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(Some Guy)   Jupiter is really big, right? Could it ignite, and become a second Sun? If so, what would that mean for life on Earth? Worry not, your answers are here   (askamathematician.com) divider line 75
    More: Interesting, center of mass, solar masses, Jupiter, solar system, binary systems, Planetary Science, failed star, Gliese  
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9255 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Oct 2012 at 3:42 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-10-18 02:48:03 PM
That reminds me of "Beyond Infinity" by Gregory Benford. Way, wayyy, in the future (with a hotter burning sun), humanity survived by reshaping the solar system. They direct all of the gas giants into Jupiter and it becomes and infrared star that, along with the sun, support life on its moons, Saturns moons (which were moved) and Mars.
 
2012-10-18 02:59:49 PM
i thought there was a movie that addressed this

images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-10-18 03:12:11 PM
It would have to be covered with monoliths.
 
2012-10-18 03:30:50 PM
If Jupiter ignited, it would burn Uranus
 
2012-10-18 03:47:23 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: If Jupiter ignited, it would burn Uranus


That joke sucks like a black hole.
 
2012-10-18 03:50:19 PM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: If Jupiter ignited, it would burn Uranus


Bravo...well played!

Oh, and ignore Cygnus. He must not have got any last night. ;^)
 
2012-10-18 03:52:44 PM
short answer: not a lot.

long answer: basically not a lot, but the sudden increase in mass would very likely change the mechanics of the solar system and alter at least orbital rates.

i like his description in the comments of a 'sky pimple'. that's good.
 
2012-10-18 03:54:00 PM
The Physicist farked up his reply about which Galilean moons would be in the goldilocks zone. Io would probably be too hot, Callisto too cold, but Europa and Ganymede would be okay. The only problem is since they're mostly water they'd probably melt and outgas and basically boil down to whatever rocky cores they might have. Although I could be wrong. Any astrofarkers know if the Galilean moons are large enough to retain their water they heated up to room temperature?
 
2012-10-18 03:57:35 PM

theorellior: The Physicist farked up his reply about which Galilean moons would be in the goldilocks zone. Io would probably be too hot, Callisto too cold, but Europa and Ganymede would be okay. The only problem is since they're mostly water they'd probably melt and outgas and basically boil down to whatever rocky cores they might have. Although I could be wrong. Any astrofarkers know if the Galilean moons are large enough to retain their water they heated up to room temperature?


well, they had to collect it in the first place, so prolly, yeah.

the real question is, would they develop any kind of shielding atmosphere, or would that water quickly go REALLY freaking gnarly from the radiation belts around jupiter?

/europa the tritium mine?
 
2012-10-18 03:58:16 PM
Jupiter is starting to come back into the sky soon(if not already). Time to bust out the ten inch telescope. The first time I seen it with the four Galilean moons, my jaw dropped.

listen to NASA's sounds of Jupiter. It's eery, but strangely beautiful. Seriously, check it out!
 
2012-10-18 04:03:54 PM
Yes. No. Irrelevant.
 
2012-10-18 04:10:03 PM

Mixolydian Master: Time to bust out the ten inch telescope


i1.kym-cdn.com
 
2012-10-18 04:13:32 PM
Short answer: No
Long answer: Nooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oo
 
2012-10-18 04:15:04 PM
The Ashen tried to do it, but SG-1 ruined it.
 
2012-10-18 04:15:20 PM
The article didn't address what the additional gravity would do to the solar system if it's mass was increase by 10000%.

Any physicist here want to tackle that one? In the least, wouldn't that send a slew of asteroids flying in all directions?
 
2012-10-18 04:16:56 PM

buttery_shame_cave: short answer: not a lot.

long answer: basically not a lot, but the sudden increase in mass would very likely change the mechanics of the solar system and alter at least orbital rates.


Yeah, I was a bit disappointed his only take on Jupiter becoming a mini-star was the brightness angle. Increasing its mass by 100x would almost certainly mess with the gravitational equilibrium we've got going on in the solar system (well, relatively), and very likely would cause some major problems. Certainly not short term, but yeah, definitely in the long run.

There's probably a good simulator out there where you could try it out and see what happens, but I'm too lazy to find one.
 
2012-10-18 04:18:09 PM

Dead for Tax Reasons: i thought there was a movie that addressed this

[images1.wikia.nocookie.net image 750x488]


Yes, but in real life something wonderful is NOT going to happen.
 
2012-10-18 04:20:57 PM
Jupiter is really big, right? Could it ignite, and become a second Sun?

No, not even close. Anyone even voicing such idiocy should be dismissed as quickly as morons who claim Betelgeuse will be as bright as the sun (or destroy Earth) when we see it kB
 
2012-10-18 04:21:04 PM
Just don't touch Europa! 
content.forum.canucks.com
 
2012-10-18 04:27:01 PM
I think Sephoroth tried to ignite it with a meteor. Didn't work out well for me if memory serves.
 
2012-10-18 04:30:07 PM

Teknowaffle: The Ashen tried to do it, but SG-1 ruined it.


Came for this reference.
 
2012-10-18 04:33:53 PM

Bhruic: buttery_shame_cave: short answer: not a lot.

long answer: basically not a lot, but the sudden increase in mass would very likely change the mechanics of the solar system and alter at least orbital rates.

Yeah, I was a bit disappointed his only take on Jupiter becoming a mini-star was the brightness angle. Increasing its mass by 100x would almost certainly mess with the gravitational equilibrium we've got going on in the solar system (well, relatively), and very likely would cause some major problems. Certainly not short term, but yeah, definitely in the long run.

There's probably a good simulator out there where you could try it out and see what happens, but I'm too lazy to find one.


"Universe Sandbox" is a good one. On Steam, $10 ... It would be easy to open the Solar System scenario, increase Jupiter's mass, and hit "go". It's totally geeky fun for $10.
 
2012-10-18 04:33:57 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-10-18 04:45:27 PM

Smoky Dragon Dish: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 720x308]


www.agoracosmopolitan.com

better angle
 
2012-10-18 04:52:59 PM

Mixolydian Master: Smoky Dragon Dish: [1.bp.blogspot.com image 720x308]

[www.agoracosmopolitan.com image 500x412]

better angle


I like the view from the visitor center better...

photos1.blogger.com
 
2012-10-18 04:54:21 PM

buttery_shame_cave: theorellior: The Physicist farked up his reply about which Galilean moons would be in the goldilocks zone. Io would probably be too hot, Callisto too cold, but Europa and Ganymede would be okay. The only problem is since they're mostly water they'd probably melt and outgas and basically boil down to whatever rocky cores they might have. Although I could be wrong. Any astrofarkers know if the Galilean moons are large enough to retain their water they heated up to room temperature?

well, they had to collect it in the first place, so prolly, yeah.

the real question is, would they develop any kind of shielding atmosphere, or would that water quickly go REALLY freaking gnarly from the radiation belts around jupiter?

/europa the tritium mine?


The REAL question is would they have strong enough magnetic poles to help shield them from radiation
 
2012-10-18 04:55:46 PM

StopLurkListen: Bhruic: buttery_shame_cave: short answer: not a lot.

long answer: basically not a lot, but the sudden increase in mass would very likely change the mechanics of the solar system and alter at least orbital rates.

Yeah, I was a bit disappointed his only take on Jupiter becoming a mini-star was the brightness angle. Increasing its mass by 100x would almost certainly mess with the gravitational equilibrium we've got going on in the solar system (well, relatively), and very likely would cause some major problems. Certainly not short term, but yeah, definitely in the long run.

There's probably a good simulator out there where you could try it out and see what happens, but I'm too lazy to find one.

"Universe Sandbox" is a good one. On Steam, $10 ... It would be easy to open the Solar System scenario, increase Jupiter's mass, and hit "go". It's totally geeky fun for $10.


well goodbye ten bucks...

/was saving up for another bottle of tullamore dew...
//this looks like more fun tho.
 
2012-10-18 04:57:37 PM

Mixolydian Master: Jupiter is starting to come back into the sky soon(if not already). Time to bust out the ten inch telescope. The first time I seen it with the four Galilean moons, my jaw dropped.

listen to NASA's sounds of Jupiter. It's eery, but strangely beautiful. Seriously, check it out!


Eery, but strangely beautiful? That's what I thought about sounds from Uranus.
 
2012-10-18 04:58:16 PM
Cue the monoliths!
 
2012-10-18 05:02:37 PM

CygnusDarius: MaudlinMutantMollusk: If Jupiter ignited, it would burn Uranus

That joke sucks like a black hole.


Racist.
 
2012-10-18 05:04:59 PM
cool article... glad that there is no shortage of monoliths.
 
2012-10-18 05:17:34 PM
The second sun was found by Spartakus
 
2012-10-18 05:19:47 PM

Fano: The second sun was found by Spartakus


The seventh sun of the seventh sun was found by Iron Maiden
 
2012-10-18 05:20:28 PM
 
2012-10-18 05:21:53 PM
Hey, hands off! All those worlds are ours. Well, except Europa. It's the Florida of the Jupiter system. Trust me, attempt no landings there. They'll try to sell you a timeshare while they boost your ride.

/floridian
 
2012-10-18 05:33:20 PM
i plugged it into universe sandbox at 0.1 sun mass

seems like it didn't really affect the orbits that much but it made the asteroid belt go completely nuts, flinging those things all over the place, some went straight out of the solar system and a bunch kind of end up zipping in and out near the sun, and some others all clumping up around jupiter
 
2012-10-18 05:36:14 PM

The Slush: Link


Your band sucks.
 
2012-10-18 05:44:36 PM

Raoul Eaton: Yes. No. Irrelevant.


Thank you, that needed to be said.

Jupiter is huge, but it would need to be something like fifty times as massive as it is now to become a star, and bottom-of-the-barrel red dwarf at that. The sun is in the 85th percentile as far as stellar mass is concerned, IIRC.

The most incredible part of learning astronomy is getting a sense of scale. The Earth is big, Jupiter is huge, the Sun is makes Jupiter puny, and it's merely an above-average star in our galaxy.

Oh, and as for the Douglas Adams quote. . . his books used space as a vehicle for satire; the quote about "space is big" mocks the layperson's lack of scale. It's a good quote, but it's not really about space. If you think it is, the joke is literally on you.
 
2012-10-18 05:46:35 PM

spesimen: i plugged it into universe sandbox at 0.1 sun mass

seems like it didn't really affect the orbits that much but it made the asteroid belt go completely nuts, flinging those things all over the place, some went straight out of the solar system and a bunch kind of end up zipping in and out near the sun, and some others all clumping up around jupiter


You know I wondered about that.
 
2012-10-18 05:47:23 PM

spesimen: the asteroid belt go completely nuts, flinging those things all over the place, some went straight out of the solar system and a bunch kind of end up zipping in and out near the sun, and some others all clumping up around jupiter


So, explosive diarrhea, then constipation?
 
2012-10-18 06:00:10 PM
Something is going to happen ... Something wonderful.
 
2012-10-18 06:08:54 PM

spesimen: i plugged it into universe sandbox at 0.1 sun mass

seems like it didn't really affect the orbits that much but it made the asteroid belt go completely nuts, flinging those things all over the place, some went straight out of the solar system and a bunch kind of end up zipping in and out near the sun, and some others all clumping up around jupiter


I just did the same thing. I can confirm this. This makes it scientific law right?
 
2012-10-18 06:12:41 PM

Mixolydian Master: Jupiter is starting to come back into the sky soon(if not already). Time to bust out the ten inch telescope. The first time I seen it with the four Galilean moons, my jaw dropped.

listen to NASA's sounds of Jupiter. It's eery, but strangely beautiful. Seriously, check it out!


Check out the radiojove project as well. Google for it, can't link from my phone.
 
2012-10-18 06:18:18 PM

CygnusDarius: MaudlinMutantMollusk: If Jupiter ignited, it would burn Uranus

That joke sucks like a black hole.


Oddly enough, the first object in space widely accepted to be a black hole was Cygnus X-1. So... you're saying that joke sucks like you? How much is that, just out of curiosity?
 
2012-10-18 06:19:18 PM

Jerseysteve22: spesimen: i plugged it into universe sandbox at 0.1 sun mass

seems like it didn't really affect the orbits that much but it made the asteroid belt go completely nuts, flinging those things all over the place, some went straight out of the solar system and a bunch kind of end up zipping in and out near the sun, and some others all clumping up around jupiter

I just did the same thing. I can confirm this. This makes it scientific law right?


woot! i'll inform the nobel comittee
 
2012-10-18 06:29:40 PM
i233.photobucket.com
 
2012-10-18 06:38:31 PM

malaktaus: CygnusDarius: MaudlinMutantMollusk: If Jupiter ignited, it would burn Uranus

That joke sucks like a black hole.

Oddly enough, the first object in space widely accepted to be a black hole was Cygnus X-1. So... you're saying that joke sucks like you? How much is that, just out of curiosity?


t.qkme.me
 
2012-10-18 07:12:55 PM

fustanella: Hey, hands off! All those worlds are ours. Well, except Europa. It's the Florida of the Jupiter system. Trust me, attempt no landings there. They'll try to sell you a timeshare while they boost your ride.

/floridian


If Jupiter was on track to become a sun, you better be invested in Eurpoa. When Jupiter becomes a sun, Europa would then be a planet. Huge appreciation comes with that planet designation.


**the_more_you_know.jpg**
 
2012-10-18 07:28:56 PM

whosits_112: Just don't touch Europa! 
[content.forum.canucks.com image 480x306]


The biggest screwup in that movie was recreating the Discovery sets with CRT displays instead of the rear-projection Kubrick used. Kubrick's look like LCDs.
 
2012-10-18 07:31:54 PM

spesimen: i plugged it into universe sandbox at 0.1 sun mass

seems like it didn't really affect the orbits that much but it made the asteroid belt go completely nuts, flinging those things all over the place, some went straight out of the solar system and a bunch kind of end up zipping in and out near the sun, and some others all clumping up around jupiter


This would be bad news...for Earth.
 
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