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(Movie News)   The real story behind that famous photo at the end of Kubrick's "'The Shining". All airbrush and no play makes Jack a dull boy   (movies.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool, Stanley Kubrick, dull boy, Jack Torrance, tracking shot  
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12876 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Oct 2012 at 10:16 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-20 12:33:37 PM  
3 votes:
with Kubrick even stating that it's proof that Jack was actually a reincarnation of someone who worked at the hotel five decades earlier.

Reincarnation? Thats really lame. I always thought that the picture meant the hotel had sucked Nicholson into it, so he'd be one of the malevolent ghosts there... FOREVER
2012-10-20 02:07:36 PM  
2 votes:

Lollipop165: I never really understood the point of the "sexy" decor in his house and what it was supposed to say about his character. How does "pimping" add anything to the plot?


On one level, I wonder that myself. On another, I'd say that it's meant to say there's nothing special about Scatman's character outside of the "Shine'; that sort of decor was common for lower-middle class single men -black or white- in the 1970s.
2012-10-20 09:46:31 AM  
2 votes:
www.myfacewhen.net

airbrushing photos in the late '70s wasn't a digital process. It involved using an actual airbrush to physically paint over the original.
2012-10-20 06:20:30 PM  
1 votes:

Birnone: Pete_T_Mann: with Kubrick even stating that it's proof that Jack was actually a reincarnation of someone who worked at the hotel five decades earlier.

Reincarnation? Thats really lame. I always thought that the picture meant the hotel had sucked Nicholson into it, so he'd be one of the malevolent ghosts there... FOREVER

That is the point of the story, I don't know where reincarnation fits in. The people who die there, usually under violent conditions, become a part of the hotel. That's why the hotel wants the kid to die there, so it'll absorb his power.

The hotel even mocks the dad at one point, saying that maybe it should have gone through the mom since she's proven to be so much more resourceful. If the dad was always part of it, why would the hotel bring that up?


If the hotel wanted the boy's power by having him die there, then it got that power from Scatman's character, right?

Also, Scatman's character didn't appear in any group photo.
2012-10-20 04:51:15 PM  
1 votes:
To continue my odd theory, I assume some kind of "psychic resonance" to work kind of like a stone thrown in a pond, the ripples go in all directions, so the psychic battery of the hotel considers overlapping spirits from different time periods to belong to it whenever it suits the nefarious purposes of the hotel.
2012-10-20 04:38:05 PM  
1 votes:

limboslam: Manipulating photos before the digital age wasn't that difficult. It wasn't much more time consuming than today either.


media-1.web.britannica.com
2012-10-20 03:42:59 PM  
1 votes:

Now I Is!: I KNOW ANOTHER FACT: The cut-outs were being moved up and down while the image exposed to give them a slight motion blur and something roughly equivalent to a contrast or shadow/hi-light adjustment made psychically scoring the glass plate after it was developed. (talk about a destructive editing process)


Physically manipulating the plate or negative to improve an image was pretty common in the early 20th century, especially in commercial photography. I've got some early 20th century railroad promo pics which have almost been completely repainted in the retouching process. They'd look good enogh in half-tone, but when you see the originals, you notice how heavy-handed the alterations look.
2012-10-20 03:18:26 PM  
1 votes:

thamike: natural316: No TV and no beer make Homer something something

Go crazy?


DON'T MIND IF I DO!!!!!
2012-10-20 02:03:11 PM  
1 votes:

Fano: limboslam: Manipulating photos before the digital age wasn't that difficult. It wasn't much more time consuming than today either. The biggest difference was that back then you had to get out of your seat a couple times.

[24.media.tumblr.com image 520x395]

Pretty much since the invention of photography


There's actually no manipulation in that photo. It's just a picture of a girl at the bottom of her garden with a bunch of cut-out fairies posed in front of her. There's no reason that the picture should have worked out as well as it did, which is why it fooled so many people who should have known better.
2012-10-20 01:45:00 PM  
1 votes:

NeoCortex42: One thing I did like about the TV movie version of the book was the casting of the guy from Wings. He at least seemed like a normal guy who went mad, as opposed to the Kubrick version, where Jack looks completely unhinged from the start.


I've always said there are two versions of the Shining, both equally good. King's is a ghost story, while Kubrick's is a psychological thriller.

Bastard Squad: Not from the article, but in the writer's head: "Kubrick had an incredible memory; he was able to recall phone numbers of friends and family memebers WITHOUT the aid of digital technology like a cell phone or computer. Oh Kubrick, you genius!" etc.


Kubrick started out as a photojournalist when he was a 16 or 17. He ended up working for Look (a Life Magazine imitator) and was really the best thing it had going for it. Even after he became a famous director, he kept up on all the advances in still photography. If he didn't know how to fake a photo himself, he knew who the best person in the business was. And photo retouching, like Photoshop today, was an art with people working at varying skill levels from "looks legit" to "The Commissar Vanishes."

/Given Kubrick's obbssesive attention to detail, I always assumed he staged the shot
//Isn't that Eddie Cantor in the original photo?
2012-10-20 01:43:17 PM  
1 votes:

limboslam: Manipulating photos before the digital age wasn't that difficult. It wasn't much more time consuming than today either. The biggest difference was that back then you had to get out of your seat a couple times.


24.media.tumblr.com

Pretty much since the invention of photography
2012-10-20 12:52:21 PM  
1 votes:

limboslam: Manipulating photos before the digital age wasn't that difficult. It wasn't much more time consuming than today either. The biggest difference was that back then you had to get out of your seat a couple times.


Or as Mrs Spldng & I refer to it: The Joe Stalin School of Photojournalism.

She found herself heavily conflicted several years ago when she was asked to drop a picture of a local candidate into a photo of a group of schoolkids. And this was just for an ad in a weekly advertiser rag.
2012-10-20 12:06:09 PM  
1 votes:
Fark all that, I want some of this wall art:

2.bp.blogspot.com
2012-10-20 11:35:48 AM  
1 votes:
Article is useless without pictures of both versions as described in the text.
I'd bet that the photos weren't airburshed, either. Someone probably used an exacto knife to cut out Jack's picture and it was pasted onto the background photo, then the two were then rephotographed with Panatomic-X and then reprinted as a final photograph. Probably a few were made in different sizes to be filmed and the best shots were used in the final cut of the film.

/Get off my lawn.
2012-10-20 11:21:25 AM  
1 votes:
It's funny that the author of the article is so amazed by airbrushing. Anybody who "read" Playboy in the 1970s could see the magic that airbrushing could do.

/high school class of 1980, why do you ask?
2012-10-20 11:18:24 AM  
1 votes:

Vodka Zombie: Ooba Tooba: My brother has an 8x10 of it framed in his creepy living room. Why yes, he IS single ladies:)

I might need something like that, but I think I might put my own face in place of Nicholson's.

/I'd have to work on my creepy stare though.


With a name like Vodka Zombie it shouldn't be that difficult.
2012-10-20 10:40:19 AM  
1 votes:

Tyrone Slothrop: And if you stop the cross-fade from the wide shot to the close up of Nicholson at just the right place it looks like he has a Hitler mustache, which means that "The Shining" is actually about the Holocaust.

/There is someone who actually believes this


I am willing to be that person.
2012-10-20 10:26:28 AM  
1 votes:
My brother has an 8x10 of it framed in his creepy living room. Why yes, he IS single ladies:)
2012-10-20 10:18:08 AM  
1 votes:
Well, not all of us brush, thamike.
 
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