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(Time)   Can an online degree really help you get a job? The answer won't surprise you   (nation.time.com) divider line 191
    More: Obvious, University of Phoenix, degree programs, online courses, Society for Human Resource Management, for-profit schools, certification program, Human Resource Managements, Apollo Group  
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17074 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Oct 2012 at 1:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-20 12:09:37 AM  
There are very few brick and mortar schools that do not have at least one complete online degree program. I can't think of any university that does not offer at least some portions of their degrees by distance learning except for William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.

Thomas Edison State College in NJ, Charter Oak in Connecticut and Excelsior (formerly Regents) in NY have been the big 3 of distance education for decades. For profit schools such as Phoenix are in a different category than state or non-profit schools. They are indeed regionally accredited (the best kind, national accreditation is the second best - all have to be recognized by DOE) however they lack the cachet that FSU or Stanford or Colorado State, or UNLV or many of the traditional schools that now offer degree programs completely online.

I wouldn't avoid hiring a graduate from a for profit school, but if there were an applicant from a traditional school that earned his degree through distance learning they would probably come to the top of the pile before the for profit school - an unfortunate fact for the for profit student as their education cost is probably much higher.
 
2012-10-20 12:38:51 AM  
And if there were a student that got their degree from University Brick and Mortar vs. University Online? Same university, different context. It still matters, regardless of the Univ., whether the student got their degree from the building or the internet. Until this gets sorted out, it is just a money making scheme.
 
2012-10-20 12:43:58 AM  

Brontes: And if there were a student that got their degree from University Brick and Mortar vs. University Online? Same university, different context. It still matters, regardless of the Univ., whether the student got their degree from the building or the internet. Until this gets sorted out, it is just a money making scheme.


I have an MLS from FSU via distance learning and I have exactly the same diploma as someone who went on campus. I went to the same graduation and wore the same silly robe.

I also have a doctorate (D. Lett et Phil) from UNISA in South Africa that was through primarily research conducted out of South Africa. I did have to meet with my panel and advisor but that is not unusual for that type of degree. Same Diploma as someone who went to the campus every day.

How would you tell someone's MHA from UNLV was on campus or distance learning? It isn't on the diploma or transcripts.
 
2012-10-20 12:49:02 AM  

feckingmorons: Brontes: And if there were a student that got their degree from University Brick and Mortar vs. University Online? Same university, different context. It still matters, regardless of the Univ., whether the student got their degree from the building or the internet. Until this gets sorted out, it is just a money making scheme.

I have an MLS from FSU via distance learning and I have exactly the same diploma as someone who went on campus. I went to the same graduation and wore the same silly robe.

I also have a doctorate (D. Lett et Phil) from UNISA in South Africa that was through primarily research conducted out of South Africa. I did have to meet with my panel and advisor but that is not unusual for that type of degree. Same Diploma as someone who went to the campus every day.

How would you tell someone's MHA from UNLV was on campus or distance learning? It isn't on the diploma or transcripts.


My buddy got his PhD in Biomedical Engineering and had to build an entire polarization interferometer system for primate eyes from scratch, conduct animal experiments for months, compile the data, and prove it statistically, and publish papers on the subject. Which of that could you have done via distance learning?
 
2012-10-20 12:58:08 AM  

Brontes: My buddy got his PhD in Biomedical Engineering and had to build an entire polarization interferometer system for primate eyes from scratch, conduct animal experiments for months, compile the data, and prove it statistically, and publish papers on the subject. Which of that could you have done via distance learning?


Mine is not in the physical sciences. I didn't need to go to a lab to conduct experiments, in fact I couldn't I had to go to Mexico and border states and conduct my research with 0,1 and 2 generation trans border migrants regarding their health information seeking behavior. I did this fieldwork over the course of four years.

You do realize that most doctorates don't require you do fiddle around with test tubes but rather perform original research and - here is the key - write it up in a coherent and defensible end product. I don't know of anyone with a Doctorate who didn't do a lot of, if not most of, their work outside the confines of university walls.
 
2012-10-20 01:09:02 AM  

feckingmorons: Brontes: My buddy got his PhD in Biomedical Engineering and had to build an entire polarization interferometer system for primate eyes from scratch, conduct animal experiments for months, compile the data, and prove it statistically, and publish papers on the subject. Which of that could you have done via distance learning?

Mine is not in the physical sciences. I didn't need to go to a lab to conduct experiments, in fact I couldn't I had to go to Mexico and border states and conduct my research with 0,1 and 2 generation trans border migrants regarding their health information seeking behavior. I did this fieldwork over the course of four years.

You do realize that most doctorates don't require you do fiddle around with test tubes but rather perform original research and - here is the key - write it up in a coherent and defensible end product. I don't know of anyone with a Doctorate who didn't do a lot of, if not most of, their work outside the confines of university walls.


Then why should you get a PhD out of that work. What separates your work from someone with a BS doing field work for a few years. What novelty did you bring to the field. That is crap if you think writing a coherent paper is enough to get a PhD and a PhD will be looked down upon from an e-institution.
 
2012-10-20 01:14:50 AM  
Well my undergrad degree hasn't helped in the slightest. No one cared nor asked except too say, "what does your double major, double minor, and additional track have to do with what you do now?"

Nothing. The answer is nothing but goddammit - do you know how hard that was to do in 4 years? How much money I spent?
 
2012-10-20 01:47:56 AM  
I recently met a woman who works as an engineer for Boeing, who has an online astronautics degree from USC.

/cool anecdote, bro
 
2012-10-20 01:52:21 AM  

Brontes: feckingmorons: Brontes: My buddy got his PhD in Biomedical Engineering and had to build an entire polarization interferometer system for primate eyes from scratch, conduct animal experiments for months, compile the data, and prove it statistically, and publish papers on the subject. Which of that could you have done via distance learning?

Mine is not in the physical sciences. I didn't need to go to a lab to conduct experiments, in fact I couldn't I had to go to Mexico and border states and conduct my research with 0,1 and 2 generation trans border migrants regarding their health information seeking behavior. I did this fieldwork over the course of four years.

You do realize that most doctorates don't require you do fiddle around with test tubes but rather perform original research and - here is the key - write it up in a coherent and defensible end product. I don't know of anyone with a Doctorate who didn't do a lot of, if not most of, their work outside the confines of university walls.

Then why should you get a PhD out of that work. What separates your work from someone with a BS doing field work for a few years. What novelty did you bring to the field. That is crap if you think writing a coherent paper is enough to get a PhD and a PhD will be looked down upon from an e-institution.


Stop being an ivory tower snob. Your particular argument goes into 'turtles all the way down' territory. Both earned the doctorate. Both put the work in. One isn't less of a doctorate because one was achieved online, just as one wouldn't be less of a doctorate because one was earned at Brand X public institution instead of Brand Snob private institution. At least, it shouldn't be. If both expand learning after their doctorates, more power to both of them.
 
2012-10-20 01:53:58 AM  
pfeh. These days you can get a physics Masters from friggin' Stanford or MIT online. PhD really requires you to be there, not much way to dodge it, although you can do some of the coursework distance.

/have been told "I would accept this project as your PhD material, properly documented" more than once, one day I'll take someone up on it
//the issue is...you really HAVE (IMHO) to do your phd work at the school, or on some school related work, not on a military project the school's somewhat affiliated with. Maybe I'm just old fashioned.
///"I'm sorry, doctor...I can't answer that question due to the project being classified. Nor that one. That one either."
 
2012-10-20 01:53:59 AM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: One isn't less of a doctorate because one was achieved online


yes it is
 
2012-10-20 01:55:21 AM  
The day I can't mail order my degrees is the day I drop out of colleges.
 
2012-10-20 01:55:39 AM  

Bontesla: Well my undergrad degree hasn't helped in the slightest. No one cared nor asked except too say, "what does your double major, double minor, and additional track have to do with what you do now?"

Nothing. The answer is nothing but goddammit - do you know how hard that was to do in 4 years? How much money I spent?


It's just a f*cking cappuccino machine. Your degree probably isn't that relevant to the RTFM training program.
 
2012-10-20 01:55:46 AM  

Brontes: And if there were a student that got their degree from University Brick and Mortar vs. University Online? Same university, different context. It still matters, regardless of the Univ., whether the student got their degree from the building or the internet. Until this gets sorted out, it is just a money making scheme.


i think your right. a lot of schools of higher learning have been a money making scheme for a long time. and with the ever rising cost of education and fewer decent paying jobs to be had we are going to slowly cycle back to college once again, for the most part, being for the sons and daughters of the very well to do exclusively.

there are a hell of a lot of vocational and technical schools advertised on TV year after year that will never result in employment for most of their students. damn shame too. the world needs just so many computer technicians and motorcycle repairmen but those schools pack them in while the getting is good. they should be ashamed of themselves.
 
2012-10-20 01:58:47 AM  
i'm getting my Doctorate in Mixology from the Universal Life Church

FARK ALL OF YOU
 
2012-10-20 01:59:23 AM  
I guess if you invent the arc reactor powered flight armor, you could probably get somebody to write off on your doctorate certificate.
 
2012-10-20 02:02:08 AM  
The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

/not all, mind you, but at what seems to be a demonstrably significant number?
 
2012-10-20 02:08:14 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?


I think it's a non-trad vs trad thing. Lots of online degree folk are non-trads. There's a bit of difference, sociologically. I often noticed a bit of friction - the trads didn't like being stomped in class by "old farts", but then I got started about eight years late.
 
2012-10-20 02:13:36 AM  
I find a tremendous difference between my old-fashioned degree and my internet degree.

For one thing, it's easier to wipe your ass with sheepskin than with an iPad.
 
2012-10-20 02:14:18 AM  

erewhon: pfeh. These days you can get a physics Masters from friggin' Stanford or MIT online. PhD really requires you to be there, not much way to dodge it, although you can do some of the coursework distance.

/have been told "I would accept this project as your PhD material, properly documented" more than once, one day I'll take someone up on it
//the issue is...you really HAVE (IMHO) to do your phd work at the school, or on some school related work, not on a military project the school's somewhat affiliated with. Maybe I'm just old fashioned.
///"I'm sorry, doctor...I can't answer that question due to the project being classified. Nor that one. That one either."


It's actually not terribly uncommon for PhD students, at least in the biomedical sciences, to go to another institution to do a large chunk of their research. If not all of it. Those institutions could be other schools, but they could also be hospitals or research labs that are not primarily affiliated with academia. As long as you are doing proper documented scientific research under the supervision of someone with a PhD, your research can be done almost anywhere. Your affiliation goes with you. As far as classified military research is concerned...I can't imagine that grad students work on those projects. It's a publish or perish environment, and if you can't publish it you don't make an impact on the community and your career can suffer.
 
2012-10-20 02:16:16 AM  

Brontes: It still matters, regardless of the Univ., whether the student got their degree from the building or the internet. Until this gets sorted out, it is just a money making scheme.


To a big extent, the thing that matters is the student. If you are self-disciplined and will do the work, online is fine. For a lot of kids, they just can't do it. For a very motivated adult, it's less of an issue. At least until you get to the PhD part, and that one I just don't see how you do online. It's the reason I don't have either an engineering or physics PhD...I can't get the time to devote to it. And as long as a few people here have PhD's, my masters degrees are ok. I haven't seen the need to take years out of my work to do the doctorate route, although Navy would like me to. I haven't convinced myself that I want a doctorate on the physics of acoustics computation (sonar) yet.
 
2012-10-20 02:18:04 AM  

Meatybrain: I find a tremendous difference between my old-fashioned degree and my internet degree.

For one thing, it's easier to wipe your ass with sheepskin than with an iPad.


But it does explain the patented rounded corners
 
2012-10-20 02:19:27 AM  
♪ ♫ I-C-D-C Cah-llege ♬ ♪

/Why not choose a school by the catchiness of its jingle?
//They have "Computerized Accounting," "Homeland Security and Investigation,"
and "Crime Scene Investigator" [farking sic]
///"Please proceed, Governor."
 
2012-10-20 02:20:50 AM  
thumbnails.hulu.com
 
2012-10-20 02:23:08 AM  
I'm curious, if you get a degree from University of Phoenix while living in Phoenix is it just as embarrassing as getting one from there while in Wisconsin or anywhere else?
 
2012-10-20 02:23:28 AM  

erewhon: MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

I think it's a non-trad vs trad thing. Lots of online degree folk are non-trads. There's a bit of difference, sociologically. I often noticed a bit of friction - the trads didn't like being stomped in class by "old farts", but then I got started about eight years late.


I sniff a bit of defensiveness, too. But that could be just my uneducated take on it
 
2012-10-20 02:23:57 AM  
Would an on-line degree have helped.....Titler?
i229.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-20 02:24:37 AM  
My guess is that it's less about if it matters if it's online or in the classroom, but more about the school's credibility. Any degree from an obvious diploma mill college is pretty much worth nothing, especially if the major the school is known for is dental assistant and it's ads play during reruns of 'Saved by the Bell' and 'The Beverly Hillbillies'.
 
2012-10-20 02:25:25 AM  
The only thing that really counts are the words, Associates, Bachelors and Masters

at least an Associates...to get your foot in the door...the rest is experience.
for leadership, typically they want a Bachelors
Masters is only a marketing pitch.
PhD unless you're in science, education or medicine is way overkill

They don't look at your GPA
They don't see your school's name unless it's like Yale, Harvard, MIT and such.

They figure out what they want in the interviews after that.
Technical, philosophical, etc...

So the only real reason its still around is to justify your wage level if anything.
 
2012-10-20 02:25:34 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

/not all, mind you, but at what seems to be a demonstrably significant number?



There's a TV commercial for an online school which has a guy saying something like, "I want classes I control..."

Anyone who actually thinks that way about school is typically going to be a jerk.

People who don't physically attend classes are missing out on some intangible benefits of brick-and-mortar schools: Socialization and development of social skills. If you're sitting at home in your pajamas throughout your entire education, that lack of in-person human contact in a formal learning environment is going to hurt you when you have to actually have to go out and interact with the working world... Unless you can land a 100% telecommuting job, I guess... after having gone through an online interview process... after having applied for the job through an online service.
 
2012-10-20 02:27:39 AM  

erewhon: MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

I think it's a non-trad vs trad thing. Lots of online degree folk are non-trads. There's a bit of difference, sociologically. I often noticed a bit of friction - the trads didn't like being stomped in class by "old farts", but then I got started about eight years late.


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ pretty much

sucks to be folks who had to get a job, raise a family and/or serve for a couple years instead of being a professional student from high school to end of post-secondary, right?
 
2012-10-20 02:27:52 AM  

Nickninja: As far as classified military research is concerned...I can't imagine that grad students work on those projects. It's a publish or perish environment, and if you can't publish it you don't make an impact on the community and your career can suffer.


It's a problem. You can do most of the design work as long as you have some documentable doctorates onboard. Some projects you only need a masters on. However, when you are a grad student associated with it, it is tough. It's why I haven't made the leap - I can't afford the time it takes to work in academia or civilian projects for the doctorate. I could do it in something that's dual-use, and I've debated it, but it's still tough. In physics or EE it tends not to be something you can do locally. My Masters alma mater (Ga Tech) tends to do a lot of gubmint stuff, although not all of it would be publishable, some of it has been. Still, it's one of those things that I'd love to do but haven't convinced myself to jump off the deep end. I like making money. A few years teaching undergrads and repairing equipment isn't attractive enough, so far.

I have, however, hit some really frustrating points where they want ME to have a PhD, personally, even though the bid was all my work, and they acknowledge it's original, correct, and interesting enough to steal and give to SAIC or LockMar. "Wow, if you only had a doctorate in that...no one else came up with it and it's stood up to some rigorous investigation". Yeah, thanks.

/'A novel approach for digitally synthesized large field HF steered-beam array exciters"...almost
 
2012-10-20 02:29:09 AM  
 
2012-10-20 02:30:48 AM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: erewhon: MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

I think it's a non-trad vs trad thing. Lots of online degree folk are non-trads. There's a bit of difference, sociologically. I often noticed a bit of friction - the trads didn't like being stomped in class by "old farts", but then I got started about eight years late.

I sniff a bit of defensiveness, too. But that could be just my uneducated take on it


Not so much. I hit the college scene at 28. I didn't have a lot in common. But then, my party hearty days were over, and I had a lot of fun crushing the kids beneath my booted sandals, seeing them driven before me, and hearing the lamentations of their women.
 
2012-10-20 02:34:17 AM  

Fark Me To Tears: MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

/not all, mind you, but at what seems to be a demonstrably significant number?


There's a TV commercial for an online school which has a guy saying something like, "I want classes I control..."

Anyone who actually thinks that way about school is typically going to be a jerk.

People who don't physically attend classes are missing out on some intangible benefits of brick-and-mortar schools: Socialization and development of social skills. If you're sitting at home in your pajamas throughout your entire education, that lack of in-person human contact in a formal learning environment is going to hurt you when you have to actually have to go out and interact with the working world... Unless you can land a 100% telecommuting job, I guess... after having gone through an online interview process... after having applied for the job through an online service.


You don't need college for that. You learn that on the job, if you haven't already learned it under mom and pop's roof. The well-rounded person already has those skills. All brick and mortar does is bust folks out from beneath their parent's wings in a more controlled setting than just moving into their own apartment one day.

As for classes the guy in the a controls, that's a siren song for the non-traditionals erewhon speaks of, above. If you have to work, online courses allow you take courses you otherwise couldn't because you're an adult with responsibilities who has to work during the day, raise children the rest of the time, and/or transportation is an issue.

Online courses are like telecommuting.
Some bosses insist that jobs must be done in brick and mortar settings.
Well, why?
Why should someone come in to program, when they can program from home?
Why should someone come in to answer calls, when they can answer calls at home?
If the same work can be done on one's own time, as long as it's done, who gives a fk?

Is telecommuting given the same snob treatment as online courses?
 
2012-10-20 02:39:05 AM  
I personally cant wait until online learning is more widely accepted, its only a matter of time. I'll probably "go back" and get my degree.

I couldnt stand sitting in a classroom not being stimulated... ended up dropping out twice, taught myself everything I needed via the internet, and started my own business *shrug*
 
2012-10-20 02:39:24 AM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: sucks to be folks who had to get a job, raise a family and/or serve for a couple years instead of being a professional student from high school to end of post-secondary, right?


I actually considered it to be personally expanding. It's not everyone who gets to see the world, meet interesting people, subvert their government, and teach them annoying things to do with high explosives.

It did get me past a lot of college prereqs, especially the engineering ones.
 
2012-10-20 02:40:26 AM  

rogue49: PhD unless you're in science, education or medicine is way overkill


For a lot of liberal arts types, PhDs are what you need to actually get any kind of job in the field.
 
2012-10-20 02:42:22 AM  
erewhon:
I have, however, hit some really frustrating points where they want ME to have a PhD, personally, even though the bid was all my work, and they acknowledge it's original, correct, and interesting enough to steal and give to SAIC or LockMar. "Wow, if you only had a doctorate in that...no one else came up with it and it's stood up to some rigorous investigation".

I'm having the opposite problem trying to find a job after I graduate. Everyone wants me to be a BS or MS with industry experience rather than a freshly minted PhD.
 
2012-10-20 02:46:06 AM  
As you get older the question changes from "What school did you attend?" to "Can you do the work, and do it well.?"
 
2012-10-20 02:47:00 AM  

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: I'm curious, if you get a degree from University of Phoenix while living in Phoenix is it just as embarrassing as getting one from there while in Wisconsin or anywhere else?


MOST schools, and I'm talking MIT, Stanford, Brown, Ga Tech and the like, will take you all the way through your Masters degree. You can do SOME of the PhD work online. It's not just UoP anymore. *However*, it's not for everyone. If you have little self-discipline, you won't make it with upper level science degrees online with a real school.
 
2012-10-20 02:53:33 AM  

rogue49: The only thing that really counts are the words, Associates, Bachelors and Masters

at least an Associates...to get your foot in the door...the rest is experience.
for leadership, typically they want a Bachelors
Masters is only a marketing pitch.
PhD unless you're in science, education or medicine is way overkill

They don't look at your GPA
They don't see your school's name unless it's like Yale, Harvard, MIT and such.

They figure out what they want in the interviews after that.
Technical, philosophical, etc...

So the only real reason its still around is to justify your wage level if anything.


I wouldn't limit my consideration of leaders at just Bachelors and higher. Mainly because colleges don't teach leadership. I could get a better leader out of a 18 year old kid with three years of Junior ROTC experience than I can out of a college graduate. And honestly, I think that a huge problem with the corporate culture is that they base certain levels off of what degree level you have. My last corporate job I dealt with many District Managers and Regional Managers and Regional Vice Presidents and there were a handful that were decent. The majority weren't fit to lead a game of Duck Duck Goose,but ended up in leadership roles of a company that five years ago was a Fortune 500 company and now isn't even that. The worse ones were the ones who figured that since they were at the level that they were at that anyone below them had to kiss their ass and be honored if the only reply was "Fark off".

I am currently interviewing with a company that is based from New York, is a Fortune 100 company with over $110billion in assets and been around for the past 150 years and is viewed as the industry leader in the financial services industry, plus when the Federal Government was offering the TARP bailout money, this company refused to accept any of it because it avoided the subprime lending crisis. I was told that based upon performance in two years upon hiring, if I get the job, I can be offered management. But that's not a sudden promotion but rather, more training in addition to the three years of training that will start upon my hiring. I don't have a Bachelors Degree and everything that I am going to need to know, they will train me at their expense. Upon finishing the interview I went to my car and told my wife everything and asked "Why the fark did I go to college to get that associate's degree when I could have just gone straight into the financial services industry?"

Now, I'm not saying that people shouldn't seek higher educations nor am I saying that everyone should flock to the financial services industry. But I do think that college is over rated, over priced, and corporations and HR departments have their head firmly planted up their asses for wanting people with bachelor degrees for what are really entry level jobs with almost zero potential for advancement. The guy at McDonalds who works the drive thru closest to your home has a better chance at becoming a District Manager with McDonalds than I had at my old company of getting any higher than the absolute bottom of the company. Part of their reasoning was that I didn't have a Bachelor's degree. And when you look at the jobs that were above mine they all said 'Requires Bachelor Degree' and it was still basic and simple data entry. In many ways I think we've devalued the Bachelor's degree to the level of it being worthless. Unless it's medicine, engineering, science or law, what you learn in school will have very little to do with what you do career wise. And for the most part, you end up being trained by your company on how to do the job. The bachelors degree is just an early way of filtering out prospects.
 
2012-10-20 02:56:41 AM  

Nickninja: Everyone wants me to be a BS or MS with industry experience rather than a freshly minted PhD.


That's a reason I have trouble justifying the time and expense. Part of me really wants to get that doctorate. But the part that wants to pay off the kids' college, the house, 60 acres of land, and the family farm in Toccoa says "nah, screw it".

I have had some frustrating times with the Navy, in that they've pulled that PhD thing twice. I can't tell you on what. However, I suspect it's more a give-my-buddies-the-bid than you're-not-a-postdoc.

It is sort of a pisser to have them say "What a good idea, too bad you don't have a PhD, we're rebidding the entire project with your bid as the new baseline project definition since we never thought of those aspects of the situation"
 
2012-10-20 02:58:02 AM  
I think I just managed the Star-kist Tuna of trolls

/I caught everything but what I was fishing for
 
2012-10-20 02:58:38 AM  

Nickninja: Everyone wants me to be a BS or MS with industry experience rather than a freshly minted PhD.


Depending on what you've got a newly minted PhD in, the gubmint might LOVE to have you. How are you with being shot at?
 
2012-10-20 03:31:01 AM  
UT Austin now has the option of nuke engineering grad degrees through distance learning. I plan to do my PhD this way. I doubt it will effect my hireability.
 
2012-10-20 03:44:15 AM  

erewhon: MaudlinMutantMollusk: The real question is why do so many people with online degrees seem to be such jerks?

I think it's a non-trad vs trad thing. Lots of online degree folk are non-trads. There's a bit of difference, sociologically. I often noticed a bit of friction - the trads didn't like being stomped in class by "old farts", but then I got started about eight years late.


This. I am a non-trad (not online) and it is pretty common for me to leave class thinking "was I this ignorant in my early 20s?".

Of course I was.
 
2012-10-20 03:51:21 AM  

Brontes: My buddy got his PhD in Biomedical Engineering and had to build an entire polarization interferometer system for primate eyes from scratch, conduct animal experiments for months, compile the data, and prove it statistically, and publish papers on the subject. Which of that could you have done via distance learning?


Every single bit, as long as he had access to a suitable workshop.
 
2012-10-20 03:53:04 AM  

Brontes: Then why should you get a PhD out of that work. What separates your work from someone with a BS doing field work for a few years. What novelty did you bring to the field. That is crap if you think writing a coherent paper is enough to get a PhD and a PhD will be looked down upon from an e-institution.


As long as you do original work, why should it matter where you do it? Field work is part of many doctorates anyway - a cousin of mine spent three years in Hungarian archive to get a UK doctorate in history.
 
2012-10-20 04:12:07 AM  
All universities in the US should be viewed as 'for profit.' They are run like businesses.
 
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