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(Some Guy)   Twitter censors neo-Nazis in Germany. You know who else used to censor people in Germany?   (techweekeurope.co.uk) divider line 16
    More: Asinine, Hannover, racial harassment, censorships, criminal organizations, objectives  
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2406 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Oct 2012 at 5:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-19 05:28:48 PM
4 votes:
You're not free to be a Nazi in Germany. That's just the way it is. You're not allowed to display Nazi symbols or name your kids Hitler or Adolf, and you're not gonna get a lot of support for changing that, even if you are repressing what we in the USA would consider to be free speech.

Maybe in another 50 years it will relax but it hasn't been long enough yet to let the Nazi party be just a part of history.
2012-10-19 03:10:56 PM
2 votes:
Kinda sorta: The allies after World War I?
2012-10-19 10:22:15 PM
1 votes:

Vectron: So I guess you won't see this on a billboard.

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 282x400]


Should be HUGO BOSS
2012-10-19 10:05:27 PM
1 votes:
They are (a little understandably) sensitive about it. They don't even like to show their flag.
2012-10-19 07:17:28 PM
1 votes:

Earthen: You're not free to be a Nazi in Germany. That's just the way it is. You're not allowed to display Nazi symbols or name your kids Hitler or Adolf, and you're not gonna get a lot of support for changing that, even if you are repressing what we in the USA would consider to be free speech.

Maybe in another 50 years it will relax but it hasn't been long enough yet to let the Nazi party be just a part of history.


Specifically, the line in the Basic Law (their constitution the US,France, and UK wrote) specifically says your rights are no longer protected when they are used to "attack the democratic order" . National Socialism, as one can imagine, thus is no longer a legal political ideology in German politics.

Germany has persecuted (in the loosest sense of the word) Nazis with significantly less vigor in recently years.
2012-10-19 07:17:25 PM
1 votes:
Oh you silly americans and your "freedom of speech". Lots of countries have anti-hate-speed laws on the books and they're doing just fine.
2012-10-19 07:11:58 PM
1 votes:
What, are we actually defending Nazis here? Bunch of crazies.

/loving the German babes, though, keep 'em coming
//you all can have the beer, I hate alcohol
2012-10-19 07:08:15 PM
1 votes:
tomcatadam
So could you make/form a legitimate national socialist party in Germany?


No.


Can they use Swastikas in articles about Indian religions?


Yes.

Though you aren't protected from idiots going to court anyway and idiot judges.
IIRC the case about using a swastika on some anti-nazi stuff (like a stick figure throwing a swastika into a garbage can or crossing it out and adding something like "no nazis" below it) actually needed an appeal to be declared legal (again).
Then again, that's very different than an article about Indian religions because the usage in the anti-Nazi stuff was clearly politically motivated and clearly referring to the nazis.



I mean, if the law is nicely applied and not used as a heavy hammer to smash down people with other beliefs that happen to slightly overlap something that might even transiently be related to Nazism, then that's fine.


The law is one that allows the banning of organizations (and the usage of their symbols and other propaganda) which have been declared anti-constitutional/anti-democratic.

There are also several exceptions for e.g. educational and artistic usage in that law, i.e. the law takes context into account.
Which would make the above example of an article about Indian religions a complete non-issue (then again, some idiot might go to court anyway, but I'm pretty sure of the verdict).
It's not like German history books aren't full of that stuff or like they aren't used in German movies(*):
just think of all those "Hitler reacts to.." Downfall parodies on youtube. you might have noticed that this subtitle thing mostly works because most people won't understand the original audio, which, like the movie, is German.

Which is why people claiming that this law is a German attempt at hiding the past and quotes about the dangers of repeating the history you don't remember are borderline retarded statements in this context; well, either retarded or the results of failed education paired with willful ignorance. 

----
(*)
However, there seems to be a curious double-standard regarding (computer) games.
I would really like to see some game developer have the balls to go to court over why it's apparently okay to have action movies with swastikas and nazis in uniform (i.e. context is clearly entertainment instead of education), but not games.
I guess pixelating is cheaper than lawyers and risking the potential PR nightmare.
2012-10-19 07:00:43 PM
1 votes:

Ashrams: Two things that go great together.

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x302]


We need bacon slipped in there, and we'd have the tripe B's.
2012-10-19 06:55:45 PM
1 votes:

skinink: Lionel Mandrake: Germany is enforcing a policy in effect since the end of the war?

/didn't see that coming.
//not saying I agree with the policy...

I don't think Germany has many other restrictions regarding speech, so I'd think it's no big deal to give them leeway on the Hitler issue, probably the main issue they are sensitive about.


Anyone who was lucky to survive the Nazi dictatorship is more than likely ok with this.

There's a reason Niemoller never said "They came for the Nazis, but I wasn't a Nazi..."
2012-10-19 06:50:23 PM
1 votes:
Are other hate groups outlawed in Germany? Does Twitter censor the content of those persecuting other holocaust victims, like gays, gypsies, etc.?
2012-10-19 06:10:55 PM
1 votes:
Is not asinine... Twitter wants to operate in Germany, so they have to follow the laws in Germany. Also, the German law isn't that you can't talk about the Nazis, that's just silly, anyone who has been there knows that they, more than anyone, talk about the holocaust. The law prohibits speaking about it in a promoting manner, e.g. indicating that Nazis were doing the right thing, that the holocaust was good, or that those policies should be reinstated.
2012-10-19 06:00:20 PM
1 votes:
Meh, they pretty much shut down any extremist group there. When I was stationed there the KLA were on their radar all the time, and this was long before twitter
2012-10-19 05:47:26 PM
1 votes:
There's nothing "Neo" about them.
They're Nazis.
2012-10-19 05:35:29 PM
1 votes:

Lionel Mandrake: Germany is enforcing a policy in effect since the end of the war?

/didn't see that coming.
//not saying I agree with the policy...


I don't think Germany has many other restrictions regarding speech, so I'd think it's no big deal to give them leeway on the Hitler issue, probably the main issue they are sensitive about.
2012-10-19 05:33:53 PM
1 votes:
What's asinine about this? Being a nazi and espousing nazi ideas are both illegal in Germany. I'm sure you can guess why.
 
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