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(Guardian)   Sensationalism grab: "60% of young people in custody in the UK have experienced traumatic brain injury" but then it gets into some nerdy mumbo jumbo and I'm like cheah, whatEVER Oh My God shut up already   (guardian.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Scary, sensationalisms, youths  
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2225 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Oct 2012 at 8:39 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-19 08:40:02 AM  
www.bbc.co.uk
/hot
//the image that is
 
2012-10-19 08:42:25 AM  
Maybe the police should stop beating them up.
 
2012-10-19 08:52:32 AM  
forums.prosoundweb.com
 
2012-10-19 08:54:58 AM  
FTFA: Apparently, 60% of young people in custody say they have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

Emphasis mine. C'mon, lots of kids who've been arrested will claim to have been damaged, just to irk their arresting officers!
 
2012-10-19 09:07:12 AM  
do they look bovvered to you?!
 
2012-10-19 09:11:44 AM  

stevarooni: FTFA: Apparently, 60% of young people in custody say they have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

Emphasis mine. C'mon, lots of kids who've been arrested will claim to have been damaged, just to irk their arresting officers!


And people who are criminals because of brain trauma are the ones we need to lock away most. It is not as if we can regrow brains to make them into "normal" people.
 
2012-10-19 09:15:55 AM  
Apparently, 60% of young people in custody say they have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

And apparently 95% of young people in custody say they are innocent.

We probably should believe them, and let them go free.
 
2012-10-19 09:30:37 AM  
If we really wanted to be neurologically correct about things then the age of majority would be 25, when the decision-making centers of the brain finally reach full maturity in most people. But there are plenty of other reasons not to push the age of majority back that far.

Perhaps society really would benefit, as this article suggests, from recognizing a third stage of life between 'child' and 'adult': not a mere liminal state, the way we currently treat adolescence, but something distinct. Of course, this leads to questions of implementation: when would it begin and end, what rights and restrictions would someone in this state face, and so on, and I don't think it's going to be easy to get anyone to agree on what that might entail.
 
2012-10-19 09:37:28 AM  
While well written and substantiated by actual facts, I think this type of thinking is a non-starter, at least in the US.
We are (apparently) far more focused in retribution and punishment than prevention and understanding. We have a history of punishment, harsh punishment. We understand punishment. We fear change.
When you add in the multiculturalism (brown or different people, "otherness") it becomes too difficult for the average run of the mill politician to legislate and, seeing as how we have all those privately run prisons and the corporations that depend on the income from filling those prisons well, this wonderfully written, humane and insightful report ends up being shoved on the shelf and classified as just one more case of mental masturbation.


Next?
 
2012-10-19 09:47:10 AM  

DerAppie: stevarooni: FTFA: Apparently, 60% of young people in custody say they have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

Emphasis mine. C'mon, lots of kids who've been arrested will claim to have been damaged, just to irk their arresting officers!

And people who are criminals because of brain trauma are the ones we need to lock away most. It is not as if we can regrow brains to make them into "normal" people.


While true that they can't regrow their damaged brain cells, there are - and have been for decades now - effective therapies to help people with TBI to guard against impulsive, unsafe, or destructive behavior that one typically sees after sustaining TBI. There is no reason to sequester individuals with TBI, but there is a desperate need for us to get them the therapy they need. The problem is the majority of TBIs do not have any obvious physical deficits, so they look "normal". Because they look normal, most people do not think that any strange or dangerous behavior could have a physiological cause and attribute it instead to personality or attitude, or some other external factor (and this is common with many other medical issues, there's a wonderful website called "But You Don't Look Sick" that provides stories from many people who have diseases or disorders that do not manifest physically). The end result is that most people, especially children, with TBI do not get the medical and psychological treatment they need.

A few years ago I published a study investigating the rates of TBI in children versus the number of children in schools who receive special services in schools for their TBI. The difference in prevalence versus services provided is disturbing. In some states, it's upwards of 10% of children under the age of 15 who have sustained at least one TBI that causes developmental delays and cognitive impairment. By contrast, the states in the US that provide the most widely accessible services only manage to help less than 0.5% of their students who need them. And that's best case. At my university, for example, a campus with over 40,000 students, my own research has indicated approximately 2% of the student body had sustained a severe enough TBI that resulted in long-lasting problems for academic success, adjustment to new environments, and socialization. Yet at the time I did my research only 12 students were receiving assistance from Student Disability Services for TBI related issues.

Part of this is due to a complete lack of advocacy. The medical community does a poor job informing the schools, leaving it up to the parents or the student himself/herself to do so, which is strange considering most parents do not understand the nature of neurological dysfunction. It can take months or years for some symptoms to fully show themselves (especially if the injury was pre-adolescence), and by that time most people do not make the connection between the injury and this newly developed attention problem, memory problem, or impulse control issue. Part of my research is to develop a screening instrument for schools to use. As a pleasant example of converging ideas, the athletics departments at many high schools and colleges are seeking to do the same thing so they can really monitor the consequences of concussions (a mild TBI) sustained during contact sports.

Part of it is, a large part of it, is due to a lack of resources appropriated to address the issue. We've seen that with how the US armed forces have bungled their handling of the well over tens of thousands of veterans over the past decade who have come back from their tour(s) of duty with TBI. They were simply overwhelmed by the number of cases, panicked, and either (a) reclassified their injuries as post-traumatic stress disorder or (b) denied they existed. They could not handle the scale of the problem, so they tried to reinterpret the problem to one that they could handle. It was - and in some areas of the country continues to be - one of the most shameful things I think our government has ever done to its military.

Also, regarding the emphasis of saying one has a brain injury - it wasn't as if the researchers in TFA just asked "Hey are you brain damaged?" Although, even if they had, how many people would seriously answer yes? But that aside, most of this type of prevalence research that is done without access to medical records, it is done by asking about other types of events. I.e. have you ever been knocked out in a fight, have you ever sought medical treatment for a car accident, etc. etc. After summing over a series of questions like that, a clever researcher can in fact get a pretty good estimate.

/apologies for the rant
//this is a field i'm deeply involved in, and i feel strongly about
///no offense to anyone was intended
 
2012-10-19 10:18:58 AM  
proper use of "cheah" in the headline
/+1 subby
 
2012-10-19 10:45:12 AM  
Well, that explains chavs.
 
2012-10-19 10:53:01 AM  
This isn't really shocking or out of place with what we already found out stateside:

Brain Injury Rate 7 Times Greater among U.S. Prisoners (pops)

This has been found before - not by survey, by basic tests of brain function (i.e. the "stand on one foot and pat your head" sorts of tests, not EEG). There's more than just a speck of evidence suggesting that, not all that surprisingly, brain injury or deficit might affect things like impulse control or cognition, and maybe that should be addressed in rehabili...HAHAHAHAHAHAA who am I kidding nobody's gonna let that happen when they can be "tough on crime" and "receiving prison lobby money" instead of actually focusing on why people clearly are showing mental deficit when they commit crimes.
 
2012-10-19 10:59:55 AM  
So I was on Fark and I saw read a headline and I was like...ehhh, whatever
 
2012-10-19 11:00:37 AM  
Damn, I ruined that one.

Here's the link that was supposed to be in my post.

Whatever
 
2012-10-19 11:48:03 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Apparently, 60% of young people in custody say they have experienced a traumatic brain injury.

And apparently 95% of young people in custody say they are innocent.

We probably should believe them, and let them go free.


Ahh, came here to point out the alleged brain trauma but someone beat me to it. :) How do these conversations go, during the booking interview? 'Any medical conditions you need to tell us about?' 'Yesh, traumatic brain injury.'

Also, well done on the Mr Gumby pics. :)
 
2012-10-19 04:59:32 PM  

Kome: here is no reason to sequester individuals with TBI, but there is a desperate need for us to get them the therapy they need.


I'll stop you here because tl;dr.

I'm not saying we should put everyone with a brain injury in camps preventively. I'm saying that the people who commit crimes and "can't help themselves" are more destabilising to society than someone who got a crappy upbringing/moral compass. The latter can be retrained while the people who "can't help themselves" will most likely remain criminals no matter what. Sure, get them the treatment they need or that people think might help. Just do it after they've been locked away for the crime they did.

I don't know how they do it in other countries but over here we got institutions for people who commit crimes and are deemed mentally unfit. I'd rather serve 10 years in regular prison than be sentenced there. In regular prisons your are pretty much guaranteed to get out but if the nice people in the white coats think you aren't fit for release you can be inside forever.
 
2012-10-19 06:21:36 PM  

DerAppie: I'm not saying we should put everyone with a brain injury in camps preventively. I'm saying that the people who commit crimes and "can't help themselves" are more destabilising to society than someone who got a crappy upbringing/moral compass. The latter can be retrained while the people who "can't help themselves" will most likely remain criminals no matter what. Sure, get them the treatment they need or that people think might help. Just do it after they've been locked away for the crime they did.


You appear to have forgotten my first sentence. There are successful therapeutic interventions that currently exist that can help train TBI patients to manage impulse control, attention problems, etc. which if implemented can help prevent these dangerous, unsafe, or illegal behaviors from occurring. It isn't a matter of people with brain damage "not being able to help themselves" because that's pretty much untrue. A neurological issue may impede executive control over one's actions, but the only times it really disables it is in cases so severe that they probably aren't either (a) ambulatory or (b) alive, so it's a moot point. A contentious one even within the neurosciences and rehabilitation services, but I have clearly staked out which side I am on.

The best course of action from a legal, a moral, and an economic perspective would be to help patients with brain damage get the rehabilitative and therapeutic services they need as soon as possible, and not in response to them committing crimes. Prevention is better than cure and all that. At the core of this is your post speaks of a reaction to a problem whereas my post is focused more on acknowledging a precipitating problem and reacting at that stage to prevent the next problem as best we can.
 
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