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(Telegraph)   Wounded British WWII hero dies at 94 and is cremated, leaving behind six ounces of shrapnel among the ashes in addition to the customary giant clanking balls   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 43
    More: Hero, heavy bag  
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8657 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Oct 2012 at 11:30 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-19 09:49:49 AM  

I'm sure they found something, but sheetmetal screws and wood screws, bailing wire and what looks like a assortment of cotter pins? Maybe he was one of those people who swallows stuff...
More than likely the Crematorium just handed over a bag of bits collected over time..


i.telegraph.co.uk
 
2012-10-19 09:58:23 AM  

The Iron duke: I'm sure they found something, but sheetmetal screws and wood screws, bailing wire and what looks like a assortment of cotter pins?


I'm not an expert on Nazi mine construction circa 1944, but hasn't it always been pretty common practice to add all kinds of random metallic crapola to bombs and mines to maximize the injury potential?
 
2012-10-19 10:26:25 AM  

Gulper Eel: The Iron duke: I'm sure they found something, but sheetmetal screws and wood screws, bailing wire and what looks like a assortment of cotter pins?

I'm not an expert on Nazi mine construction circa 1944, but hasn't it always been pretty common practice to add all kinds of random metallic crapola to bombs and mines to maximize the injury potential?


The Germans have always been a generally orderly race, there were a few wood mines, but that mess just looks like stuff swept off the floor. Theres a few pieces of shrapnel and or bullet frags in the provided picture..But over all i'm calling 'shenanigans'...
 
2012-10-19 11:35:30 AM  
Yeah, I think that's a stock photo. There's a bit that looks like part of a bull-dog clip.
 
2012-10-19 11:35:38 AM  
fta He survived the war but only ever told his family the basic story and said the accident had left him with a 'bad knee'.

It's only a flesh wound!

Good run, inspirational roll model guy. Well done. How about you rest now.
 
2012-10-19 11:36:14 AM  
the land mines may have been precision instruments but it was often typical to put a whole bunch of crap like that over the mine to disguise it and to cause more damage.
 
2012-10-19 11:36:37 AM  
Maybe it's just a stock photo for "metal scraps"? You see stuff like this when insurgents are making mines out of household junk, but it doesn't look like a real military mine.
 
2012-10-19 11:36:40 AM  
At the crematorium:

`Did you cremate that war hero?'

`Yes.'

`And did you take that demolished tool shed to the dump?'

`Um - er - Yes! I -er- did.'
 
2012-10-19 11:37:13 AM  
Somehow I do not think the accompanying picture is of the actual shrapnel pulled from his ashes.
 
2012-10-19 11:41:59 AM  

The Iron duke: .But over all i'm calling 'shenanigans'...


Me too. The Phillips head screw was first used in 1937ish. That and most of the stuff looks like it is made of iron - something the body would have disposed of long ago. (I think)
 
2012-10-19 11:44:52 AM  
What's so bad about a bunch of rubber bands?
 
2012-10-19 11:48:36 AM  
But because of medical conditions of the day it was thought safer to leave shrapnel in his body.

Still to this day it is. The body encapsulates it. One thing they learned in the US Civil War was digging out bullets or whatever did more damage than the initial wound did.

/Not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV.
 
2012-10-19 11:49:47 AM  

The Iron duke: I'm sure they found something, but sheetmetal screws and wood screws, bailing wire and what looks like a assortment of cotter pins? Maybe he was one of those people who swallows stuff...
More than likely the Crematorium just handed over a bag of bits collected over time..


[i.telegraph.co.uk image 620x387]


Bomb shrapnel is irregular bits of iron. Most of that is screws from the coffin and bits of wire put in him by the embalmer.
 
2012-10-19 11:56:45 AM  

big_hed: But because of medical conditions of the day it was thought safer to leave shrapnel in his body.

Still to this day it is. The body encapsulates it. One thing they learned in the US Civil War was digging out bullets or whatever did more damage than the initial wound did.

/Not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV.


My roommate still has a bunch of grenade shrapnel in him. Every once in awhile a piece will work itself out. Kind of strange to think about it.
 
2012-10-19 11:57:02 AM  
Godspeed sir
 
2012-10-19 11:57:36 AM  
I see the tontine is down to the last two then...

imageshack.us
 
2012-10-19 12:01:28 PM  

Tellingthem: big_hed: But because of medical conditions of the day it was thought safer to leave shrapnel in his body.

Still to this day it is. The body encapsulates it. One thing they learned in the US Civil War was digging out bullets or whatever did more damage than the initial wound did.

/Not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV.

My roommate still has a bunch of grenade shrapnel in him. Every once in awhile a piece will work itself out. Kind of strange to think about it.


My grandfather stepped on a mine in Italy during the war. Lost one leg, shattered the other, and lost half of his hand. Till the day he died in his 70s, he had bits of metal that worked their way out regularly. He also had ghost pains in his missing leg on occasion that only morphine would assuage. I wish I'd been more interested to hear his stories when he wanted to tell them, but I was an indifferent teen at the time.
 
2012-10-19 12:04:19 PM  

dofus: The Iron duke: .But over all i'm calling 'shenanigans'...

Me too. The Phillips head screw was first used in 1937ish. That and most of the stuff looks like it is made of iron - something the body would have disposed of long ago. (I think)


Note: WWII went from 1939-1945. So the Phillips is contemporary. And the body does not necessarily get rid of all fragments.
 
2012-10-19 12:04:33 PM  

wildcardjack: Yeah, I think that's a stock photo. There's a bit that looks like part of a bull-dog clip.


Yeah. Obligatory photo of what six ounces of metal might look like.
 
2012-10-19 12:05:47 PM  
If a bomb blew his leg apart it's possible some of the metal was necessary to put his leg back together. The details of his injury would be in his military record, Not sure if the UK allows family to access those.
 
2012-10-19 12:07:27 PM  
Apparently that isn't a stock photo. I went to the copyright source of the picture for the article and saw this image.

swns.com
Link

Here is the image that shows up at TNTMagazine for the same artice.
www.tntmagazine.com
Link

Also the Daily Fail ran this story but didn't say six ounces of shrapnel. They said almost 1lb of shrapnel... 
i.dailymail.co.uk
Link
 
2012-10-19 12:10:21 PM  
as a kid, a fell off a go-cart onto asphalt and got a substantial amount of road rash over my back, shoulders and arm.

about 15 years later, my wife was picking at something she thought was a pimple in my back, it ended by being parts of asphalt and rocks... just waiting for her.

/ still have had rocks and asphalt come out from that incident.
// csb over... not sure if relevant... other than to say, foreign stuff can stay in the body for a while.
 
2012-10-19 12:10:37 PM  

The Iron duke: I'm sure they found something, but sheetmetal screws and wood screws, bailing wire and what looks like a assortment of cotter pins? Maybe he was one of those people who swallows stuff...
More than likely the Crematorium just handed over a bag of bits collected over time..


[i.telegraph.co.uk image 620x387]


That was almost exactly what I thought... it does look like stuff someone might swallow. But I am far from an expert on shiat that goes into WWII mines so I'll refrain from throwing a bullshiat flag.

It's an extremely odd collection of junk.
 
2012-10-19 12:14:15 PM  

freetomato: Tellingthem: big_hed: But because of medical conditions of the day it was thought safer to leave shrapnel in his body.

Still to this day it is. The body encapsulates it. One thing they learned in the US Civil War was digging out bullets or whatever did more damage than the initial wound did.

/Not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV.

My roommate still has a bunch of grenade shrapnel in him. Every once in awhile a piece will work itself out. Kind of strange to think about it.

My grandfather stepped on a mine in Italy during the war. Lost one leg, shattered the other, and lost half of his hand. Till the day he died in his 70s, he had bits of metal that worked their way out regularly. He also had ghost pains in his missing leg on occasion that only morphine would assuage. I wish I'd been more interested to hear his stories when he wanted to tell them, but I was an indifferent teen at the time.


I tried to get my grandpa to talk about his but he wouldn't talk about actual combat. The thing he talked most about was how hot it was. Same with my Dad (Vietnam) and roommate (Gulf War).
 
2012-10-19 12:35:54 PM  

dofus: That and most of the stuff looks like it is made of iron - something the body would have disposed of long ago. (I think)


I have a sewing needle that's been in my foot for about 35 years, shows up nice and clear on xrays (I just found out it was there last year).
 
2012-10-19 12:41:56 PM  
In an attempt to out do the Daily Mail, the Sun is reporting 6 tons of shrapnel and posted this picture.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-19 12:43:50 PM  
came looking for Tony Stark reference; leaving disappointed ...

The screws could have come from his coffin - or possibly to help put his leg back together.
 
2012-10-19 01:18:15 PM  
Who cares whether the picture is legit or not? Did everyone ignore the [Hero] tag?
 
2012-10-19 01:24:38 PM  

Loadmaster: Who cares whether the picture is legit or not? Did everyone ignore the [Hero] tag?


The term "hero" is so watered down these days.

/vet
 
2012-10-19 01:54:35 PM  

LaRoach: dofus: That and most of the stuff looks like it is made of iron - something the body would have disposed of long ago. (I think)

I have a sewing needle that's been in my foot for about 35 years, shows up nice and clear on xrays (I just found out it was there last year).


I would think a sewing needle would be made of stainless. Iron and steel susceptible to rust would probably disappear pretty quickly. (Still guessing)
 
2012-10-19 02:25:07 PM  

dofus: LaRoach: dofus: That and most of the stuff looks like it is made of iron - something the body would have disposed of long ago. (I think)

I have a sewing needle that's been in my foot for about 35 years, shows up nice and clear on xrays (I just found out it was there last year).

I would think a sewing needle would be made of stainless. Iron and steel susceptible to rust would probably disappear pretty quickly. (Still guessing)


Yah, I'm not sure what they're made of. I should go stick a magnet to one and see if it's stainless or not.

It's kind of fun to watch the Xray techs look at you... look at the pic... look at you... They want to ask what that is but they're not sure they should!
 
2012-10-19 02:40:28 PM  
Regardless of what the metal looks like, that man was a pure badass to cary it around for 60 years. Look how many Farkers piss and whine if they get a sliver.
 
2012-10-19 02:49:05 PM  
Clanking Balls indeed. Those things that look like wire were his spermatozoa.
 
2012-10-19 02:51:59 PM  
I too had a sewing needle in my foot (60's, from making a pipe screen) I had it removed at the time, was told "steel travels"
They musta had a hard time finding it, I had about a 6" scar
 
2012-10-19 02:54:44 PM  
I guess my injury was from the war too....the war on drugs
 
2012-10-19 04:07:38 PM  
The one thing that shocked me from that article:

"But he also spoke of how of the 900 original members of his regiment, only 29 came home from the front."

holy christ.
 
2012-10-19 04:32:43 PM  
 
2012-10-19 06:12:22 PM  
What is it about the British press that they repeat the same info over and over throughout an article? Is there an ADD epidemic over there?
 
2012-10-19 06:16:29 PM  
So, why are British sites reporting this as "six ounces"? Didn't they lose the war and have the metric system imposed on them by the Germans?
 
2012-10-19 08:37:07 PM  
FYI -- not all stainless steel is non- (anti-) magnetic. Certain alloys are, but most are not -- if you have a real Swiss Army knife, check the blade.

It takes lots of heat to fully cremate a body, and smaller metal objects are likely to partially melt or deform -- I think the funeral home pulled a fast one.

As for the photo with the hand full of shrapnel, it looks like the spoon off a U.S.-made grenade and various calibers of ammunition that look like they were live and went off when burned.
 
2012-10-19 09:33:20 PM  
"Wounded British WWII hero dies at 94"

You'd think they would've healed his wound.
 
2012-10-19 10:53:00 PM  

big_hed: But because of medical conditions of the day it was thought safer to leave shrapnel in his body.


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-10-20 03:10:56 PM  

Basily Gourt: The one thing that shocked me from that article:

"But he also spoke of how of the 900 original members of his regiment, only 29 came home from the front."

holy christ.


that's the part that got me, too
 
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