a two-story house. THen the whole thing snapped into perspective. Astonishing.
 
2012-10-21 12:01:50 AM
www.southbayriders.com
 
2012-10-21 12:35:35 AM

RedVentrue: Subby must mean the doorstop was unchanged 4 bya. Everything is 13 odd billion years old.

Or so I hear.


The quarks in the protons, mostly. The assemblies into iron tend to be a bit younger.
 
2012-10-21 12:37:44 AM

Hand Banana: [www.southbayriders.com image 400x267]


Came for this. Thanks.
 
2012-10-21 03:30:28 AM
Everything in the universe is the same frickin' age. Matter can neither be created nor destroyed, only recycled.
 
2012-10-21 06:20:10 AM
Everything is billions of years old.

// everything that's made out of protons, neutrons and electrons.
 
2012-10-21 07:32:25 AM
www.badmovies.org
 
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